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Full text of "Susquehanna Alumnus (1967-1970)"

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in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/susquehannaalumn3739susq 



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FALL 1967 






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Directory of Officers 1967-68 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Alumni Association 

Albert P. Molinaro Jr. '50, 5061 Tippecanoe Ave., Evansville, Ind. 47715 President 

Marlyn R. Fetterolf '23, 1636 Sunshine Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15901 Vice President 

Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42, 1629 S. Crescent Blvd., Yardley, Pa. 19068 Vice President 

Dorothy Turner '36, 781 Wyoming Ave., Kingston, Pa. 18704 Recording Secetary 

Chester G. Rowe '52, 306 W. Pine St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 Treasurer 

Louise Mehring Koontz '35 (Mrs. Howard E. Jr.), Wyndwood Hill, 
Route 7, Box 24-C, Westminster, Md. 21157 

Representative on the University Board of Directors 
Lawrence M. Isaacs '43, 27 Thornewood Rd., Windmill Farm, Armonk, N.Y. 10504 

Representative on the University Board of Directors 
Simon B. Rhoads '30, Susquehanna Ave., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 

Representative to Athletic Committee 
Jack P. Shipe '40, Herndon, Pa. 17830 Representative to Athletic Committee 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1968 
Mabel Kinzey Fetterolf '24 (Mrs. Marlyn R. ), 1636 Sunshine Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15901 
Dr. John F. Hanna '35, 116 W. Mitchell Ave., State College, Pa. 16801 
Harold E. Shaffer '40, 319 E. Marshall St., West Chester, Pa. 19380 
Donald C. Berninger '52, 306 W. Penn St., Muncy, Pa. 17756 
H. Nathan Ward '63, 546 Hummel Ave., Lemoyne, Pa. 17043 

Executive Board members-at-hrge, term expiring 1969 
Dr. Lawrence C. Fisher '31, Box 418, R.D. #2, Dover, Pa. 17315 
John Yonkondy '36, 357 Shoemaker St., Swoyerville, Pa^ 18704 
Harry W. Butts Jr. '48, 335 Chester Rd., Devon, Pa. 19333 
Dr. Nelson E. Bailey '57, R.R. #1, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 
Lynn E. Lerew '63, 324 Carlton Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1970 
Timothy E. Barnes '35, 251 N. Park St., Mt. Carmel, Pa. 17851 

Dorothy Eilhardt Gundrum '48 (Mrs. Eugene H.), 1182 Sarah St., Bethel Park, Pa. 15102 
The Rev. Dale S. Bringman '48, 220 Homan Ave., State College, Pa. 16801 
Dr. James C. Gehris '50, W. Chestnut St., Shamokin, Pa. 17872 
Nancy Davis Raab '61 (Mrs. John H.), 33 Oakland Ave., Apt. 31, Bloomfield. N.J. 07007 

District Club Organizations 
ALTOONA 

W. Elwyn Taylor '08, 3600 Beale Ave., Altoona, Pa. 16601 President 

Addison E. Pohle '27, 1108 - 22nd Ave., Altoona, Pa. 16601 Vice President 

Bettie Winey Moorhead '54 (Mrs. Gerald E.), R.D. #1, Martinsburg, Pa. 16662 

Secretary-Treasurer 
BALTIMORE 
To be elected 

CALIFORNIA 
Dr. Robert N. Troutman '26, 434 W. 12th St., Claremont, Calif. 91711 President 

CENTRE-UNION 

Donald F. Spooner '43, 716 E. Beaver Ave., State College, Pa. 16801 President 

The Rev. Kenneth R. Anderson '35, Centre Hall, Pa. 16828 Vice President 

CHAMBERSBURG-HAGERSTOWN 

Lynn E. Lerew '63, 324 Carlton Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 President 

Paul Lucas '38, 1855 Scotland Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 Vice President 

Marcella Chaya Tumbach (Mrs. Edward) '36, 401 W. King St., Shippensburg, Pa. 17257 

Secretary-Treasurer 
HARRISBURG 
Janice Adams John '59 (Mrs. Lawrence L.), 1602 Erford Rd.. West, Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 

President 
Richard J. Tietbohl '60, 10 Richland Lane, Apt. 103, Americana Apts., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 

Vice President 
Catherine Byrod Whitman '44 (Mrs. Clayton K.), 571 Walnut Rd.. Stcclton, Pa. 17092 

Secretary-Treasurer 
(Continued on page 35) 




ON OUR COVER 
Imaginative floats requiring many 
hours of work by sorority and fraternity 
members are a traditional Homecoming 
feature of colleges and universities across 
the nation. The float theme at Susque- 
hanna this year was television commer- 
cials. Sigma Kappa again won the soror- 
ity competition by depicting a large can 
of "Raid" spraying an insect which rep- 
resented S.U.'s football opponent, Ithaca 
College. 



AND INSIDE 

A Selinsgrove native who studied and 
danced with some of the most famous 
ballet artists in the world has been doing 
the choreography for Susquehanna's 
musical productions. "A Contribution to 
Culture" (pages 7-9) describes some of 
the highlights of Jack Potteiger's career 
and his unique gift to the university. 

In addition, we have printed the en- 
tire text of the excellent address given 
by Dr. Maurice Brooks at the Opening 
Convocation and Fall Commencement, 
"The Value of The Small University" 
(pages 10-14). 

We hope you enjoy diese and other 
features of die Fall Alumnus, such as 
the photographic coverage of Home- 
coming, Frederick Machmer's article on 
S.U. football in days of yore, Lynn O. 
Ramcr's reminiscences in "A True Tale 
of Spelunking," Orren Wagner's impres- 
sions on what it was like to return to 
his alma mater after an absence of 40 
years, and the numerous personal items 
about alumni collected by Buss Carr's 
indefatigable secretary, Mrs. Donald 
"Peg" Ernst. 



Ronald E. Berkheimer 
Acting Editor 

Charles H. "Buss" Carr '52 
Director of Alumni Relations 



The SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Vol. 37 



FALL 1967 



No. 1 



CONTENTS 

Directory of Officers .... inside front cover 

Homecoming, 1967 4 

A Contribution to Culture 7 

by The Rev. Charles Price 

The Value of The Small University 10 

by Dr. Maurice Brooks 

SU Sports 15 

by Ron Berkheimer 

Guards Back and a Peg Leg 16 

by Frederick E. Machmer 

S.U. Sports Hall of Fame - Where Are They Now? . 17 

Susquehanna Revisited 19 

by Orren Wagner '26 

Club News 20 

Susquehannans On Parade 21 

Advanced Degrees 23 

A True Tale of Spelunking 26 

by Lynn O. Ramer '23 

"I Do" 27 

Winter Sports Schedules 27 

Dr. Russ Writes Booklet 29 

SU Vignette 30 

Bom Crusaders 31 

Deaths 31 

Carr's Column 33 

by Buss Carr '52 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Publish- 
ed four times a year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



FALL 1967 




Three bands performed for the crowd at halfrime. 



Homecoming, 1967 




Drum major Ray Moyer and Queen 
Denise Horton. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




'Rip" Engle speaks at- Hall of Fame banquet. 



Tau Kappa Epsilon and Sigma Kappa won the 
float competition again. 





Merle Beam '22 and Parke Wagner '26 were 
among the first in line at the registration table. 




Sophomore guard Henry DePerro takes 
the pause that refreshes. 







****** 


ML, *rpt 



S.U. quarterback Jerry Carothers (left) is spilled by Ithaca tacklers and fullback Ron 
Hill (30) picks up several yards. 





^ '"* -% 



Cross country team scored the only victory of the day by beating Albright, but Gettysburg 
nipped the Crusaders in the three-team meet. 



Drew edged Susquehanna in soccer 2-1. 
The winning goal came on a penalty 
kick with two seconds to play. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Jack Potteiger coaches Karhy Franke and Nancy Comp in one of the 
dances in "Carnival." 



A Contribution to Culture 



by THE REV. CHARLES PRICE 



May 5, 1967, 7:30 P.M. 

It was that electric moment when a show hegan 
and the curtain rose for the first performance of "Car- 
nival" in the new Chapel-Auditorium. 

That moment fulfilled the hopes and dreams of 
many people — the countless number who made the 
building possible and the students and faculty who 
for the first time had facilities suitable for the presen- 
tation of the annual Spring Musical. 

"Carnival" was the first musical presented in the 
Chapel-Auditorium and it was a thrilling experience 
for performers and spectators alike. 

The performers could appreciate the commodious 
stage, the orchestra pit, and the large dressing rooms. 
The audience obviously enjoyed the comfortable seats. 

(Who can forget that flapping tent with its make- 
shift stage?) 

But facilities, despite their importance, are second- 



ary. To paraphrase Shakespeare: "The show's the 
tiling." 

The Spring Musical has become an annual tradi- 
tion at Susquehanna. It entails a tremendous amount 
of work for the university's Music Division and seems 
to attract more off-campus attention each year. 

These productions involve drama, music, and 
dance. The latter is the speciality of Jack Potteiger, 
who since 1964 has been doing the choreography for 
the musical, contributing his time and professional 
competence as a "labor of love." 

The Potteiger name is a familiar one to Susque- 
hanna. Mary Potteiger '24 joined the faculty even 
before she received her bachelor's degree from the 
university and taught piano and music theory until 
her retirement last spring. Ann Potteiger '12 taught 
art for a number of years in the Ambler schools. Ad- 
vised to retire early because of ill health, she gave 



FALL 1967 



three years of her "retirement" to her alma mater, 
teaching art appreciation. 

But the interest of the Potteigers in Susquehanna 
goes back even further to the cultural concern of 
their parents, the late Dr. and Mrs. Albert R. Potteiger. 

Dr. Potteiger came to Selinsgrove to practice 
veterinary medicine in the early 1890s. His independ- 
ence of mind and the respect in which he was held 
is evident in the fact that he was elected county treas- 
urer as a Democrat. Snyder County was even more 
staunchly Republican then than it is now. 

He and his wife encouraged their seven children 
to attend all the cultural events at Susquehanna. Mary 
Potteiger remembers how as a child she walked the 
old "board walk" to Seibert Hall to attend a concert, 
hear a lecture, or see a play. 

All seven of the Potteiger children studied at the 
university and five were graduated from Susquehanna. 
Robert 18 followed in his father's footsteps as a vet- 
erinarian. Albert '20 had a career as a teacher and 
principal in the Selinsgrove schools and Mildred '29 
is teaching now in the commercial department of Sel- 
insgrove Area High School. 

Jack Potteiger sought a career in ballet ("They 
thought I was a nut," he says.) and studied in Phila- 
delphia with Catherine Littlefiekl and Mikhail Mordkin. 
Mordkin had formerly been with the Imperial Ballet 
School of Moscow and the premier danseur of the 
Bolshoi Theatre. 

Jack's first professional appearance was in the 
Spanish dance in the second act in "La Traviata," 
presented at the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company 
under the direction of Miss Littlefiekl. In the early 
1930s he also danced for Miss Littlefield's company 
at the Academy of Music and with her later in Phila- 
delphia Ballet Company performances with the Phila- 
delphia Orchestra. 

He toured Western Europe with the Philadelphia 
Ballet, appearing at such famous theatres as the Lon- 
don Hippodrome, Theatre Champs Elysees in Paris, 
the Royal Theatre in Brussels, and the Theatre in the 
Casino at Deauville. While in Paris he also studied 
with Lubov Egorova, formerly prima ballerina of the 
Maryinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg, Russia. 

Returning to the United States, he was Miss 
Littlefield's partner in "Carmen" and "Samson and 
Delilah" at the Chicago Civic Opera in 1937. 

He choreographed the ballet "Fantasia" to the 
music of Johann Strauss. It was presented by the 




Potteiger demonstrates a step tor Pamela Merbreier. 



Littlefiekl Ballet at the Chicago Civic Opera with 
Miss Littlefiekl dancing the principal role of the 
Phoenix Bird. 

Potteiger became a scholarship student at the 
School of American Ballet when it opened in New 
York in 1934. The school was founded by Lincoln 
Kirstein and Edward M.M. Warburg of the Museau 
of Modern Art. George Balanchine was brought to 
New York as choreographer of the American Ballet, 
forerunner of the present New York City Ballet. Bal- 
anchine is still its principal choreographer. He and 
Kirstein are the present directors. 

Here Potteiger studied with Pierre Vladimiroff, 
Balanchine and Anatole Vilzak, all from the Imperial 
Ballet School and Maryinsky Theatre of St. Petersburg, 
now the Kirov Theatre of Leningrad. 

In 1940 lie danced in the first season of the Ballet 
Theatre, now called the American Ballet Theatre. He 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



appeared in "Swan Lake,* "Giselle," "Peter and the 
Wolf," "The Great American Goof," "Voices of Spring," 
"Carnival," "Ballet Mechanique," and "La Fille Mai 
Gardee." The latter, incidentally, is the oldest ballet 
still being performed. It was first presented in Bord- 
eaux, France, in 17S6. 

Potteiger also danced intermittently in many stage 
shows at New York City Music Hall and partnered 
with Patricia Bowman, former ballerina of the Ballet 
Theatre, in New York night clubs such as The Mar- 
tinique and the Copa Cabana. 

In addition, he began teaching dance, finding it 
"more stimulating and rewarding than performing." 
He taught for many years at 1658 Broadway and 
later at the Show Case Studios, 950 Eighth Ave. 

"I taught children, professionals and future pro- 
fessionals, amateurs, dilettantes, and all those drawn 
to dancing for any reason whatsoever," he says. 

One of his students was a typewriter fortune 
heiress who "loved dancing as an avocation and out- 
let." Another was Dr. Helene Mayer, attached to var- 
ious hospitals in New York City. Dr. Mayer was 
searching for a better system of exercise for amputees 
through the study of ballet techniques, but she con- 
tinued to dance because she claimed the nurses found 
that it improved her disposition. 

Among the famous and near-famous who studied 
with him in New York are Bose Cosio (better known 
by the stage name she later adopted, Bita Moreno), 
Janis Page, Timmy Everett, Vera Ellen, choreographer 



Jack Potteiger will serve as choreographer for 

the S.U. Division of Music production of the Gilbert 
and Sullivan operetta "Pirates of Penzance." 

Two Alumni Weekend performances of the 
'Pirates of Penzance" arc scheduled for 8 p.m. Friday, 
May 3, and 3 p.m. Saturday, May 4, in the Chapel- 
Auditorium. 

The production originally was scheduled for Jan- 
uary 6 and 7, but was then postponed until next spring 
when it will be presented as a combination of the an- 
nual Opera Workshop and Spring Musical. 



Danny Daniels, Jane Mansfield (mother and daughter), 
Helen Wood, the original Hamilton Trio, Lynn Loring, 
and Bambi Lynn. 

Potteiger's first professional contribution to Sus- 
quehanna was his coaching and choreography for the 
production of "Kiss Me Kate" in 1964. Those who 
saw the show remember the students who presented 
the comic number "Brush Up Your Shakespeare." 

"They were naturals," says Jack. In his opinion, 
they were equal to the performers in the Broadway 
production. 

He also did the choreography for "Bye Bye, 
Birdie" in 1965 and for the Opera Workshop produc- 
tions of "Hansel and Gretel" in 1965 and "Amahl and 
the Night Visitors" in 1966. 

When asked why he does tins volunteer work, 
Potteiger said that he finds it enjoyable and creative. 
Most teachers feel, he explained, that it takes nine 
years to develop a ballet dancer. In college produc- 
tions, however, he is faced with the challenge of creat- 
ing in a brief period of time — with individuals who 
have little or no ballet training — a dance appropriate 
to the production, yet simple enough to be performed 
"convincingly" in expressing the character that is being 
portrayed. 

Looking back over his own dancing and teaching 
career, he muses that he was bom "thirty years before 
my time." Yet lie rejoices in the fact that he was able 
to participate in the struggle to make ballet an ac- 
ceptable art form to a significant segment of the 
American public. 

Those of us who have seen the campus produc- 
tions that Potteiger helped to stage can appreciate 
them a bit more when we know the dedication, pro- 
fessional competence, and creative skill he has shared 
with the university. 

His unique contribution to Susquehanna can be 
seen not only as a justification for integrity of intel- 
lectual pursuit, but also as a justification for providing 
the experience of amateur performance in the arts. 

Although it was for many, many years only a small 
college in a small rural town, Susquehanna has 
added to the cultural life of its students and its com- 
munity. Thus it has inspired young people to enter 
careers in the arts. 

Now in Jack Potteiger's generous sharing of his 
professional talents, we can see the fulfillment of the 
Scriptural exhortation: "Cast thy bread upon the 
waters: for thou shalt find it after many days." 



FALL 1967 



The Value of The Small University 



by DR. MAURICE BROOKS 



Only a little while ago I would have chosen a 
different title for these remarks. So thoroughly have 
we been taught to equate bigness with greatness that 
some friends of Susquehanna University would have 
resented any association of the adjective "small" with 
this proud institution. Being small in reality was, we 
liked to think, only a developmental stage, a step to- 
ward growing larger, and we were apologetic until 
time had brought us to greater size. 

Even as we held to these beliefs, there were some 
who recognized their fallacies. There's the story of the 
idealistic college student who bored his listeners with 
his constant lament, "Oh, I can scarcely wait to get 
out into the world, and to do somediing big and 
clean!" To which some long-suffering listener finally 
replied, "Why don't you go out and wash an elephant?" 

But much that has happened during the past 
thirty years, one human generation, has given us new 
perspectives, new ways of evaluating the events and 
the forces which move and regulate us. The energy 
locked widiin die atom, long regarded as indivisible, is 
so tremendous, and to many of us so awesome, that 
we have invented a new vocabulary to define it. 

Human heredity, die mechanisms by which traits 
and characteristics are passed from parent to offspring, 
has long been one of mankind's great mysteries, the 
subject for endless speculation and guesswork. Just 
recendy the geneticists and biochemists have given us 
some of the answers. Through the code names of 
DNA and BNA, we may catch glimpses of the extra- 
ordinary chemical selections and assortments which 
accompany the conception and development of each 
living thing. Surely not the least impressive of diese 
discoveries is embodied in the statement which some 
authority has made, that all the vital chemical deter- 
miners for the entire human race might be enclosed 
within a sphere die size of a baseball. 

Such freshly-opened windows as these, such new 
vistas for die mind's enlargement, have compelled us 
to a new sense of values. We have come to a realiza- 
tion that the vital question is not, "How big is it?," but 
rather, "How important is it, and how does it function 
in the world's economy?" 

One result, a happy one, of this clearer vision has 
been the conscious striving of certain institutions for 
excellence rather than for bigness. Into this framework 



the small university, where quality rather than quantity 
is the goal sought, fits with peculiar aptness. Here 
are nurtured those values which we have chosen to 
call the humanities, a summation of the arts and 
graces which have placed man above his fellow 
animals. 

Before I develop further these ideas as they relate 
to smaller educational institutions, I ask your indul- 
gence for a closer look at a parallel, one which has 
captured my own interest and stirred my emotions. 

Mrs. Brooks and I have recently made our annual 
pilgrimage to the Canadian Shakespearean Festival 
in Stratford, Ontario. During fourteen years we have 
made these visits, and the wonder at such excellent 
theatre, along with our greater insight into the genius 
of Shakespeare, has expanded as the seasons have 
passed. 

A few details will show the pertinence of the 
Stratford theatre to the dieme which I am trying to 
develop. 

Stratford, Ontario, is a small industrial town set 
in the middle of a farm region which would look at 
home in the Susquehanna Valley. The land produces 
small grains, cattle, and dairy products, and die set- 
tlers are in large part of German extraction, many of 
them adherents to the Quaker, Mennonite, or Amish 
faiths. 

The town which is their trading center had no 
theatre tradition of any depth or viability. Its citizens 
are solid business men, many of them products of 
local farms. Their cultural and educational interests 
were developed around a small junior college. 

But the town and community had, perhaps through 
accident, certain assets and certain challenges to an 
active mind. It was named Stratford, and through it 
flowed a small river, the Avon. A nearby village was 
called Shakespeare, and others bore names from the 
Bard's characters. 

During his service in the Canadian army in World 
War II, a Stratford native, Tom Patterson, was station- 
ed in England, where he found opportunity to see 
performances of some of the great theatrical troupes 
which are the pride of that land. His experiences, and 
the parallels which inevitably suggested themselves, 
woidd not leave his mind. He came home and started 
talking, for a time a voice in the wilderness, but 
gradually passing on his ideas and enthusiasms to 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




others. It took time, but slowly his vision grew to 
reality. 

From the beginning Patterson and his associates 
aimed at nothing less than the greatest, or one of 
the greatest, of the world's classic theaters. It was 
either do the job superlatively well or not at all; there 
were to be no compromises and no mediocrity which 
was avoidable. 

When after agonizing difficulties and disappoint- 
ments the first performance was given, it opened in 
a modified tent erected by the canvas specialists of 
Ringling Brothers Circus. And the first lines ever 
spoken from the stage, uttered by Alec Guinness in 
the role of Richard III, set the scene for what was 
to be. 

"Now is the winter of our discontent made glor- 
ious summer by this sun of York 

And glorious summer it has been through the 
years. Some of the greatest of contemporary stage 
personalities have been proud to speak their lines 
from the Stratford stage. They knew that Shakespeare 
was written to be acted and seen, not read pedantic- 
ally in unimaginative classrooms. When it was an- 
nounced that Christopher Plummer, of "Sound of 
Music" fame, would appear as Mark Antony this 
season, even- performance sold out within the first 
two weeks, this in a theatre which seats over 2,200 
people. 

The stage in this living theatre is a platform around 
which the audience is seated. There are no curtains, 
foot-lights, or proscenium arch; no artificial barriers 



Dr. Brooks, professor of wildlife manage- 
ment at West Virginia University, delivered 
this address Sept. 14 at the Opening Con- 
vocation and Fall Commencement in the 
Chapel-Auditorium. A widely known biolo- 
gist, forester and ornithologist, Dr. Brooks 
is the author of The Appalachians, first 
book in a projected series entitled The 
Naturalist's America. S.U. honored him 
with the doctor of science degree. 



separate performers from viewers. The audience is, 
in a very real sense, on stage, within a few feet of 
the major performers. These are personalities here 
and now, and we partake of their emotions and their 
artistry. 

I am sure that you have already sensed my reasons 
for elaborating on this Stratford experience. There 
are so many similarities in purpose and execution to 
the aims and operation of a good liberal arts univer- 
sity. Both the Stratford Theatre and the educational 
institution use such human resources as are at hand 
and endeavor to make them richer and fuller. It seem- 
ed at times that the whole Stratford entei-pri.se was 
impossible, yet it worked and it lives. 

People, as students, faculty, alumni, or visitors, 
turn to such institutions as Susquehanna University 
for the same reasons, and with die same urgency, as 
they do to the life dramas of Shakespeare. They are 
looking for sanctuary and assurance in a world which 
has grown almost unbearably complicated and threat- 
ening. For the past fifty years and more, this has 
been a world at war, sometimes cold and quiescent, 
but too often breaking into flame. Around us have 
been great powers, with peoples more numerous than 
our own — in Russia, in Germany and its allies, and 
more recently in the Far East — whose avowed pur- 
pose is the destruction of Christianity, of Judaism, of 
democracy, and of the last vestiges of human freedom 
and dignity. We have known, all our lives, not peace 
but a sword. 

Little wonder that so many of us seek what com- 
fort and reassurance we may find, and that we dis- 
cover those diings on the campuses of the small liberal 
arts colleges and universities. Here people develop 
and keep a respect for others as individuals, fellow 
human beings. Here we dwell together, sometimes at 
least in harmony and in common trust. We are all on 
stage, and we partake of mutual problems, difficulties, 
and successes. 

In my remarks to you this evening, my major theses 
are two — first, that mankind has been endowed with 
gifts and powers that enable him to shape his own 



FALL 1967 




Professor Brooks receives honorary doctor of science degree at 
Opening Convocation. 



life and find his own peace and happiness, and sec- 
ond, that the campus of a small liberal arts college is 
an ideal place, perhaps the only one yet devised, to 
learn those adjustments to others which make civilized 
life possible. 

Turning now to the first of these propositions, I 
approach it as a biologist and as a life long conserva- 
tionist. I have spent more than forty years of my life 
in teaching young people, and from this experience 
I have gained two profound convictions — that in 
most of us there is a reservoir of human decency, and 
secondly that the struggle to conserve and develop 
these better traits of humanity is tremendously worth 
the effort. I find that I approach each new class with 
fresh expectations and fresh faith. 

Conservation has been defined (well defined, I 
think) as man's attempt to live in harmony with his 
surroundings. It goes without saying that surround- 
ings include forces of nature, physical features and 
conditions, and other living tilings, the most impor- 
tant of all being other human beings — family, friends, 
neighbors at hand and those who are neighbors in the 
Good Samaritan sense. Natural forces can be terriblv 
destructive, but they may also be harnessed and made 
useful. All our associates will share in the imper- 
fections that we also have, yet good and fruitful re- 
lationships may be established and cultivated. It 
pretty much depends on the devotion and the under- 
standing of each individual. It is within each in- 
dividual's power to shape much of the environment 
and the community within which he chooses to dwell. 
These are awesome powers which have been given us; 
great suffering may result from their wrong uses, but 
the bright rainbow of hope promises us that their 
proper employment may also lead to great human 



happiness. On such understandings are built good 
family life, good circles of friends, good communities, 
and good college campuses. 

My second thesis (one that I shall try to develop 
more fully) is that a small liberal arts college, and 
the community of interests and people who develop 
around it, is a wonderful place for students to learn 
to live. It is still a personal sort of place, and the 
individual counts. Its welfare depends on the coopera- 
tive efforts of a number of people. Of necessity, it 
must concern itself primarily with great truths and 
great accomplishment — those flowerings of the past 
which mankind has thought it worthwhile to preserve. 
It is dedicated to the best things, and the highest 
ideals, that humanity has produced. 

In a small college atmosphere your fellow stu- 
dents, your associates in classroom, dormitory, and 
playfield, are not faceless and nameless numbers, an- 
other bit fed into a computing machine. Instead, they 
are individuals, even as you are. They come to know 
you. and you come to know them, as personalities 
with faults and failings, but also with good qualities 
which you may well reach out for in friendship. 

If you have personal integrity, a high code of 
behavior, your fellow students will know it, and they 
will respect and trust you accordingly. If, unhappily, 
you slip away from such ideals, they will know that 
too. They see you in your daily activities, and they 
know those things in you which are honest and also 
thosL> which are pretense or sham. They can be harsh 
in their judgements, but also fair and generous. In 
such surroundings, the wise person may learn charity 
for others, to judge not that he be not judged. 

In such a campus community, there will inevi- 
tably be persons whose racial backgrounds, family 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



wealth and position, and fundamental beliefs are very 
different from your own. There are such in even 
greater diversity on the huge campus of course; the 
trouble is that you are not likely to meet and associate 
with them. Students of common background and in- 
terests on a huge university campus tend to fall into 
their own small groups. In these they meet persons 
and hear views similar to their own; they may never 
encounter other honest viewpoints. When they do 
meet them, they are inclined to be scornful or sus- 
picious. They may well miss some important facets 
for living in a democratic society. 

Let me draw upon personal experience. I did 
graduate work at the University of Michigan and at 
the Michigan State University; I also taught for a time 
at the University of Minnesota. All of these are great 
institutions, and I had meaningful experiences at the 
three of them. But my student and faculty contacts 
were with other foresters and biologists, and with 
these alone. There were other interest groups of 
course, but we did not share in any of them; our 
schedules were too full and our time too preoccupied. 

On a smaller campus such conditions cannot pre- 
vail. There is no place for the self-contained groups 
with no life outside its own members. Every student 
is, of necessity, placed in tangential relations with 
many other persons of widely-varying interests and 
backgrounds. Each individual must find his place 
and make his way among others who will not neces- 
sarily agree with his views, nor share his beliefs. Thus 
is a tolerance for others, majority or minority, created, 
and thus are students prepared to be comfortable 
under a democratic form of government. 

On a liberal arts college campus, there is a mul- 
tiplicity of jobs to be done by students. The college 
newspaper and the school annual must be edited and 
financed. Debate teams, dramatic productions, and 
musical groups are open to all, and must depend on 
the widest student interest and support. The athlete 
does not live a sequestered life; rather, he is a student 
with other students, making his own contribution to 
his school's reputation and welfare. Thus the spec- 
trum of any individual's activities is likely to be broad- 
er than it could possibly be on a larger and more 
specialized campus. I submit to you that such train- 
ing is a better preparation for business, the profes- 
sions, or just ordinary community living than can 
possibly be offered at our megalopolis universities. 

There is another, and to me a very important 
phase of campus experience in which the smaller 
campus holds certain marked advantages. This is the 
field of student-faculty relationships. Our very image 
of effective teaching is built around the teacher at 
one end of a log, the student at the other, but both 
sitting on the same log. 



Great schools throughout the ages have develop- 
ed around great teachers. But of what value to the 
undergraduate student is a faculty member's reputa- 
tion, learning, personality, and character if the student 
is denied any real contact with his teacher? This is no 
imaginary situation; on many campuses undergradu- 
ate instruction is left to graduate assistants or very 
junior members of the faculty; a student may be a 
number in some large class, but he is only a vacant 
chair if he isn't present. Often he will not know the 
name of his lecturer, and almost surely the lecturer 
will not know personally a single student. The in- 
evitable result of this, so it seems to me, is that classes 
become contests for grades, not genuine learning sit- 
uations. This is particularly true at time of tests and 
examinations; each is a battle of wits between ques- 
tioner and respondent, and all semblance of mean- 
ingful teaching is lost. This may inculcate an even 
more unfortunate attitude; the teacher is in the posi- 
tion of an adversary, an enemy, therefore anything 
that the student can get away with is fair tactics. No 
wonder we have cheating rings on campuses. 

Abundantly blessed are college students if their 
instructors serve as wise counsellors, sharing their 
knowledge, their experience, and their personality! 
When the student has earned it, some even share 
their friendship, and the student is privileged to know 
that faculty members are human beings after all. 

Again, I must call upon my own experience. I 
was never enrolled as a student at Susquehanna, but 
I did attend two other small (at least they seemed 
small then ) colleges in West Virginia. I think of one 
devoted teacher as an example of what individualized 
teaching may be. From his opening lecture, you 
knew that his standards were high; that he respected 
his own work, and expected that odiers would show 
respect. The student's response was to do a little 
more than he had planned to, perhaps a little better 
work than he thought himself capable of. To my 
positive knowledge, this teacher was, time after time, 
offered higher paying, and possibly more prestigious, 
positions in other schools; he always replied with due 
gratefulness and humility, but with a firm "No"; his 
work, he believed, was there, he liked it, and felt that 
he had a job to do. Money cannot tempt instructors 
of such loyalty as that. 

As with other great teachers, he made his sub- 
jects come alive, vital segments of human experience 
and wisdom. Students do not express such things, but 
I am certain that many a one could have echoed the 
words, "Did not our hearts burn within us when he 
spoke with us by the way?" Such men (and women 
too) are truly for all seasons. 

Even 7 college campus, large or small, has its 
proportion of such fine, devoted teachers, a few of 



FALL 1967 



13 



whom may approach or achieve greatness. In a large 
university only a handful of graduate students may 
expect to approach these few; on a smaller campus 
there is still time and space; any worthy person may 
partake of the best the school has to offer. To me, 
these things seem of tremendous significance. 

As I view the educational scene on my own 
campus, as I talk with collegues from other institu- 
tions, and as I read of events on other campuses, it 
seems that too many universities are becoming places 
of unrest, revolt, sometimes open anarchy. Every 
biologist knows that change is inevitable, but he also 
knows that nature is essentially conservative — that 
it tends to build on what is there, and what has proved 
useful. There are mutations of course, radical altera- 
tions of pattern that occur in a single leap. But 
many of these go too deep; they are lethal, destroying 
the organism in which they occur. Our academic life 
and tradition is being threatened by changes that 
seem designed to sweep away the wisdom and ex- 
perience of the ages. 

There are two principal manifestations of this 
unease on college campuses. The more spectacular 
and headline-catching of the two is the sort of pro- 
test, revolt, and revolution that has swept the Berkely 
campus at the unhappy University of California. Much 
of the so-called leadership of tins comes from persons 
who are not even students; they are professional revo- 
lutionaries whose only satisfactions come from stirring 
the waters into mud and then seeking such fish as 
may be found there. To their ranks the dissidents and 
deviates among college students seem to be flocking, 
and this is, perhaps, a blessing for other institutions. 

Anarchy, the denial of all rules and all tenets of 
decency and civilization, is not new, even on the 
campuses. It seems to have assumed an unusually 
virulent form in these troubled times, but it carries 
with it its own catharsis. After a time there is no 
new place to turn, no new depths to plumb, so a 
movement born of negation comes to its inevitable 
end. 

Smaller campuses, particularly where the liberal 
arts traditions are strong and viable, have been largely 
free of such contagions. I cannot imagine on my own 
campus students and faculty, in any large numbers, 
turning away from morality, decency, and a regard 
for the rights and welfare of others. We are all too 
intimately associated; our environment is too varied, 
and our human needs arc too well understood. It is 
hard to conceive of an iron or bamboo curtain on a 
small college campus. 

The second manifestation that is deeply con- 
cerning and disturbing thoughtful people on our 
campuses is subtler, and perhaps even more alarm- 
ing. Like a sort of sheet erosion which daily removes 



bits and particles of soil, with no great landslides, no 
spectacular canyons, this is the decreased regard in 
which are held language, the arts, philosophy — those 
things which constitute the humanities and which 
have made us human. 

Science can be a wondeful and rewarding dis- 
cipline; it can also become a Moloch, demanding its 
daily quota of sacrifices. To conform to its demands, 
we seem likely to devalue the classic and human ex- 
perience. We leave to computers the outcome of our 
elections, the solution of our daily problems, even in 
recent months the selection of a suitable partner for 
this weekends dance. We need no longer think for 
ourselves; there is an easier, surer, more mechanistic 
way of reaching decisions. 

On many campuses it is becoming increasingly 
difficult to staff the English, modern language, and 
philosophy departments, no glamor attaches to these 
as compared with engineering, atomic physics, or 
molecular biology. It is quite possible to attend grad- 
uate school at a renowned university without taking 
a single humanities course, and without meeting a 
single person to whom such things really matter. 

It is still impossible to graduate from a liberal 
arts college without some exposure to those things 
which constitute arts and genuine liberal tradition. 
The wealth of the ages has not been lost or dissipated, 
but it is being worn away by the floods of support 
for applied science. Today, as never before perhaps, 
the small college — its faculty and its students — need 
support, both moral and financial, from those who 
place some value on the past and the experience of the 
ages. 

One's mind turns to an Old Testament story, the 
account of the prophet Elisha and his young follower, 
as they were encamped, fugitives, on the mountain 
at Dothan. They were surrounded and pursued by 
a mighty army, and their plight appeared hopeless 
to the young man. But Elisha, like a wise teacher, 
prayed that his student's eyes might be opened, and 
when this was accomplished, there upon the mountain 
with them was a host with banners and chariots, and 
Elisha could say truly, "Lo, those who are with us 
are more than those who are against us". 

And so I think it is, today, for those who seek 
to preserve and pass on the eternal verities. There 
is a mighty force against us, but still in the back- 
ground is a more numerous host — the authors of 
great books, the painters of meaningful pictures, those 
whose inner harmony has allowed them to compose 
lasting music, the thinkers who have guided our steps 
into morality and religion. Their words are bright 
banners against the sky, their deeds chariots of fire. 
They are at our side, helping us to find on the campus 
our own place of refuge and sanctuary. 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




BASKETBALL coach John Barr may start as 
many as three freshmen when the Crusaders open 
their season Thursday, Dec. 7, at the University of 
Scranton. 

Guards Barry Boblick and Jim Corner, forwards 
Irv Miller and John Blozis, and center Joe Meriwether 
are freshmen making strong bids for starting assign- 
ments. There are 17 freshmen on the squad of 24 
players Barr has been working with during pre-season 
practices. 

Boblick probably will be one of the starters. He 
averaged better than 20 points a game for Our Lady 
of Lourdes High School in Shamokin, Pa. last season, 
leading Lourdes into the finals of the state playoffs 
for Catholic schools. Miller, 6-5, 210-pounder from 
Newtown Square, Pa., led his high school league in 
scoring and was one of the top rebounders. He was 
impressive in a pre-season scrimmage with Bucknell. 

Blozis is a rugged 6-5, 230-pounder from Wilming- 
ton, Del., and Meriwether (Horseheads, N.Y. ) at 6-11 
is thought to be the tallest player ever to enroll at 
Susquehanna. Still another newcomer who could help 
the Crusaders this season is Ed Scherer, sophomore 
transfer student from Syosset, N.Y. Scherer (6-3) is 
agile and a good shot. 

"We're raw, but at least we have the physical 
equipment now," says Barr. 

Barr won't predict the number of games the 
Crusaders will win, but he is much more optimistic 
than he was at the start of last season. Stripped of 
four potential starters through academic losses in the 
spring of 1966, Susquehanna won only 2 of its 23 
games last season. 



Susquehanna did, however, have one brilliant in- 
dividual performer in Rick Eppehimer of Pottstown, 
Pa., who averaged 32.5 points a game and was named 
to the first team of the Associated Press All-Pennsyl- 
vania team. Eppehimer, now a senior, is assured of 
one of the starting assignments. 

Barry Llewellyn, 6-6 junior from Shamokin, also 
will be hard to keep out of the lineup. Llewellyn 
improved rapidly last season, averaging 7.7 points 
and 6.9 rebounds a game. Other returning lettermen 
are junior forwards Frank Trembulak of Toms River, 
N.J., and Jim Roessner of Clearfield, Pa. 



John Vignone '65 is the new assistant basketball 
coach. A former three-sport star at S.U., Vignone also 
is an outfielder in die Houston Astros chain. He was 
assigned to the Astros' Class A team at Asheville, 
N.C., team last spring and was promoted several weeks 
later to Amarillo, Tex. in the Double A Texas League. 
Hampered by a leg injury and limited to pinch hitting 
during the final mondi of the season, he batted .275 
at Amarillo. 

Vignone won four letters at Susquehanna in base- 
ball, three in football, and two in basketball. He led 
the baseball team in hitting for three seasons, rushed 
for 1,309 yards and intercepted 22 passes as a football 
halfback, and was co-captain of both the baseball and 
basketball teams as a senior. 



As THE ALUMNUS went to press, S.U. appeared 
to be on its way to its first winning season in soccer. 
The Crusaders had a 5-3-1 record and needed only 

(Continued on page 32) 



FALL 1967 



15 



Guards Back and a Peg Leg 



This article, reprinted from The 
Selinsgrove Times of Sept. 22, 1938, 
is the last in a series about Sus- 
quehanna football in earlier years. 



by FREDERICK E. MACHMER 



With the autumn season rolling around, sports 
fans die country over are removing overcoats from 
mothballs and are ready for football. 

To Selinsgrove sports adherents, double the en- 
joyment of die season is at hand, what with Selins- 
grove liigh school and Susquehanna University on the 
comeback trail to recovery of lost laurels. 

Wliile interested persons in this region are now 
beginning their street comer quarterback sessions, the 
opening of the football season recalls to a local trio 
days when they were engaged in the pigskin game. 
To E. M. Brungart, of West Walnut street, C. Foster 
Benfer, of South Market street, and Milton P. Herman, 
of North Market street, memories of their playing days 
on Susquehanna University football teams are vivid. 

Milt Herman is numbered among the football 
greats at Susquehanna. He played on the varsity from 
1893 to 1899. Those six years were not the extent of 
Herman's playing, however. Following his graduation 
in 1899, Herman began teaching in the old Herman 
School House, near Kratzerville, and for two years 
following his graduation would sneak back to the 
University campus each Saturday during the football 
season to play with the varsity eleven. 

In those days, Herman continued, there were no 
forward passes, an attack of increasing popularity. 
In all plays, the ball was carried through the line, which, 
of course, necessitated powerful linemen. Herman 
was one of the line stalwarts, playing either guard or 
tackle. The ball was usually advanced by a ball 
carrier following a V-shaped formation, with the two 
guards drawn into the backfield to add greater power 
to the drive. 

While the forward pass as known today was a 
thing unheard of in Herman's time, those Susquehanna 
teams had their own version of a pass. The quarter- 
back, usually a smaller man, at a pile-up at the line 
of scrimmage, was simply picked up by the larger 
men and tossed through the air for the necessary 
yardage. 

Equipment was not furnished the players, as is 
the custom today. All playing paraphernalia was pur- 
chased by the team members themselves, which may 
have prompted Herman's saying, "In those days, we 
played more for the honor of Susquehanna." 

\ stiff test had to be passed before a player was 
for the first string team. The grid hopeful 



was handed the ball, told to go to the end of of the 
field, and run through the remaining members of 
die squad, stationed at various intervals down the 
striped field. If the prospective player was successful 
in eluding all the would-be tacklers, he was declared 
a varsity player. In those days at Susquehanna, no 
gymnasium afforded shower and locker facilities, and 
there was no track around which the players sprinted 
following the daily practices. Instead, the team ran 
a mile from the college grounds to die river and re- 
turned at the end of die workout. 

Susquehanna's schedule this year may seem dif- 
ficult, but look at the teams played in Herman's day: 
Army, Bucknell, Gettysburg, York and Philadelphia 
professional teams, Carlisle Indians, and Bloomsburg 
State Normal, now known as Bloomsburg State Teach- 
ers College. No set-ups in that schedule. 

Vividly lingers the recollection of the first Gettys- 
burg-Susquehanna game in Herman's mind, and small 
wonder! Gettysburg refused to recognize the local 
institution, and said it was too small and weak to play 
a college of its size. The boys from the Orange and 
Maroon were called the Cornhuskers by the Gettys- 
burg aggregation, who had no end of sport, before 
the game, with the supposed country yokels from Sel- 
insgrove. 

All this kidding aroused the ire of the local team, 
and they vowed vengeance during the game. On the 
opening kickoff, the ball came to Herman, who tucked 
the pigskin under his arm and jaunted to the one-yard 
line before he was stopped. On the next play Sus- 
quehanna scored, and they added two more touch- 
downs while holding Gettysburg scoreless. While no 
"dirty" football was played, so hard fought was the 
contest that six of Herman's opponents were knocked 
out before the final whistle was sounded. The victor- 
ious team members were met by a large delegation at 
Selinsgrove Junction and escorted to town by the happy 
throng. 

Bloomsburg Normal, Herman recalled, had a play- 
er with a wooden leg, and the afflicted man used that 
artificial limb to unfair advantage. After several Sus- 
quehanna men had been laid low by the ..illegal wield- 
ing of that leg, Herman told Dr. George E. Fisher, 
manager of that team that that player should be re- 
moved from the game, because only two or tluee sub- 
(Continiuil on page IS) 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



p\* 



V 






W 



Charter members of the new Sports Hall of Fame were introduced on the field at Homecoming. 



Sports Hall of Fame — Where Are They Now? 



William M. Rearick '94, tackle, 
Carlisle, Pa., r et i r e d Lutheran 
minister. 

Milton P. Herman '99, guard, de- 
ceased. 

II. Richard Kauffman '09, fullback, 
deceased. 

William E. Swoope '16, fullback, 
deceased. 



George W 
ceased. 



Cassler '20. end, de- 



Lawrence M. Baker '22, tackle, 
Dunedin, Fla., retired business ex- 
ecutive. 

Harry F. Sweeney '23. halfback, 
deceased. 

Chester J. Rogowicz '24, fullback. 
Pottsville. Pa., retired school teach- 
er and coach. 

Kenneth M. Cassell '28, tackle, 
Harrisburg. Pa., retired teacher 
and coach. 

John II. Wall '30, quarterback, 
Freeport, 111., president of Servel, 
Inc. 

Stephen J. Martinec '35, halfback, 
Coaldale, Pa., science teacher at 
Panther Valley High School, Lans- 
ford. Pa., and sports official. 



Peter Shuty '38, tackle, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., head of business department, 
Neville Township High School. 

Harry C. Swopc '38, tackle, Irving, 
Tex., teacher at Irving Higli School. 

Robert M. Bastrcss '39, halfback, 
Selinsgrove, Pa., associate profes- 
sor of education. Susquehanna 
I Diversity. 

Samuel S. Fletcher '41, tackle. 
Northumberland, Pa., assistant di- 
rector of Veterans Administration 
Hospital at \\ ilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Joseph F. Greco '41. end. Mt. 
Carmel, Pa., physician. 

Blair L. Heaton '42. end, deceased. 

Lawrence M. Isaacs '43. halfback, 
Armonk, N.Y., vice president and 
controller. Radio Corporation of 
America. 

John E. Zubak '43. quarterback, 
Hammond, Ind., industrial rela- 
tions division, American Oil Com- 
pany. 

E u g e n e L. Fenstermacher '52, 
fullback, Sunbury, Pa., Allied 
Chemical Corp., Sunbury. 



James M. Rising '54, end, Selins- 
grove, Pa., estimator, Stan Seiple, 
Inc., Sunbury. 

Richard N. Young '54, halfback, 
Northumberland, Pa., biology 
teacher. Shikellamy High School, 
and radio sports announcer. 

Richard Purnell '58, quarterback, 
Sunbury, Pa., mathematics teacher 
and head football coach. Shikel- 
lamy- High School. 

Raljili W. Ferraro '60, center, Col- 

onia, N.J., assistant football and 

head baseball coach, \Vagner Col- 
lege, Staten Island, N.Y. 

Benedict DiFrancesco '62, guard, 
Doylestown, Pa., assistant football 
coach, Delaware Valley College. 

Larry G. Kerstetter '64, fullback, 
Port Trevorton, Pa., mathematics 
teacher and assistant football 
coach, Shikellamy High School. 

John Rowlands '64, center, \Yilkes- 
Barre, Pa., teacher and assistant 
football coach, Coughlin High 
School. 

Larry G. Erdman '65, halfback, 
North Wales, Pa., computer de- 
partment, Stainless, Inc. 



FALL 1967 



17 



stitutes were carried with the team. Over the man- 
ager's protests, Herman vowed to take care of that 
player. Shortly after that, the Susquehanna star saw 
his opportunity, grabbed the offender by his long hair, 
whirled him about in the air, and when the Blooms- 
burger landed his wooden leg stuck in the ground. 
The Normalite did not participate in the game after 
that. 

Clarence Weymouth, football star and Beau Brum- 
mel of Bucknell in the days of the cape sweaters, and 
"Dutch" Yeakel, a fellow teammate, were others who 
thought Herman an easy mark. With Bucknell on the 
offense, Weymouth said to Yeakel, while pointing to 
Herman, "Let's go through that big Dutchman over 
there." 

That remark aroused Milt's ire, and he replied, 
"Choost come on, dot's easy." 

On the play, with guard back, Herman yanked 
Weymouth to die ground and nibbed his Beau Brum- 
mel-ish nose in the dirt. Then he grabbed Yeakel, 
spun him around in the air and threw him for a five- 
yard loss. 

Two pictures, one of the Susquehanna University 
football team of 1896, the other of the 1898 varsity, 
are prized possessions of E. M. Brungart, of West 
Walnut street, tackle and halfback of the college team 
from 1895 to 1900. 

Brungart, in his memories of gridiron days, agreed 
with Herman diat die first Gettysburg game was out- 
standing in his football career. His recollections of 
the Carlisle games, however, are noteworthy. Those 
first Americans played hard, but clean football, and 
their powerful bodies in those pigskin battles when 
strength was the main forte most often resulted in 
Carlisle winning by about 40-0, he said. 

J. L. Ford, now a Methodist minister, was coach 
of the Orange and Maroon during Brungart's playing 
days. Other well known persons on die team then 
include Brungart's brother, Herbert I. Brungart, of 
Columbus, Ohio; Murray Herman, of Marcus Hook, 
brother of the Misses Beatrice, Eva, and Phoebe Her- 
man, of West Independence Street; Dr. L. L. Iseman, 
a physician now residing in Chicago; Dr. H. D. 
Hoover, now professor at the Gettysburg Theological 
Seminary; Dr. Harry C. Michael, of Johnstown, quar- 
terback of the team and now a member of the Board 
of Directors at the Selinsgrove college; and W. W. 
Spigelmyer, of Mifflinburg, former principal of Sel- 
insgrove public schools. All the above mentioned 
persons were members of the 1898 Susquehanna team, 
while die late E. R. Wingard, of Selinsgrove, was an 
outstanding player on the 1896 varsity. 

ose pictures show die players wearing shin 

s similar to the protectors present-day baseball 

se. A contraption similar to a padded ear 



guard was worn to prevent cauliflower ears, and some 
players wore nose guards. Shoes with several thick- 
nesses of leather, the top layer notched to prevent 
slipping, as well as other equipment, were purchased 
by the individual players. 

Many fond and humorous memories were recalled 
by C. Foster Benfer, of South Market street, diminu- 
tive quarterback, captain of the 1904 team, and de- 
fensive star, who terminated his several seasons of play 
in 1906. 

One of the first workouts which the college team 
experienced was a mere five-mile jaunt, with each team 
member striving to finish first in that marathon. The 
squad trotted from the University campus to the 
Broad street intersection, thence north to the Ott 
School House at Penn Avon, from there to the general 
store at Salem, to the college. Strenuous workouts and 
a diet composed largely of raw beef and milk provided 
sufficient stamina for the arduous football campaigns. 

Throughout his playing years, Benfer's heaviest 
weight was 130 pounds. Despite that, he was greatly re- 
spected as a vicious tackier. His first night of football 
training was spent with the "scrubs" and following that 
workout, Coach Lang instructed him to report for 
varsity drill the next night. After only two drills with 
the varsity, Benfer played the game on his fourth night 
of the season against Penn State. Scrimmage was held 
every night with the exception of Friday, and some- 
times, Monday. 

Sincerity with which college teams regarded the 
football sport was illustrated in the game between 
Susquehanna and Franklin and Marshall College, 
played at Sunbury. Dr. Hoover, now the theological 
instructor, played that entire contest, although battered 
and bruised throughout the fray. At the end of the 
game, he collapsed from exhaustion. 

The 1904 game between Susquehanna and Gettys- 
burg was outstanding in the memory of Benfer. The 
late George D. Winner, brother of Ralph Witmer and 
Calvin A. Witmer, of Selinsgrove, a halfback on the 
Orange and Maroon team, early in the game spurted 
his wav through the visitors for a touchdown. Gettys- 
burg, however, protested so strenuously that the Sus- 
quehanna eleven withdrew their claim to that score. In 
a short time later, however, Witmer duplicated his 
feat, and the Gettysburg team, to avert what must 
have appeared an overwhelming defeat, walked off 
the field 

Once in a while when the Orange and Maroon ran 
short of substitutes, the coach merely doffed his jacket 
and entered the fray, as did Coach Lang in a game 
played at Lafayette College. And to add insult to 
injury, the Susquehanna coach jumped over die line, 
snatched the ball from the opposing quarterback's 
hands, and ran 95 vards for a touchdown! 



18 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Susquehanna Revisited 



Mr. Wagner '26 served for 44 years as 
a teacher, principal and administrator 
in public schools. He retired from the 
post of assistant county superintendent 
of the Mifflin County (Pa.) Schools in 
the spring of 1966 and then accepted 
a one-year appointment to the Susque- 
hanna faculty during the sabbatical leaves 
of two members of the university's Ed- 
ucation Department. In this article, Mr. 
Wagner (now teaching at Kansas State 
Teachers College, Emporia, Kans.) de- 
scribes some of the changes that have 
taken place at S.U. during the past four 
decades. 



by Orren Wagner 



After serving forty-four years in public education, 
it has been an unusually pleasant experience for me 
to complete a terminal appointment as visiting assis- 
tant professor of education at Susquehanna. This was 
during the 1966-67 academic year, forty years after 
graduating from Susquehanna in 1926. 

By serving that year in place of faculty members 
on leave, I have had the unique opportunity to observe 
the changes, both visible and invisible, that have 
taken place during this period of time. 

The visible changes are readily apparent — the 
growth of the student body, the additional facilities, 
the increase in services and the like. I would want to 
say at this point, that the administration is doing a 
marvelous job. Everything seems to tick like a clock. 
The President seems to know how to surround himself 
with the right kind of people. 

In 1926 Susquehanna was a college but tried to 
run itself like a university. Now it is actually a univer- 
sity but tries to run itself like a college, which might 
be a sensible solution. By that I mean no separate 
schools but instead separate departments. 

In 1926 there was nothing wrong with the quality 
of the faculty. Those dear old professors were well 
educated and they laid the foundation for the academic 
excellence on the campus today. The difference was 
that they were grossly underpaid and worked much 
harder for what they received. The policy in those 
days was that the services of the faculty should relate 
to the surrounding community. Faculty members were 
constantly engaged in speaking, teaching extension 
classes and serving schools and churches all over 



Central Pennsylvania. It is regrettable that this general 
relationship does not exist today. 

Susquehanna forty years ago was truly a church 
college in every sense of the word. We went to chapel 
every day and liked it. The Bible was the authority 
around the place with no thought of this new theology 
business. The purpose of the institution was to train 
young people for Christian service. Now since Sus- 
quehanna is moving toward a church related college, 
its purpose is not clearly defined. 

In the old days Susquehanna, the same as other 
small colleges, was hard put to keep up its enrollment. 
As a result, the make-up of the student body was not 
as selective as at present. One has to actually teach 
here to understand the academic excellence of the 
student body today. Teaching and learning in depth 
is commonplace at Susquehanna. These students are 
really motivated. 

Of course Susquehanna has had its share of stu- 
dent unrest but no more than at other colleges. Presi- 
dent Weber and Dean Beuning have handled these 
situations very well. In my day we had just as many 
gripes and gripers, but it wasn't the style to say too 
much too loud. 

In my book, Susquehanna is a marvelous place 
to go to college. Every alumnus should be proud to 
have been here. There is just one thing wrong and 
that is the lack of that green stuff called money. In the 
light of rising costs the administration will reach a limit 
to cutting expenses. This is the big dilemma which 
stands out like a sore thumb as I have observed it. 
Perhaps the alumni can do a little more in die way of 
contributions. 






FALL 1967 



19 



CLUB 
NEWS 



LEHIGH VALLEY 

The annual fall dinner meeting 
of the Lehigh Valley District Club 
was held Saturday, Oct. 21, at the 
Holiday Inn, Bethlehem, with 20 
persons attending. Harold Kramer 
'48 conducted a business meeting 
during which the group elected 
officers. New officers are Dr. Nev- 
in Shaffer '49, president; Margaret 
Ide Macguire '33, vice president; 
and Corinne Kahn Kramer '45, sec- 
retary-treasurer. Buss Carr brought 
greetings from the university and 
discussed the present development 
on campus. Dr. Charles '27 and 
Dorothy Rothermel Chaffee show- 
ed slides of their recent trip to 
Europe. 

PITTSBURGH 

The Pittsburgh District Club 
met on Saturday, Sept. 23. Sixteen 
persons attended and went to the 
Waynesburg football game. Fol- 
lowing the game, the group held a 
dinner meeting at the Waynesburg 
Restaurant. President Pete Shut)' 
'38 introduced Ron Berkheimer, 
director of public information at 
S.U., who brought everyone up to 
date on the building program and 
talked briefly about the university's 
athletic teams. Committees were 
then appointed to make plans for 
the annual spring dinner meeting. 



ALUMNI 
WEEKEND 
MAY 3-5 




Susquehanna's freshman class includes 38 relatives of alumni. Sons and daughters 
in the photograph above are Linda Maier I Esther Seitzinger Maier '41), John Ruhl 
(William '49 and Bessie Bathgate Ruhl '48), Elizabeth Scott (Ruth Jones Scott '38), 
George W. Herrold (Warren Herrold '41), Barry Duceman (John Duceman '54), 
Sara Pritchard (Roland and Mary Jane Kehler Pritchard, both '36), Margaret Fisher 
(Robert F. '40 and Miriam Miller Fisher '39), and Kathy Fairchild (Lee and Janet 
Leitzel Fairchild, both '32). Other relatives in the photograph below are, first row: 
Donna Mackey, Lynn Williams, Shirley Clark, Bonnie Rapp, Roxanne Havice, Pearl 
Barabas, Jill Heffelfinger. Second row: Kathi Ecenbarger, Nancy Wright, Linda Ness, 
Ann Hilbish, Janet Goodyear, Virginia Shafer. Third row: Christine Grodem, James 
Price, Carl Lindborg, William Landes, Margaret McAndrew, Bruce Bengtson. Fourth 
row: Kenneth Vermillion, William Spory, Gregory Taylor, William Kline, William 
Stai.kiewicz, Stephen Decker. Fifth row: John Costenbader, Thomas Hutchinson, 
Daniel Keller, John Fay. Sixth row: Timothy Byrnes, Leonard Burns, David Stover. 
Missing were Thomas Allen, Roger Cheney, Richa-d Farnow, Peggy Haas, Richard 
Heinbach, and Thomas Shade. 





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20 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Susquehannans 
On Parade 



'15 

Alice F. Weaver is a part-time teach- 
er at Manor Junior College, Jenkintown, 
Pa., teaching medical and legal short- 
hand. 

'17 

Phoebe C. and Eca P. Herman 'IS 
were cited by First Lutheran Church, 
Selinsgrove, for their 45 years as Sunday 
School teachers. 

'20 

Dr. Russell F. Auman retired at the 
close of the 1986-67 school year as pro- 
fessor of practical theology at Hamma 
School of Theology, Wittenberg, Univer- 
sity, Springfield, Ohio. He was the speak- 
er at Commencement exercises in May 
and had been a member ci the faculty 
since 1953. 

Dr. Joseph L. Hackenherg has retired 
as professor emeritus and consultant at 
Moravian College. This is his second 
"retirement." Eleven years ago he re- 
tired as superintendent of the Shamokin 
(Pa.) Schools. 

'22 

Miles E. Hoffman has retired from 
the faculty of Temple University where 
he has taught since 1926. He was a 
specialist in labor relations and legisla- 
tion. For a number cf years, he also 
was a labor arbitrator. 

# 24 

Mary K. Potteiger has retired after 43 
years on the faculty at Susquehanna. 
She taught piano and music theory. Pres- 
ently, she is teaching a few private 
lessons and she is a frequent visitor to 
the campus. 

'25 

Dr. Roger M. Blough has been select- 
ed Industrialist of the Year by the So- 
ciety of Industrial Realtors. He was also 
interviewed for a feature story which 
appeared in Nation's Business. 

Dr. Christie E. Zimmerman continues 
her missionary work in India. She sent 



a student, Nona Devasahayam '70, from 
India to the university last year. Dr. 
Zimmerman's address is Mangalaman- 
dirain, Cuntur-1, India. 

'26 

Orren R. Wagner is teaching and 
supervising student teachers in second- 
ary education at Kansas State College, 
Emporia, Kan. 

# 27 

Seth P. Gustin retired last June after 
19 years as supervising principal of the 
Mercer (Pa.) Joint Schools. He was 
honored at a dinner given by school 
personnel. 

Dr. John F. Lewis was presented with 
an engraved key from the National 
Scouting Service Fraternity. The occa- 
sion was the 50th anniversary reunion 
of Troop 3 at Sunbury. Dr. Lewis is 
believed to have been die first Eagle 
scout of what was then the Sunbury 
Boy Scout Council. 

'29 

Dr. Harold N. Moldenke has resigned 
as director of the Trailside Nature and 
Science Center, Watchung Reservation, 
Mountainside. N.J., and is now associate 
pn fessor of natural science in the grad- 
uate division of Paterson State College, 
Wayne, N.J. 

'33 

Col. William R. Swarm was honored 
last April at the 20Ui annual conference 
of the Military Government Association 
in Washington, D.C. He received the 
association's annual award for major 
contributions in the field of civil affairs. 
He is employed by the Office of Emer- 
gency Planning. 

'34 

Dr. Henry H. Cassler was installed 
last spring as secretary of the Depart- 
ment of Institutional Chaplaincy and 
Clinical Pastoral Education, Division of 
Welfare Services, Lutiieran Council in 
the United States. The Rev. Marlin C. 
Bottiger, also '34, assistant to the presi- 



dent of the Central Pennsylvania Synod, 
Lutheran Church in America, was the 
installing officer. Dr. Cassler lives in 
Montclair, N.J. 

'39 

Kathryn R. Meyer has taken a posi- 
tion as executive director of the High 
Point (N.C.) Y.W.C.A. 

'40 

Florence Landback Latsha is teach- 
ing English and speech at William Penn 
High School, Harrisburg, Pa. She lives 
at 3227-B Wakefield Rd., Harrisburg. 

'42 

Sanford P. Blough has been elected 
vice president and comptroller of the 
Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsylvania, 
with headquarters in Philadelphia. Since 
1965 he had served as data systems ad- 
ministrator in the comptroller's organiza- 
tion at A. T. &T. in N.Y. 

John D. Ickes of Allentown was named 
centers coordinator of the Community 
Action Committee of Lehigh Valley. 
The new position was created with the 
establishment of neighborhood centers 
in Easton, Bethlehem and Allentown. 

Gerald S. Leib is a service foreman 
•for the Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsyl- 
vania, Harrisburg. He has been with 
Bell for 27 years. 

'44 

Dr. George M. Bass is the author of 
a new book dealing with the revitaliza- 
tion of the sermon. Entitled The Re- 
newal of Liturgical Preaching, the book 
was published by the Augsburg Publish- 
ing House of Minneapolis. 

'45 

Harold R. Snyder has been named 
assistant director of field services of the 
National Multiple Sclerosis Society, with 
offices in New York City. 

x'46 

Thomas R. Scanlan Jr. has been ap- 
pointed vice president, marketing of 
new industrial products division, An- 



FALL 1967 



21 



heuser - Busch, Inc. He was formerly 
vice president for the com refining divi- 
sion . 

'47 

Martin W. Maneval has been appoint- 
ed trust officer of the Snyder County 
Trust Co. in Selinsgrove. 

'48 

Harriet Gould Mertz is one of 43 par- 
ticipants from 30 states in the Faculty 
Development Institute at George Pea- 
body College for Teachers, Nashville, 
Tenn. The nine-month institute, design- 
ed to strengthen faculties in institutions 
of higher education across the nation, 
will continue until June. 

Russell H. Williams, formerly band 
director at Bishop McDevitt High School, 
Harrisburg, is now elementary instru- 
mental music instructor for the Harris- 
burg School District. He instructs stu- 
dents in several elementary schools. 

'49 

Edith Wegner Hebel was elected vice 
president of the Central Pennsylvania 
Lutheran Church Women at a confer- 
ence at S.U. 

James B. Peters is assistant professor 
of guidance and assistant football coach 
at Kutztown State College. He formerly 
coached and taught at Loyalsock High 
School, near Williamsport, Pa. 

'50 

The Rev. Robert A. Miller was in- 
stalled this summer as pastor of Holy 
Trinity Lutheran Church in Berlin, Pa. 
He was at St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 
Williamsport, before going to Berlin. 

Jane Bollinger Schroeclter is a kinder- 
garten teacher in the Waynesboro ( Pa. ) 
School District. 

'53 

Robert J. MacNamara is assistant pro- 
fessor of secondary education and super- 
visor of student teachers at Kent State 
University, Kent, Ohio. 

x'54 

Gilbert E. Davis was recently elected 
supervisor of special education for Bed- 
ford and Fulton counties. He supervises 
county shool programs for the excep- 
tional child. He and his wife and four 
children live at Alum Bank, Pa. 

'55 

The Rev. Edgar W. Oestreich is pastor 
of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of 
St. Philip, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

'57 

Elwood H. Cox Jr. is a district man- 
for the Scott Paper Co. His ad- 
dress is .43 Leyte Dr., San Antonio, 
Tex. 




A party for Susquehanna freshmen at the home of the Rev. Ralph I. '36 and Mrs. 
Shockey of Moorestown, N.J. Alumni hosted 1 1 parties for incoming freshmen during 
July and August. 



x'57 

Carol J. Hetherington returned to her 
regular teaching position in the Los 
Nietos (Calif.) School District after a 
year of teaching in Napier, New Zea- 
land, for which she had been awarded 
a Fulbright grant. 

'58 

Richard H. Calm has been appointed 
administrative assistant, for curriculum 
and personnel, to Dr. Ralph C. Geigle 
'35, superintendent of the Reading ( Pa. ) 
School District. 

Lt. James A. Keiser is assigned to 
duty with the U.S. Navy in Norfolk, 
Va. His wife and family moved with 
him from Kingsville, Tex. 

Dr. Glen E. Smith and his wife have 
moved from Mercer's Island, Washing- 
ton, to Galveston, Tex., where he has 
been assigned to the United States 
Public Health Service Hospital. 

Dr. James W. Wright was released 
from active duty with the U.S. Navy 
in June. He is practicing medicine in 
Somerset, Pa. His address is Friedens 
R.D. 2, Pa. 

'59 

Jack E. Cisney is assistant professor 
of business administration, teaching ac- 
counting and economics at West Liberty 
State College, Wheeling, W. Va. Last 
summer he received a National Science 
Foundation grant to do graduate work- 
in economics at the University of Ark- 
ansas. 

Harry L. Clark Jr. of Hatboro, Pa., 
was named assistant principal of Upper 



Perkiomen High School, East Greenville, 
Pa. He had been supervisor and coor- 
dinator of vocal music in the Abington 
Township School District. 

Richard A. Neff is employed by Trans 
World Airlines as director of audit. He 
and his wife, the former Margaret 
Pattyson '59, are living in New Canaan, 
Conn. They have two sons, aged 7 
and 4. 

'60 

The Rev. Richard D. Reichard is 
serving as chaplain of the National 
Lutheran Home in Washington, D.C. 

Dr. Larry W. Updegrove is practicing 
dentistry in York, Pa. Before locating 
in York, he was stationed at Keesler 
Air Force Base in Mississippi. 

'61 

Marvin L. Brubaker is an assistant 
professor of mathematics at Moravian 
College, Bethlehem, Pa. He had been 
on the faculty at Susquehanna. 

Paul W. Harter has been promoted 
to superintendent, special casualty ac- 
counts underwriting, at the Charlotte, 
N.C., casualty and surety division office 
of Aetna Life and Casualty. 

Robert E. Leighty is employment of- 
ficer at Emory University, Atlanta, Ga. 
He and his wife, the former Joan 
Lawley '62, and their family are living 
at 4120 Peachtree Rd., Apt. 4-C, Atlanta. 

'62 

Judith A. Bice has joined the music 
faculty of Susquehanna as a part time 
lecturer in music. In addition, she 
teaches instrumental music in the Lew- 
isburg ( Pa. ) Schools. 



22 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



James H. Parker is teaching physics 
at the University of Maine, where he 
also is studying for his Ph.D. His wife, 
the former Barbara R. Lovett '64. is 
teaching English at Orono High School. 
Their address is 25-E. University Park. 
Orono. Me. 

'63 

George F. Amerman has been elected 
president of Sunbury Foods, Inc. He 
was pre\iously associated with the ac- 
counting firm cf Ernst and Ernst. 

James C. Black was named by the 
board of directors. First National Bank 
of Sunbury, to the newly created posi- 
tion of auditor of the bank. 

George J. Campbell resigned from his 
former position as traffic manager of 
The Fashions department store, Colum- 
bus. Ohio, and is now purchasing analyst 
for the Xewark | Ohio i plant of Kaiser 
Aluminum and Chemical Co. He and 
his wife, die former Gay Bouchard '62, 
are living at 5043 Harbor Blvd., Colum- 
bus. Mrs. Campbell is a reading special- 
ist for the Columbus Public Schools. 

Capt. John H. Krohn was awarded the 
Army Commendation Medal for excep- 
tionally meritorious service with the 26th 
Army Corps, Indiantown Gap. He has 
since been reassigned to Vietnam. 

Eluood B. Hippie Jr. has completed 
his one-year internship at Grace Lu- 
theran, Fort Dodge, Iowa, and is now 
in his final year at the Gettysburg Sem- 
inary. 

Lt. Robert S. McKec has graduated 
with a master cf science degree in 
logistics management from the A i r 
Force Institute of Technology at Wright- 
Patterson A.F.B.. Ohio. One of 115 
government officials and military of- 
ficers selected for the 12-month course, 
he has been assigned to duty in Viet- 
nam. 

'64 

Peter Beigcr played the central role 
of "Smitty" for several weeks in the 
long-running off-Broadway drama "For- 
tune and Men's Eyes." Beiger and 
other members of the cast which per- 
formed with him also gave a number 
of performances in Toronto, Canada, 
and were scheduled to begin the filming 
of a movie version in Toronto this month. 

Bruce T. Sabin has joined the manage- 
ment training program of Boston Gas. 
He was formerly assigned to the com- 
pany's volume sales department. He 
and his wife, the former Leslie C. 
Bridgens '65, live at 5118 Washington 
St.. West Roxbury, Mass. 

Capt. Michael C. Voiles has returned 
to the United States after 13 months in 



Vietnam. He is now stationed at Camp 
Pendleton. Calif. 

J u d i t h Jantzer Keyes is teaching 
English at Line Mountain Junior High 
School, Trevorton, Pa. 

x'64 

Carole Ann Aichele has graduated 
■from Drexel Institute of Technology with 
a B. S. in home economics. She is 
teaching at the Abraham Le\itt Junior 
High School, Willingboro, N.J. 

'65 

Lt. Stacy L. Bottiger, son of the Rev. 
Marlin C. Bottiger '34, has been com- 
missioned a second lieutenant in the 
U.S. Air Force. He is attached to the 
35th Air Division at Hancock Field, 
Syracuse, N.Y., where he is training as 
a weapons controller for the XORAD 
SAGE weapons system. 

Ens. Arthur F. Bowen lias graduated 
from submarine school at New London. 
Ccnn. He is assigned to the U. S. S. 
Carp, based at Norfolk. Va. 

Lt. Edward J. Pokomicky. assigned 
to the 118th Army Medical Co. at Cam 
Ranh Bay, Vietnam, has beon promoted 
from second to first lieutenant. 

Carolyn R. Robinson is teaching 
Spanish at James Monroe High School, 
Fredericksburg, Va. 



Judith Anne Smcdley is a program 
analyst for the Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion Administration, Wastington. D.C. 

'66 

Robert J. Campbell was commission- 
ed second lieutenant after graduating 
from the Infantry Officer Candidate 
School, Ft. Benning. Ga. 

Laura J. Estep is a medical editor 
and illustrator for the National Board 
of Medical Examiners, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Carolyn S. German is a civilian recrea- 
tion specialist with Army Special Sen- 
ices, assigned to duty in Germany and 
Italy. Her address is Schwaebisch Gmu- 
end Senice Club, Bisniark Kaserne. 
A. P.O. New York, N.Y. 09281. 

Thomas R. Gresh was commissioned 
second lieutenant upon graduation from 
Transportation Officer Candidate School 
at Ft. Eustis, Va, 

R. Peter Johnson and his wife have 
entered Peace Corps training for India. 

Margaret C. Orth is teaching music 
at Mifflinburg (Pa.) Junior-Senior High 
School. 

Richard G. Sanborn was commissioned 
second lieutenant upon graduation from 
Officers Candidate School at Ft. Eustis, 
Va. 



Advanced Degrees 



Robert B. Bechtel '62 earned die 
doctor of pliilosophy degree in social 
psychology from the University of Kan- 




SMITH 





MORRIS 



sas, which also granted him a masters 
degree in 1964. Dr. Bechtel is em- 
ployed as a research associate by the 
Institute for Community Studies at Kan- 
sas City. Mo., helping to design, super- 
vise and evaluate some of the city's 
poverty programs. Recently, the U.S. 
Patent Office granted him a patent for 
die Hodometer, a system of recording 
foot movements in a room. His dis- 
sertation was based on his work with 
the Hodometer. 

William A. Elmer '60 has completed 
the requirements for the doctor of phil- 
osophy degree at the University of Con- 
necticut. He earned the master of 
science degree at New Mexico High- 
lands University in 1963. His doctoral 
dissertation, dealing with hereditary 
chondrodystrophy, is entitled: "Exper- 
imental Analysis cf the Creeper Con- 
dition in Chickens." Dr. Elmer is pres- 
ently on a two-year National Institutes 
of Health postdoctoral fellowship at The 
Oak Ridge ( Tenn. ) Laboratory. He is 
married to the fcrmer Marcella Gonzales. 
They have two young sons. 



FALL 1967 



23 



A I a r y Lou Ernst '58 received the 
elector of philosophy degree in biochem- 
istry from Yale University. Her dis- 
sertation is entitled: "The Mechanism 
of the Reaction of an Isoimide with 
Nucleophilic Reagents." She also earn- 
ed the M.D. degree from Temple Uni- 
versity School of Medicine in 1962. 

L. Daniel Inners v'6'1 was granted the 
doctor of philosophy degree in biophys- 
ics at the University of Pittsburgh. 
His doctoral dissertation is: "On Prob- 
lems Related to the Structure of Vir- 
uses.' He was awarded a grant for three 
years of postdoctoral study and research 
by the National Institute of Arthritic 
and Metabolic Diseases, National In- 
stitutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. Dr. 
Inners and his wife, the former Ruth 
Ross v'59, are the parents of three child- 
ren. His father, Lamar D., is associate 
professor of accounting at Susquehanna. 

Robert L. Morris x'53 earned the 
doctor of philosophy degree in history 
and political science from West Virginia 
University. His dissertation is a study 
of the role of the press in the creation 
of the government of West Virginia 
following its secession from Virginia. Dr. 
Morris also has a master's degree in 
Russian-American relations from Colum- 
bia University and is currently serving 
as director of the Center for Interna- 
tional Studies at Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania. In addition, he teaches 
courses in diplomatic history and Soviet 
politics and government and is executive 
secretary of the Pennsylvania Council 
for the Social Studies. 

Carlton B. Sm'.tli '60 was awarded 
the doctor cf philosophy degree in his- 
tory by the University of Virginia. His 
dissertation is entitled: "The United 
States War Department. 1815 - 1842." 
Dr. Smith is assistant professor of his- 
tory at York ( Pa. ) Junior College. He 
and his wife, the former Jacquelyn 
Cant: '62, have a young son, Andy. 

Anthony M. Padula '63 earned the 
doctor of medicine degree at Jefferson 
Medical College of Philadelphia. Dr. 
Padula is interning at Chestnut Hill 
Hospital, Philadelphia. 

Fred B. Dunkelherger '63 received 
the doctor of dental medicine degree 
from the University of Pennsylvania. 
He has begun postdoctoral training at 
the Eastman Dental Center in Rochester, 
N.Y., under a National Institute of 
Health fellowship. He will serve a three- 
year residency in pedodontics (children's 
dentistry) it the center. In addition, he 
will do research in dental physiology and 
work toward a master's degree in phy- 




INNERS 



PADULA 



PERFILIO 



DUNKELBERGER 




D. DELONG 



J. DELONG 




WALBORN 



CAIRNS 



siology at the Graduate School of Med- 
icine, University c«f Rochester. 

Charles S. Bailes '56 received the 
doctor of dental medicine degree from 
Harvard University in June. He has 
been licensed to practice in Massachu- 
setts and will specialize in orthodontry. 
Lt. Cdr. Bailes has spent 11 years in 
the U.S. Navy as a pilot, serving tours 
of duty aboard the aircraft carriers Mid- 
way, Coral Sea and Franklin D. Roose- 
velt. 

Wayne 11. Minamt '62 was awarded 
the doctor of dental surgery degree at 
Howard University College of Dentistry, 
Washington, D.C. A captain in the 
Dental Corps, U.S. Air Force, he is 
assigned to the U. S. A. F. Hospital. 
Wright-Patterson A.F.B., Ohio. 

Stanford C. Sholley '62 earned the 
degree of doctor of dental surgery at 
the Georgetown University School of 
Dentistry, where he was vice president 
of his class. 

Michael Cordas '63 was graduated 
from the Philadelphia College of Oste- 
opath) and Medicine and is now intern- 
ing at Community General Osteopathic 
Hospital, Harrisburg. 

Joseph P. Perfilio '63 earned the bach- 
elor of laws degree from Fordhani 




SEAKS 



J. PARKS 




CARR 



CHEW 



University Law School in June, ranked 
15th in a class of 200. Admitted to the 
Bar in both New Jersey and New York, 
he has been associated with the firm of 
Carluccio and Carluccio in Hoboken 
and was appointed by the office of the 
Public Defender as a defense attorney 
in the criminal prosecutions arising from 
the Newark riots. His wife, the former 
Marilyn Vekassy '63, is teaching French 
and Spanish at Scotch Plains-Fanwood 
(N.J.) High School. 

Paul W. Tressler '62 was admitted to 
practice law before the Montgomery 
County ( Pa. ) Bar last January. He re- 
ceived the bachelor of laws degree in 
1966 from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania Law School. Attorney Tressler 
is serving as law clerk to the Honorable 
J. William Ditter, Judge of Montgom- 
ery County Court of Common Pleas. He 
is married to the former, Judith Brndjar 
'62. They arc parents of a daughter. 

Alfred A. Ambrose 64 was installed 
as assistant pastor of First Lutheran 
Church, Altoona. Pa. in July by the Rev. 
Lester J. Karschner, S.T.M. '37. The 
Rev. Mr. Ambrose was graduated from 
Gettysburg Theological Seminar)' with 
the bachelor of divinity degree and re- 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



ceived clinical pastoral education at 
Harverford State Hospital. 

David L. DeLong '64 also was 
awarded the bachelor of divinity de- 
gree hy The Lutheran Theological Sem- 
inary at Gettysburg in May. His major 
field of study was the New Testament. 
He was ordained in his home church, 
Christ Lutheran of Elizabethtown. with 
his brother, the Rev. James A. DeLong 
'62. participating in the senice. Dave 
has been installed as pastor of the Scalp 
Level Lutheran Parish, which consists 
of two churches on the outskirts ol 
Windber. Pa. 

James A. DeLong '62 was graduated 
from The Lutheran Theological Sem- 
inary at Philadelphia last November and 
has begun work on his masters degree 
at Gettysburg Seminary. He is pastor of 
the Millville (Pa.) Lutheran Parish, 
consisting of St. Paul's and St. John's 
churches. He is married to the former 
Grace Ann Toothaker '6~, a music 
supervisor for the Millville Elementary 
Schools. 

Other S.U. graduates who received 
bachelor of divinity degrees from The 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Get- 
tysburg last spring are James T. Parks. 
Richard A. Seaks. Donald J. Seiple. and 
Robert J. N. Watborn, all '64. 

James T. Parks '64 is pastor of Zion 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, Zion Hill. 
Pa. His wife, the former Dena Sebas- 
tian 66. has been serving as a special 
education teacher in the Adams Count] 
(Pa.) School District. 

Richard A. Seaks 64 is assistant pus- 
tor of Ascension Lutheran Church. Balti- 
more. He and his wife, the former 
Susan Chapman '64 spent the past sum- 
mer in California where Pastor Si ,ik- 
received three months of clinical pas- 
toral education at Presbyterian Medical 
Center in San Francisco. 

Robert J. N. Walborn '64 is assistant 
pastor and director of Christian educa- 
tion at Evangelical Memorial Lutheran 
Church. Harrisburg. Among the par- 
ticipants in his ordination at Zion Lu- 
theran Church, Sunbury, Pa., were Dr. 
Robert W. Koons hc'58 and the Rev. 
Gilbert C. Askew '61. Pastor Walbom's 
wife is the former Mary Shay Wbitaker 
of Penn Yan, N.Y. 

Donald E. Dyer x'64 received the 
bachelor of science degree in electrical 
engineering from Pennsylvania State 
University. His wife is the former 
Lynn Manning '62. 

Susan Duerr Borgerdmg '65 earned 
the master of music education degree 
at Temple University. Her husband. 
Charles W. Borgerdmg Jr. '65, is work- 



ing toward the master's degree in psy- 
chology at Temple. 

Carol Ann Cairns '63 was granted the 
mister of education degree in guidance 
from Millersville State College. She is 
guidance counselor at Edward Hand 
Junior High School, Lancaster, Pa., 
where she was previously employed as 
an English teacher. 

Michael C. Carr '65 has completed 
the requirements for the master of scieni e 
degree in mathematics at Northeastern 
University. He is employed by Ray- 
theon Company, Bedford. Mass., as an 
engineer-programmer, and does systems 
analysis work on missiles. His wife, the 
former Diana Youngblood '66. is teach- 
ing music in a junior high school at 
Wayland, Mass. 

Barbara Ann Chew '65 earned the 
master of library science degree at 
Rutgers, The State University of New 
Jersey. 

Ned S. Coates '62 was awarded the 
master of arts degree from die Univers- 
ity of Arkansas, where he had a teach- 
ing assistantship. He is on the English 
fatuity at YVilliainsport (Pa.) Area 
Community College. 

Nellie Keller Dcardorff '63 earned the 
M.S. in education degree at Temple 




CERDING 





ZERBE 



JACOBS 



FINN 



VOGEL 



University. She is teaching at York 
(Pa.) Junior College. 

Barbara A. Deroba '63 received the 
master if public health degree in bio- 
statistics from the University of Michi- 
gan School of Public Health. Since then 
she has been employed by the Veterans 
Administration. Department of Medicine 
and Surgery, as a research statistician. 

Mary May Moore Finn '66 earned 
the master if education degree in guid- 
ance and counseling at Shippensburg 
State College. She is teaching elemen- 
tary and junior high instrumental 
music in the Chambersburg ( Pa. ) Pub- 
lic Schools. 

E. Ann Gerding '65 received the mas- 
ter of education degree from Lehigh 
University. She is currently teaching 
at the Variety Club School in Honolulu. 
a school for children, aged 4-8, with 
learning disabilities. In addition, she is 
taking further graduate work at the 
University of Hawaii. 

Edith II. GodshaU '65 received the 
master of education degree from Lehigh 
University and is teaching remedial 
reading in the Hazleton (Pa.) Area 
School District. She is taking additional 
postgraduate studies in reading at Le- 
high, working toward a reading special- 
ist certificate. 

Frederick C. Gninn '60 earned the 
MA. degree in theatre arts at Pennsyl- 
vania State University. Formerly head 
of the English Department at Hunting- 
don ( Pa. ) Area High School, he work- 
ed with a professional acting company 
at Penn State, appearing in three plays 
the company presented. He is presently 
teaching at Shikellamy High School. 



FALL 1967 



25 



Sunbury, Pa., and will coach the junior 
class play this year. 

Louis J. Heinze '58 earned the master 
of education degree from the University 
of Pittsburgh. He took a leave of ab- 
sence from his teaching position in the 
Richland School District, Johnstown, 
Pa., last spring and completed the cred- 
its for secondary principalship certifica- 
tion, also at the University of Pittsburgh. 

Alfred W. Jacobs Jr. '64 received the 
master's degree in social work from 
West Virginia University. He has re- 
turned to his employment with the 
Youth Development Center, Loysville, 
Pa., a residential treatment center for 
delinquent and emotionally disturbed 
boys. His wife, the former Patricia Anne 
Sparrow, also completed her graduate 
study in social work at the University 
of North Carolina. They are the parents 
cf an infant daughter, Melissa Annette. 

Linda Kay Leonard '61 was awarded 
the master of education degree in music 
by Pennsylvania State University. She 
is teaching vocal music in die elemen- 
tary schools of the East Lycoming Dis- 
trict in Hughesville, Picture Rocks, and 
Lairdsville, Pa. 

Lynn Lerew '63 received the master 
of music education degree from West 
Chester State College. He is director 
of instrumental music, band and orches- 
tra at Chambersburg (Pa.) Area Senior 
High School. 

Graydon I. Lose '54 was awarded 
the master of business administration 
degree by American University in Wash- 
ington, D.C and is with the Office of 
the Assistant Secretary of Defense. 

Glenn Wayne Miller '65 was awarded 
the master's degree in library science 
at Drexel Institute of Technology, Phil- 
adelphia. He is assigned to special serv- 
ices at Fort Benning, Ga. 

Ann Ellen Paielko '65 received tire 
M.S. degree in developmental psycho- 
logy from Purdue University, August 
1967. She has accepted a position with 
the University of Hawaii t" participate 
in a research evaluation project. 

Frances Ray '6.5 received the M.A. 
degree in physics from Williams College. 
She is teaching physics, for two years 
at Punahou, Honolulu, Hawaii, an in- 
dependent school offering courses of 
study from kindergarten through grade 
12. 

Barbara Jordan Schenck '63 earned 
the master of education degree in guid- 
anci and counseling at Shippensburg 
( ollege. She and her husband, 
Clark 64 are teaching at Cum- 

I'll High School, Bar- 
department and 



Spurgeon T. Shue Jr. '58 has received 

his certified public accountant certificate 
and is employed by Arthur E. Shue of 
Spring Grove, Pa., as a public account- 
ant. He is married to the former 
Doretha Ort. They are the parents of 
two children, Jeffrey and Pamela. 

Carol L. Viertel '66 was awarded the 
M.A. degree in teaching by John Hop- 
kins University. She has been teaching 
high school English in Baltimore County. 

George Vine '58 received the master 
of education degree in counseling from 
Lehigh University. 

William A. Vogel '65 earned the M.A. 
degree in special education, with a con- 
centration in mental retardation, at 
Newark State College. He was a stu- 
dent intern with the National Associa- 
tion for Retarded Children in New York 
City and headed a pilot program to 
teach swimming to aphasic children in 



the Union (N.J.) Campus School at 
Newark State. He is presently teaching 
edueable pre-adolescents at the Avon 
Avenue School in Newark. 

H. Nathan Ward '63 received the 
master of education degree in music 
education from Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity. He has taught instrumental 
music in the West Shore ( a Harrisburg 
suburb) School System since graduating 
from S.U. 

E. Michael Yohe '62 received the de- 
gree in pulp and paper technology from 
the University of Maine. He is employ- 
ed by P. H. Glatfelter, Co., Spring 
Grove, Pa., and was a company scholar- 
ship winner. Yohe married the former 
Vickie Lawler '64. 

Gary G. Zerbe '65 earned the master 
of education degree in psychology at 
Pennsylvania State University. He is 
a counseling psychologist at the Laurel- 
ton (Pa.) State School and Hospital. 



A True Tale of Spelunking 

by Lynn O. Ramer berances such as thighs, shoulders, 

Mr. Rentier '23 teaches mathematics etc -» etc - 

at L a w re nee Institute of Tech- 
nology in Detroit. 

On a nice Saturday, Dr. Harold 
N. Moldenke '29 ("Molly" — now 
zoology prof, Paterson State U.), 
S e t h Gustin '27, and Lynn O. 
Ramer "bummed" ( thumbed? ) 
their way to the Freeburg Cave 
— little explored — to see what 
they could see, by candlelight and 
EVERREADY. 

A crevice invited them and they 
emerged into a "room" as large as 
the former Steele Science Hall Aud- 
itorium. It was "dry as a bone!" 
Not a stalaCtite ("C" for ceiling) 
nor a stalaGtite ("G" for ground) 
therein! Just a heap of miry clay, 
red as iron. 

( Incidentally, "Pappy" Surface 
taught us all the "C" and "G" 
identity in the Natural Science 
Club, just then organized.) 

The exit was not easy, until we 
divested ourselves of all, smeared 
the frames with the gooey clay, 
and — even then — it took some 
squirming and scratching, draw- 
ing some blood on various protu- 



O n c e outside, nature was 
"weeping," so we "showered" in 
complete isolation — not a house 
or human in the area of the en- 
trance (a mere hole about 30" in 
diameter). 

What IF the exit hadn't been 
successful! The clothing would 
have rotted away, with the flesh, 
and "S. U. Spelunkers," A.D. 2500, 
woidd have all sorts of conjec- 
tures about the "prehistoric' skele- 
tons grinning away in Pennsyl- 
vania-New Jersey Dutch styles. 

No one wore a wrist watch, or 
any watch. (Couldn't afford to!) 
No one had a ball point. Even the 
EVERREADY would have van- 
ished! As for coins, no one had 
any either. Roy! Did we have fun! 

The Horton Dining Hall sand- 
wiches wouldn't have lasted much 
beyond 24 hours and no one had 
been appraised of our departure 
or destination. "Maw" Bitner, the 
cook, had sneaked the sandwiches 
to me as I had an "in" with hers 
truly! 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



"I Do 



f t 



FALK-BROOKE 
Susan Brooke to Bent Falk x'67 in the 
spring at Aarhus, Denmark. Mr. Falk 
was a Fullbright scholar at Wittenberg 
University in 1962-63 and the follow- 
ing year attended Susquehanna. He is 
presently a theology student at the Uni- 
versity of Aarhus. His wife attended 
Wittenberg and was graduated from 
Ohio State. She is an occupational thera- 
pist at Stadts Hospital. Risskov, Den- 
mark. Address: 13 Frederikshaldsgade, 
Aarhus, Denmark. 

AMEACHER-BRUMFIELD 
Susan Brumf.eld '67 to Bruce Irwin 
Ambaclier, March 18, All Hallo w s 
Episcopal Church, Wyncote, Pa. 
Susan Davis '66 was one of the brides- 
maids. Mrs. Ambacher is employed at 
the Institute for Cancer Research, Fox 
Chase, Pa. Her husband is a graduate 
assistant at Temple University, working 
toward the Ph.D. in history. The couple 
resides at 1808 Beech Ave., Melrose 
Park. Pa. 19126. 

POST-ARNOLD 

Joyce Marie Arnold '60 to Jeremiah 
B. Post, April 15, Christ Lutheran 
Church. Harrisburg, Pa. Joyce Spigel- 
mycr '5.9 was an attendant. Mrs. Post 
is acquisitions librarian at the Free 
Library of Philadelphia for a program 
for functionally illiterate adults and her 
husband is librarian of the map collec- 
tion. He has a master's degree from 
Columbia University. Address: 1319 
Lombard St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19147. 

WALk'ER-CROWL 

Sandra Lee Crowl '67 to Ens. William 
R. Walker '65, April 26, Union Luth- 
eran Church, York, Pa. Carl Campbell 
'65 served as best man. Sandy is teach- 
ing world literature and Spanish at Dal- 
lastown ( Pa. ) High School. She is liv- 
ing with her parents at 822 W. King 
St., York 17404 while Ens. Walker is 
serving with the Navy in DaNang, Viet- 
nam. His address is: Box 20, U.S. NAV 
SUPPACT, F.P.O. San Francisco, Calif. 
96695. 

PELKEY-CAMPBELL 

Patricia Campbell '60 to Roger V. 
Pelkey, June 3, First Methodist Church, 
Hartford, Conn. Pat is a social worker 
for the State Division of Child Welfare 
in Hartfcrd. Mr. Pelkey is a graduate 
rf the University of Hartford and is as- 
sociated with Pratt and Whitney Air- 
craft. The couple is living at 16 Henry 
St., Hartford 06114. 

FALL 1967 



WILLIAMS-ROBERTS 

Ruth Joyce Roberts '62 to Joseph A. 
Williams, June 3, St. Andrew's Chapel, 
Philadelphia. Ruth was employed by 
the University of Pennsylvania School 
of Medicine in the Department of Micro- 
biology. Her husband is a graduate of 
New York State University and is in 
his final year at the Philadelphia Divin- 
ity Schocl of the Episcopal Church. The 
address of the couple is: 4301 Spruce 
St., Apt. A-402, Philadelphia 19104. 
LEAP-TWEED 

Carolyn May Tweed '65 to Wayne 
E. Leap, June 3, First Methodist Church, 
Williamstown, N.J. Carolyn is employ- 
ed by Sun Oil Co. and Mr. Leap is with 
the Bell Telephone Co. The couple 
lives at Mansion Park, Apt. 1, Glass- 
boro, N.J. 08028. 

PAWLOSKI-HILLEGASS 

D : ane L. Hillegass '67 to Lt. Richard 
A. Pawhski '66, June 10, St. Pius X 
Church, Selinsgrove. Dick is serving 
with the U.S. Marine Corps and Diane 
is teaching in the Beauford (S. C.) 
School District. Address: MCAS, Cherry 
Point, N.C. 28533. 

SEBASTIAN-EVANS 

Ruth M. Ecans '27 to Jacob P. Sebas- 
tian, June 17, McSherrystown, Pa. Mrs. 
Sebastian lias been a teacher in the 
Mount Carmel (Pa.) Joint School Sys- 
tem. Address: 103 East Ave., Mount 
Carmel 17851. 

SCHNEIDER-MOYER 

Carolyn R. Moyer '63 to the Rev. Karl 
A. Schneider, June 24, Bethany Lutheran 
Church, Roxborough, Philadelphia. 
Carolyn is employed by the Philadelphia 
Board of Education as a social worker 
for the Pastcrius and Richard Allen 
Child Care Centers. The Rev. Mr. 
Schneider is pastor of Bethany Lutheran 
Church, Philadelphia. 19128. 
CONINE-COLE 

Linda Susan Cole '65 to Barry Brent 
Conine, July 1, St. James United Church 
of Christ, Allentown, Pa. /. Maris Stich- 
ler Goda '65 was an attendant. Linda 
is teaching third grade in Kingwood 
Township School, Frenchtown, N.J. Her 
husband is a linotype operator for Mack 
Printing Co., Easton. The couple re- 
sides at 924 Pursel St., Alpha, N.J. 
08865. 

BUELL-LOGAN 

Carol Ann Logan '67 to Thomas 
Richard Bit ell '66, July 1, Episcopal 
Church of the Advent, Kennett Square, 
Pa. Tom is in business with his father 
— Buell Oil Co., Inc., Geneseo, N.Y. 
KNIGHT-PFISTER 

Lynn Ppster '64 to Frank Knight Jr., 
July 1, Christ Lutheran Church, Flush- 



27 



ing, N.Y. Lynn is teaching French at 
Locust Valley Elementary School and 
her husband is employed by Popular 
Merchandising, Passaic, N.J. The couple 
lives at 69-35 A 186 Lane, Fresh Mead- 
ows, N.Y. 11365. 

SCHRADER-LYMAN 
Linda Susan Lyman x'70 to George 
Michael Schrader, July 22, First Baptist 
Church, Westfield, N.J. Among the at- 
tendants were Linda Covert '70 and 
Anne Gant '70. Mr. Schrader is a Naval 
electronics technician stationed at Lake- 
hurst Naval Air Station. 

SANDAHL-MESSER 
Nancy Louise Messer to James Filer 
Sandahl '64, July 15, Park Hill Church, 
Westmoreland, N.H. Mrs. Sandahl is 
a graduate of Keene State College and 
is teaching in Woodbridge, N.J. Jim 
teaches instrumental music at Avanel 
Junior High School, Woodbridge. Ad- 
dress: South Park Dr., Woodbridge, N. 
J. 07095. 

DUDLEY-HAACKE 
Joan Margaret Haacke to Frederick 
Lee Dudley '67, July 22, at the home of 
the bride's parents, Glen Ridge, N.J. 
Fred is an industrial engineer for Re- 
public Steel in Niles, Ohio 44446, where 
the couple resides at 1609 Robbins Ave., 
Apt. 15. 

D'ARCONTE-DEEBEL 
Jean Ann Deebel '63 to Gary Richard 
D'Arconte, July 29, St. John's Lutheran 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 






1967-68 




Winter Sports Schedules 






MEN'S BASKETBALL 




D 7 


"Scranton 


A 


D13 


Wagner 


H 


D18 


JV vs. Bucknell Frosh 


A 


D20 


"Scranton 


H 


D22 


Upsala 


A 


D27-28 


Highspire Tournament 


A 


.1 6 


"Delaware Valley 


A 


J 8 


"Albright 


H 


J io 


"Juniata 


H 


J 13 


Lehigh 


H 


J 26 


"Lycoming 


A 


J 29 


"Philadelphia Textile 


H 


F 3 


Wagner 


A 


F 7 


"Albright 


A 


F10 


"Elizabethtown 


A 


F14 


"Juniata 


A 


F16 


American 


A 


F19 


"Wilkes 


H 


F21 


Hofstra 


H 


F24 


Ithaca 


H 


F24 


JV vs. Luzerne Community 


H 


F26 


Delaware University 


H 


F26 


JV vs. Williamsport 
Commerce 


H 


F27 


Rider 


A 


"JV Preliminary 





Church, Ringtown, Pa. Mary Margaret 
Craft '63 served as organist. Jean is 
teaching business courses at Salisburg 
(Pa.) High School and her husband is 
employed by Volkert Allentown Inc., 
Allentown, Pa. The couple resides at 
513 Chew St., -Allentown 18102. 
PRITTS-BACON 

Barry Bacon x'69 to Dennis Merlin 
Pritts '69, Jul\- 29. St. John's Church, 
South Salem, N.Y. They reside in Lew- 
isburg, Pa. 

SCHEIB-BRINK 

Joanne Evelyn Brink '66 to Gary L. 
Scheib '66, July 29, Clarks Summit (Pa.) 
Methodist Church. Rhonda Bender '66 
served as maid cf honor and Dena Se- 
bastian Parks '66 was one of the brides- 
maids. Among the ushers were the Rev. 
James T. Parks '64 and Sheldon Fisher 
'66. Joanne pursued additional studies 
at Marywood College and is teaching 
at Centennial School District, Warmins- 
ter, Pa. Gary has begun his second year 
of study at Pennsylvania College of Op- 
tometry, Philadelphia. The couple lives 
at 6034 N. Warnock St., Philadelphia 
19141. 

TROUTMAN-BROWN 

Barbara Louise Brown '67 to David 
Renninger Troutman, J u 1 y 29, First 
Church of Christ, Wethersfield, Conn. 
Maryann Paylor Grube '67 was one of 
the bridesmaids. Eugene Shotsberger 
'67 was best man and John Troutman 
'66 an usher. Barbara is teaching at 



Crusader 




WRESTLING 




D 9 


Washington 


H 


D12 


Dickinson 


H 


D14 


Pembroke State 


H 


T 6 


Juniata 


A 


T 12 


Eastern Baptist 


A 


T 27 


Philadelphia Bible 


A 


F 3 


Bucknell 


A 


F10 


American 


A 


F17 


Delaware Valley 


H 


F21 


Hofstra 


H 


F27 


Wagner 


H 


M 1-2 


M.A.C. Tournament 
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 


A 


F 1 


Wilkes 


A 


F 9 


1 .ebanon Valley 


A 


F13 


Marywood 


H 


F15 


Millersville 


H 


F19 


Albright 


H 


F26 


Blooinsburg 


H 


M 1 


Millersville 


A 




Winter 






Sports 





West Snyder High School, Beaver 
Springs, Pa. Mr. Troutman served in the 
U.S. Army for two years and is associat- 
ed with his father and brother in the 
operation of Troutman's Gulf Service. 
The couple resides at 353 S. Market St., 
Selinsgrove 17870. 

WINTERS-STRAIN 

Laura Elizabeth Strain t.> Christopher 
L. Winters '65, July 29, Church of the 
Ascension, Williamsport, Pa. Chris is 
assistant superintendent cf Penn Cen- 
tral Containers Inc. 

GUNDAKER-WALSH 

Isabelle Walsh to Robert George Gun- 
daker '64, August 5, St. Michael's 
Church, Cranford, N.J. Mrs. Gundaker 
is teaching English at Governor Living- 
ston Regional High School, Berkley 
Heights, N.J. Bob is employed in the 
city investments department of Mutual 
Benefit Life Insurance Co., Newark. The 
couple is making their home at 38 South 
Gate Rd., Murray Hill, N.J. 07971. 
HAMPEL-FEGELY 

Siitoh Mary Fegely '67 to Paul Joseph 
Hampel 69, August 5. Paul is continu- 
ing his studies at S.U. The couple re- 
sides on 18th St., Selinsgrove 17870. 
HOWE-DEACON 

Barbara Joan Deacon to Richard Earl 
Howe Jr. '64, August 5, St. Paul's 
Church, Riverside, N.Y. Mrs. Howe at- 
tended the University of Bridgeport and 
is employed by IBM in Bridgeport, 
Conn. Dick is associated with the 
Arrow Co., New York City. Address: 
195 Hoydens Hill Rd., Fairfield, Conn. 
06430. 

REYNOLDS-SCHUMACHER 

Janet Marie Schumacher '67 to Doug- 
las Leonard Reynolds x'65, August 5, 
Calvary Lutheran Church, Cranford, N. 
J. Thomas Curtis x'64 and Robert Good 
'65 served as ushers. Janet is working 
for IBM and Doug is serving in the 
Army at Newark. The couple lives at 
260 E. Westfield Ave., Roselle Park, 
N.J. 07204. 

SNYDER CARSON 

Mary Jeanne Carson to Joseph Allen 
Snyder Jr. '64. August 5, St. Thomas 
Episcopal Church, Whitcmarsh, Pa. Jay 
is employed in the personnel depart- 
ment of the Governor's office at Harris- 
burg. The couple lives at R.D. 1, Mil- 
lersville, Pa. 17551. 

PACKER-BURGEE 

Diane Foster Burgee '70 to Daniel 
Leroy Packer, August 12, Church of 
the Redeemer, Baltimore, Md. Diane 
is attending Lock Haven State College 
and her husband, who attended Buck- 
nell, is employed by American Aniline 
Products, Inc. 



28 



PEARSON-MACK 

Marjorie Suzanne Mack '67 to Richard 
Eugene Pearson, August 12, Springfield 
Lutheran Church, Pleasant Valley, Pa. 
Cheryl Krapf '69 and Jane Speiser '67 
served as bridesmaids. Marjorie is a 
teacher of German and history at Penns- 
bury High School, Fallsington, Pa. Her 
husband is a senior at the University 
of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary 
Medicine. The couple resides at Penn 
Park Apts., Morrisville, Pa. 19067. 

ROBBINS-WOLF 
Regina Laura Wolf to Larry Clifton 
Rohlr.ns '61, August 12, Witmer's Evan- 
gelical United Brethren Church, Port 
Trevorton, Pa. Philip H. Schnee x'62 
was one of the ushers. Mrs. Robbins is 
an English teacher in die Baltimore 
County School System. Larry was a 
lieutenant in the Marine Corps and is 
now teaching chemistry at Perry Hall 
High School, Baltimore. The couple is 
residing at 14 11 -J Hadwick Dr., Balti- 
more 21221. 

VOTTERO-HIGGINS 
Margaret Mary Higgins to Francis 
Joseph Vottero '68, August 12, Church 
of Our Lady, Mount Carmel, Pa. The 
bridegroom is attending S.U. and the 
couple resides at 311 E. Center St., 
Mount Carmel 17851. 

ZERBE-HOFFMAN 

Joan Marie Hoffman '67 to Gary Gil- 
bert Zerbe '65, August 12, Clarks Sum- 
mit Methodist Church. Address: 735 
Buffalo Rd., Apt. A-2, Lewisburg, Pa. 
17837. 

BOONE-BANNISTER 

Susan L. Bannister '66 to Robert 
Boone. Susan is senior library assistant, 
Framingham ( Mass. ) State Teachers 
College. Address: 40 Summer St., West- 
boro, Mass. 01581. 

WALTMAN-BRANDT 

Marjorie Louise Brandt '64 to David 
C. Waltman, August 19, Lutheran 
Church of the Good Shepherd, Easton, 
Pa. Marjorie is teaching music in the 
Rosetree-Media School District near 
Philadelphia, Her husband is employ- 
ed by the Naval Facilities Engineering 
Command, Philadelphia, and is a grad- 
uate of Drexel Institute of Technology. 
The couple lives at 32 E. Stratford Ave., 
Lansdowne, Pa. 19050. 

HELW1G-BURNS 

Betty Lou Burns '64 to Samuel Roy 
Helwig, August 20, Church of the 
Brethren, Bunkertown, Pa. Among those 
serving as ushers was Roy II . Burns '61. 
Betty Lou is a teacher at Westerly Park- 
way Junior High School, State College, 
Pa. Her husband, a graduate of Wil- 

SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



liamsport Technical Institute, is em- 
ployed by HRB Singer Inc., State Col- 
lege. Address : Almar Acres Trailer 
Court, R.D., Centre Hall, Pa. 16828. 
CARTER-CORSOX 

Nancy Corson '65 to Albert Howard 
Carter III, August 26, St. Andrew 
Lutheran Church, Muncy, Pa. Both 
have XDEA-IY fell iwships and are 
studying far their doctorates at the Uni- 
versity of Iowa. Mr. Carter's studies 
are in comparative literature and Nancy's 
are in American civilization. In addi- 
tion, she is also teaching a class of rhet- 
oric. Their address is 311 S. Dodge 
St., Iowa City 52240. 

HOLMES-ERTEL 

Kathy G. Ertel to Charles A. Holmes 
'67 in August at Messiah Lutheran 
Church, Williamsport, Pa. Chuck is 
studying at Bucknell where he has a 
graduate assistantship in chemistry. 
KIRBY-KAUFFMAN 

Linda Sue Kauffman '67 to John H. 
Kirby III, August 26, St. John's Lutheran 
Church, Lewistown, Pa. The Rev. 
Robert G. Sander '40, pastor of the 
church, officiated. Christine Schlichting 
'87 was the maid of honor. The bride- 
groom is a graduate of Millersville State 
College. Both he and Linda are teach- 
ing in the Boyertown School system. 
Address: 433 E. Philadelphia Ave., 
Boyertown, Pa. 19512. 

LUDWIG-RUNK 

Mary Beth Runk '68 to Glenn E. Lud- 
wig '68, August 26„ St. Paul's Lutheran 
Church, Lititz, Pa. Joanne Goglia '68 
served as maid of honor. Dianne Harsh- 
man '68, Joanne Romano '68 and Judy 
Coman '68, were bridesmaids. Best 
man was W. Dean Bickel '68; vocalist, 
Peter Jarjisian '69; organist, Karen Vul- 
tee '67. Ushers were, /. Fred Lehr '68 
and Benjamin Larzelere '68. 
McCOY-YODER 

Barbara J. Yoder '60 to James V. Mc- 
Coy, August 26, Methodist Church, 
Millerstown, Pa. Barbara is a music 
teacher in the West Shore School sys- 
tem. Mr. McCoy is associated with 
tin- Martin Motor Sales Co. The couple 
resides at 1010 N. Second St., Harris- 
burg 17102. 

MILLER-YVAHLER 

Carolyn Virginia Wahler '67 to Rob- 
ert Reed Miller Jr. '67, August 26, First 
Presbyterian Church, Cranbury, N. J. 
Cindy Culp '67 served as one of the 
bridesmaids and William Wrege '67 as 
an usher. Robert Bortz '67 was soloist. 
Carolyn is a systems engineer trainee 
for IBM in Philadelphia. Bob is em- 
ployed as choral and instrumental teach- 
er in the Upper Dublin School District 



Dr. Russ Writes Booklet 



Dr. William A. Russ, professor of 
history at Susquehanna, is the author 
of a new volume in a series of pub- 
lications of the Pennsylvania Historical 
Association. 

Entitled "How Pennsylvania Acquired 
Its Present Boundaries," the 76-page 
booklet represents more than a decade 
of research by Dr. Russ. It was publish- 
ed as No. 8 in the "Pennsylvania His- 
tory Studies" series by die state Histor- 
ical Association. 

A member of the Susquehanna faculty 
since 1933, Dr. Russ will retire in the 
spring. Although their plans are indef- 
inite, he and Mrs. Russ may be leaving 
the community. 

Dr. Russ has informed the Alumni 
Office that he still has a number of cop- 
ies of his two-volume history on the 
annexation of Hawaii. Since he does 
not wish to "be bodiered with the de- 
tails" of selling them when he leaves 
the campus, he is willing to give free, 
autographed copies to alumni or other 
interested persons. He asks only for 40 
cents in stamps to cover postage. 

Requests for the books can be sent 
to Dr. William A. Russ, Jr., 603 Uni- 
versity Ave., Selmsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

Considered the definitive work on this 




subject, the two volumes are entitled 
The Hawaiian Revolution (1893-94) and 
The Hawaiian Republic (1894-89) and 
Its Struggle to Win Annexation. They 
were published in 1959 and 1961. 

A native of Ligonier, Pa., Dr. Russ 
earned his bachelor's degree at Ohio 
Wesleyan University, his master's degree 
at the University of Cincinnati, and 
the Ph.D. at the University of Chicago. 



and is pursuing graduate work at Temple 
University. Address: Apt. B-ll, 1100 
Tyson Ave., Roshu, Pa. 19001. 
SMITH-ADOMANIS 

Catherine P. Adomanis to Ted P. 
Smith '66, August 26, Sacred Heart 
Church, Bowie, Md. Ted is an associate 
programmer for IBM, working on con- 
tract to NASA at the Goddard Space 
Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The 
couple resides at Apt. 103, 13200 Miles 
Court, Laurel, Md. 20810. 

ASKEW-HASSINGER 

Clara Lynn Hassinger '57 to the Rev. 
Gilbert C. Askew '61, September 2, Zion 
Lutheran Church, Sunbury, Pa. Candace 
Fink Woernle '63 was one of the brides- 
maids. Walter Woernle Jr. '64 was best 
man; the Rev. Edward Huber '60 and 
the Rev. Richard Reichard '60 were 
ushers. Lynn earned the master's de- 
gree at Miami Lmiversity, Oxford, Ohio 
and is employed as an administrative 
assistant in the intern teaching program 
at Temple University. Gil resigned as 
assistant pastor of Zion Lutheran Church, 
Sunbury, and is working in the graduate 



program of Temple University toward 
an advanced degree in education. The 
program also includes work with the 
critical areas in the urban situation. 

The couple resides at 7841 Mill Rd., 
Elkins Park, Pa. 19117. 

FREIMANIS-DUKE 

Jnan Anne Duke '66 to Peter Armin 
Frcimanis '65, September 2, Clayton, 
N.J. Lynn Burgee Henss x'66 was an 
attendant. Joan is an elementary teach- 
er in Paulsboro and Pete is teaching 
German and coaching at Vineland High 
School. Address: 624 Lincoln Ave., 
Hone Court South, Pitman, N.J. 08071. 
REBUCK-WITMER 

Mary Jane Witmer '64 to Pierce E. 
Rebuck, September 3, Stone Valley 
United Church of Christ, Pillow, Pa. 
Mary Jane is teaching music in the 
Muncy ( Pa. ) School District. Her hus- 
band was graduated from Pierce Busi- 
ness School and is employed as a 
bookkeeper at Parkview Consumer Dis- 
count Co., Sunbury. The couple is liv- 
ing at 709 Susquehanna Ave., Sunbury 
17801. 



FALL 1967 



29 



FASOLD-LEISER 

Patricia E. Leiser to Donald W. Fas- 
old '68, September 9, First Lutheran 
Church, Watsontown, Pa. Mrs. Fasold is 
a nurse at the Geisinger Medical Center, 
Danville, Pa. Don is a senior at S.U., 
where he is majoring in chemistry. The 
couple resides at 337 Mill St., Danville 
17821. 

WENDLER-MITCHELL 

Joy Ann Mitchell to Paul Frederick 
Wendler III '64, September 9, St. Mary's 
Church, Winchester, Mass. Evert An- 
derson x'64 served as an usher. Mrs. 
Wendler is a nurse at Peter Bent Bring- 
ham Hospital, Boston. Paul is a grad- 
uate of Boston University School of Law 
and a first lieutenant with the Marine 
Con's Reserve. He will enter active 
duty in January. The couple lives at 38 
Winchester Avenue, Brookline, Mass. 
02146. 

HURST-ROZANSKI 

Barbara K. Rozanski '67 to David P. 
Hurst, September 16, Sacred Heart 
Roman Catholic Church, West Reading, 
Pa. Barbara is a sales correspondent 
for the Carpenter Steel Co., Reading, 
Pa., and her husband is employed by 
General Battery and Ceramic Corp., also 
in Reading, as a sales correspondent. 
Address: 908 Penn Ave., Wyomissing, 
Pa. 19610. 

NIXON-HELLER 

Diane Louise Heller '67 to David 
Wright Nixon, September 23, Grace 
Episcopal Church, Merchantville, N.J. 
Mary Elizabeth List '66 was one of the 
bridesmaids. Mr. Nixon is a graduate 
of Lafayette College. The couple re- 
sides at Stonewood Apts., 1004 Walnut 
St., Ridley Park, Pa. 19078. 
BUTTIMER-PHILE 

Susan Claire Phile '66 to Thomas 
Wesley Buttimer '67, September 30, St. 
Andrew's Methodist Church, Cherry 
Hill, N.J. Robert Duerr '66 and Franfc 
Marsh '67 were ushers. Tom is employ- 
ed by Delaware County as a teacher 
of retarded children at Elwin, Pa. He 
also is taking graduate work at Temple 
University. The couple lives at 526 S. 
Orange St., Media, Pa. 19063. 
WAGNER-MORGAN 

Mary Noel Morgan x'68 to Kurt W. 
Wagner, September 30, First Presbyter- 
ian Church, Cranbury, N.J. Mary was 
graduated from the Katharine G i b b s 
Secretarial School, New York City, and 
works for Myers-Fisher Co., Inc. Mr. 
Wagner is a student at New York Insti- 
tute ut Technology and works for the 
Interpublic Group of Companies, New 
York City. Address: 94-11 60th Ave., 
Apt. 6-A, Rcso Park, N.Y. 11373. 




SU vignette 



ROBERT A. PITTELLO '51 sometimes says he knows "every blade 
of grass" on University Field. Tins is only a slight exaggeration. Pittello 
completed his 15th season as an assistant football coach at S.U. this month. 
He has served under head coaches Amos Alonzo Stagg Jr., "Whitey" Keil, 
Jim Garrett, and now Jim Hazlett. 

Pittello also played three seasons of varsity ball when A. A. Stagg Jr. 
and Sr. were co-coaches at the university. He was a guard and a good one. 
"Bob was small, but he was as tough as nails," says alumni director "Buss" 
Carr, who played with him. 

While the S. U. players were being photographed on the first day 
of practice this season, Pittello asked sophomore guard Henry DePerro: 
"Who was the greatest guard who ever played at Susquehanna?" DePerro 
quickly replied: "You were, coach." 

"Smart boy. He wants to play, Pittello said. 

"Now that," quipped the photographer, "is what I call coaching." 

Pittello was a veteran of the Navy submarine service when he en- 
rolled at Susquehanna at the suggestion of Glenn Mengan, his former line 
coach at Mt. Carmel (Pa.) High School. Pittello still lives in Mt. Carmel, 
where he is the owner of a trucking agency. 

By taking summer courses, he completed his undergraduate work 
in three years. However, this prevented him from playing on the undefeat- 
ed team of 1951. "I still have a year of eligibility remaining," he declares. 

In his 18 years at the university as a player and coach, he has seen 
S.U. teams which were undefeated and others which were winless. Al- 
though the Crusaders have had their rjroblems this season, Pittello still 
believes student interest in football is greater than when he was an under- 
graduate. "I had a roommate in summer school who did not even know 
that I played," he added. 



30 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Born Crusaders 



To David and Irma Strawbridge Hal- 
lenhcck '49, their second daughter, Lisa 
Anne, June 9, 1966. Major HaUenbeck 
is attending the U.S. Army Command 
and General Staff College at Ft. Leaven- 
worth. 430-6 Kearney Ave., Ft. Leaven- 
worth, Kan. 66027. 

To Frederick D. '64 and Peggy Jane 
Walters Muller '62, a son, Karl Matthew, 
January 19. Fred is guidance counselor 
at Eastern York High School, Wrights- 
ville, Pa. R.D. 1, Summit Dr., Dallas- 
town, Pa. 17313. 

To Richard L. and Dianne Stauffer 
Gimbi '64, a son, Craig Richard, April 
2. 3 E. Main St., Weatherly, Pa. 18255. 

To Gerald W. and Beverly Hofecker 
Frederick .v'5.9, their second child, a 
daughter, Diane H., April 10. 609 Mead- 
ow Lane, Vienna, Va. 22180. 

To Thomas E. and Ann Edwards 
Sheehan x'61, their second daughter, 
Pamela Jane, April 24, P.O. Box 164, 
Winter Haven, Me. 04693. 

To Frank P. and Jane Beers Epinger 
'63, a son, Frank William, May 7. 801 
Benton St., Allentown, Pa. 18103. 

To Donald E. '60 and Mary Louise 
Neal Coleman '58, their second daugh- 
ter, Beth Ann, May 19. Don teaches 
American History in the Lewisburg 
Area School System. R.D. 1, Westlawn, 
Lewisburg, Pa. 17837. 

To John R. and Ruth Almond Roberts 
x'64, a daughter, Wendy Jean, June 25. 
Mr. Roberts teaches social studies and 
coaches football at Frank D. Roosevelt 
High School, Hyde Park, N.Y. Deer 
Hill Aprs., Route 9G, Hyde Park 12538. 

To William A. '64 and Anne Wilson 
Andel '61, their second son, John Adam, 
July 17. 503 Cramer Ave., Beverlv, N.J. 
08010. 

Sp/4 and Mrs. Ronald E. Oehlert '65, 
a son, Michael Ronald, July 20. Ron 
has been stationed at Fort Hood, Texas 
with Co. B, 1/46 Inf. 198 Inf. Bde. 
Box 279, Nolonville, Tex. 76559. 

To Curtis E. and Nancy Burns Shill- 
ing '65, a daughter, Kristin Suzanne, 
July 25. 314 Interstate Parkway, Brad- 
ford, Pa. 16701. 

To Dr. and Mrs. James L. Boeringer, 
a son, Daniel Wilharm, July 31. Dr. 
Boeringer is associate professor of 
music at Susquehanna and Mrs. Grace 
Nocera Boeringer is a lecturer in music. 
R.D. 1, Selinsgrove, Pa. 




Attractive Pamela Otstot of Carlisle, Pa. 
dons a freshman "dink." 339 fresh- 
men and 16 transfer students from 18 
states, the District of Columbia, and 
five foreign countries enrolled at S.U. 
this fall. 



To Donald C. and Eleanor Benncr Stuck 
'55, twin sons, Keith Allen and Kevin 
Allen, August 14. R.D. 1, Middleburg, 
Pa. 17842. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Glanzberg '48, 
a daughter, Susan Allison, August 17. 
Box 252, North Road, Oyster Bay Cove, 
N.Y. 11771. 

To Robert and Joan Raudenbush 
Wendel '57, their third son, Jerrold 
Keith, August 19. Beech St., Hatfield, 
Pa. 19440. 

To Norman A. '62 and Annette Cami>- 
bell Crickenberger 64, a son, Laurance 
Charles, August 19. 33 Fireplace Lane, 
Hicksville, N.Y. 11801. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Randolph P. Harri- 
son Jr., a daughter, Amanda Storm, 
August 23. Mr. Harrison is an instructor 
in biology at Susquehanna. R.D. 1, Sel- 
insgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Marlin A. Inch '61, 
a son, Jeffrey Allen, August 24. Marlin 
is co-owner of the Penn Valley Printing 
Co., Selinsgrove, and his wife, the for- 
mer Phoebe Griffith, is a part-time li- 
brarian at S.U. 8!« W. Mill St., Selins- 
grove, Pa. 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth O. Flad- 
niark, a daughter. Amy Marie, August 
26. Mr. Fladmark is associate professor 
of business administration at Susquehan- 
na University. 409 N. 9th St., Selins- 
grove, Pa. 17870. 



To Dr. and Mrs. Neil H. Potter, a 
son, Andrew Harrison, August 31. Dr. 
Potter is assistant professor of chemistry 
at S.U. 103 Susquehanna Ave., Selins- 
grove, Pa. 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Norman H. Lauer 
'62, their fourth child, a daughter, Me- 
lissa Beth, September 6. 620 N. 9th 
St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Schanke. 
a daughter, Julie Ann, September 17. 
Mr. Schanke is assistant professor of 
speech at S.U. 

To Mr. and Mrs. R. Douglas Kile '66, 
a daughter, Amy Louise, September 17. 
Doug is employed by IBM. 508 W. 
Main St., Endicott, N.Y. 13760. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Joe W. Kleinbauer 
'65, a daughter, Julie Lyn, September 
28. 532 N. 8th St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 
17870. 

To R. Stuart and Isabel Kiss Jones 
'49, a son, David Stuart, September 28. 
20 Valewood Dr., M.D. 33, Newburgh, 
N.Y. 12550. 



DEATHS 



Frederick C. Allen '31, Auburn, N.Y., 
June 21, 1966. Mr. Allen was a parole 
officer for the state of New York, work- 
ing at Attica, Syracuse, and then for 
17 years at Auburn. 

Freda Stephens Blochberger '33, 
Conklin, N.Y., July 7. Mrs. Blochberger 
had taught for the past 12 years in the 
Binghamton (N.Y.) Schools. 

Preston E. Parmer '25, Halifax, Pa.. 
August 2. Mr. Parmer operated his own 
farm supply business. 

Chalender H. Lesher 1)4, Huntingdon, 
Pa., August 4. Mr. Leslier was presi- 
dent of the Huntingdon County Thrift 
Companies and a former m a y o r of 
Huntingdon, publisher of the Hunting- 
don Monitor, president of the Juniata 
College Board of Trustees, Democratic 
national committeeman, and county 
chairman. 

Hugh L. Seelye x'43, Selinsgrove, Pa., 
August 8. Mr. Seelye was bursar of 
Susquehanna University from 1951 until 
1963. An alumnus of Mansfield State 
College, he attended Susquehanna as 
a graduate student in business adminis- 
tration. At the time of his death, he 
was executive director of the Lower 
Susquehanna Branch, Pennsylvania As- 
sociation for the Blind. 

G. Allen Botdorf '22, Harrisburg, Pa., 
August 14. 

The. Rev. John J. Weikel '22, Dal- 
matia, Pa., August 14. A Lutheran min- 



FALL 1967 



31 



ister f.r 42 years, he served congrega- 
tions in Esby, New Berlin and Stone 
Valley, Pa. In addition to his widow, 
he leaves three sons, Dexter '48, Deri, 
and Gail '58. 

Edna Kline Balcomb x'07, Liverpool, 
Pa., August 30. Mrs. Balcomb, a grad- 
uate of the University of Chicago, was 
a former principal of Waycross (Ga.) 
and Liverpool High Schools. She re- 
tired in 1948. 

Ralph W. Woodruff '30, Selinsgrove, 
Pa., September 4. Mr. Woodruff, a 
member of Susquehanna's Board of Di- 
rectors, received the M.A. degree from 
the university in 1921 and also held 
L.L.B. degrees from George Washing- 
ton University and the Stetson Univer- 
sity Law School, Deland, Fla. For some 
years he was head of the history de- 
partment at Sunbury High School. He 
also taught at Selinsgrove High and at 



Susquehanna during several s u m m e r 
sessions. Mr. Woodruff was chief of 
registrations and renewals, Bureau of 
Professional Licensing, Pennsylvania De- 
partment of Public Instruction, from 
1938 until 1957. He was a member of 
one of the two U.S. Army Ambulance 
Corps units from Susquehanna which 
saw service in Europe during World 
War I and a recipient of the Italian 
War Cross for meritous service. Active 
in numerous veterans organizations, he 
was a past president of American Legion 
Victory Post 25 at Selinsgrove. In ad- 
dition, he was chairman of the North- 
eastern Sanitary Authority of Snyder 
County and the representative for Re- 
gion 6 on the state Air Pollution Control 
Board. A son of the late Dr. John I. 
Woodruff, former professor of Latin and 
history and acting president of Susque- 
hanna University, Mr. Woodruff is sur- 



vived by his widow, the former Loretta 
Edwards; a sister, Mary Woodruff Mar- 
tin '19; and a niece and nephew. 

George O. Stahl, Sunbury, Pa., Sep- 
tember 17. "Kid" Stahl was a Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad telegrapher by occupation 
and a football, baseball, basketball, and 
track and field coach by avocation. He 
coached football at Susquehanna in 1920 
and 1921, w h e n the university was 
meeting such teams as Colgate, Buck- 
nell, Lehigh, and Army. He also pro- 
duced a number of outstanding teams 
at Sunbury High School and stressed 
the building cf character as well as 
physical fitness. 

The. Rev. Dr. M. Herbert Messner '20, 
Cleveland, Ohio, September 29. He was 
pastor of Redeemer Lutheran Church, 
Pittsburgh, for some 40 years and wrote 
numerous article and poems which were 
published in Pittsburgh newspapers. 



su 



SPORTS 



(Continued from page 15) 

one victory in their last three games to clinch a win- 
ning record. Susquehanna has been playing inter- 
collegiate soccer since 1959. The university's best pre- 
vious record was 5-5-1 in 1963. 

Dr. Neil Potter, coach, gave much of the credit 
to a stout defense led by fullbacks John Arnold, a 
senior from Stamford, Conn.; Dennis Baker, senior 
from McClure, Pa.; and Jay Bolton, sophomore from 
Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J. The Crusaders had shut out four 
of their opponents and held two others to one goal. 

Rich Pfeifer, senior inside from Peekskill, N.Y., 
was the leading S.U. scorer with eight goals. Pfeifer 
had not scored any goals before this season. 

Another factor in the team's success was the ad- 
dition of some excellent freshmen such as halfbacks 
Larry Collingwood of West Caldwell, N.J., and Mark- 
Stevens of Haverford, Pa.; forward Carter Kaneen of 
Larchmont, N.Y., and wingman Don Auld of Pudge- 
wood, N.J. 

o a a 

With Boli Hadfield and Bob Volkmar again finish- 
ing first and second in almost every meet, the cross 
country team enjoyed another winning season — its 
third in the past four years. 



Hadfield, a senior from East Greenwich, R.I., and 
Volkmar, sophomore from Erie, Pa., also provided a 
strong one-two pimch in 1966, but a lack of squad 
depth had held the Crusaders to a 5-8 record. 

The needed depth was supplied this fall by fresh- 
men Jeff Roush, Hillsdale, N.J.; Dave Rosborough, 
Saxonburg, Pa.; and Doug Peters, Ironia, N.J. With 
one meet remaining, the S.U. runners had won 9 and 
lost 3. 

* a 9 

A strong schedule and numerous injuries, par- 
ticularly in the backfield, were two of reasons for the 
football team's dismal record. At one point, the Cru- 
saders' first four halfbacks, two fullbacks, and a start- 
ing end were sidelined by injuries or illness. At the 
same time, Wayne Liddick, senior quarterback from 
Montoursville, Pa., was being used as a flanker be- 
cause a shoulder injury made it difficult for him to 
pass. 

Liddick returned to quarterback in the Frederick 
game and threw three touchdown passes to lead S.U. 
to a 27-7 victory, but when the Crusaders lost to 
Juniata the following week their record was 1-6 with 
two games to play. 



32 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



SUSOUE 

Carr's Column 




Freshman Parties . . . 

Members of the Alumni Association again help- 
ed us tremendously by entertaining freshmen in July 
and August. There were 11 parties this year and the 
attendance was proof that new students want to learn 
as much as possible before they arrive on campus. 
Upperclassmen are invited to these parties, too, and 
they do a great job of orienting the frosh on what to 
expect at Susquehanna. 

I might add that we also get an opportunity at 
the parties to make these young people aware of the 
Alumni Association and some of its activities. My 
sincere gratitude to all of this year's hosts and hostesses 
—Ed and Blanche Forney Rogers, both '42; Harry and 
Virginia Doss Butts, both '48; the Rev. Ralph '36 and 
Mrs. Shockey; Louise Mehring Koontz '35 and Mr. 
Koontz; Bill '53 and Peggy Henderson Davenport '60; 
Henry and Betty Johnston Keil, both '39; George '54 
and Lorraine Rarick Liddington '52; Dr. and Mrs. 
Larry Fisher '31; Clyde and Helen YVentzel Spitzner, 
both '37; Bob '53 and Margaret Brady Wyllie '56; and 
Hannah Pirner Lambert '28 and Mr. Lambert. 

Homecoming . . . 

Homecoming 1967 was a day of celebrating and 
reminiscing. There was some rain, but it did not dark- 
en the spirits of those who returned. This year will 
be especially remembered by those men elected to 
the Sports Hall of Fame. The banquet Saturday eve- 
ning (which was sold out) has to be considered one 
of the finest events honoring alumni to be held at S.U. 
for many years. Eighteen of the 28 men named to 
the Hall of Fame returned for the banquet and three 
of the six deceased members were represented by a 
member of their family. The pride and happiness 
these former athletes felt was expressed in their faces 
as they received their awards from Dr. Weber. "Rip" 
Engle's speech was at times amusing and at other 
times highly inspiring. For those who have followed 
S.U. football for many years, the joy of reliving many 
memories was particularly gratifying. Congratulations 
to this select group of men. They have given us all 
something to cheer about down through the years. 



Archives . . . 

J a n e Schnure '39, who is responsible for die 
Archives in the S.U. Library, has on several occasions 
expressed her gratitude for the help she has received 
from alumni. Material sent to her includes old play- 
bills, football and glee club programs, photographs, 
and all sorts of memorabilia. During the past two years, 
she has received a number of things from the widow 
of William Van Horn '36, Mary Schnure Thompson '06, 
Lois Brungart Bendigo '31, Margaret Buyers '28, Dr. 
George P. Manhart 10, and Parke Huntington '17. If 
you find any old S.U. material the next time you clean 
your attic, don't burn it! Send it to the Alumni Office. 
Particularly hard to locate are back issues of the stu- 
dent newspaper, formerly The Susquehanna, and now 
The Crusader. Copies needed are 1943 Volume 52, 
Nos. 1 through 4; 1945 Volume 54, No. 14; 1948 Vol- 
ume 57. No. 4; 1949 Volume 58, No. 2; Volume 59, 
No. 1; 1958 Volume 63, No. 18. 

Visitors . . . 

Many alumni visit us from time to time and want 
to see all the changes. The new Chapel-Auditorium 
seems to be the main attraction, but the growth tak- 
ing place on our campus is the most amazing thing 
to the majority of visitors. Two people that many 
alumni inquire about stopped by not long ago — Mrs. 
Anna Humphrey and Dr. Viola Du Frain. Dr. Du 
Frain, a business teacher at the university from 1936 
to 1942, retired from teaching at Southern Illinois 
University in 1964 and is living at Crestsiew Club 
apartments, Sylvania, Ohio. Mrs. Humphrey, former 
dietician at S.U., lives at the Allegheny Lutheran 
Home, Hollidaysburg, Pa. 

Happy Holidays . . . 

The holiday season is fast approaching and, 
believe it or not, the spring alumni meeting will soon 
be here. This has been a happy year for all of us at 
S.U. The continuing interest, concern and efforts of our 
alumni certainly helped to make it so. Our thanks to 
all of y-ou. May this be your Merriest Christmas and 
Happiest New Year. 



FALL 1967 



33 



The Susquehanna University Chairs 



For that special place in your home 
or office . . . ideal as a gift. 
Crafted of selected Northern 
hard woods . . . painted black with 
gold trim and the University seal 
in gold . . . cherry arms 
available on the General's chair. 



GENERAL'S CHAIR $35 
BOSTON ROCKER $29 

SIDE CHAIR $21 



(Order now! New prices after 
Jan. 1 : General's chair $37, 
Boston Rocker $30, Side Chair 
$22) 




BOSTON ROCKER 



Make checks payable to 
Susquehanna University 
Bookstore. Pennsylvania 
residents add 5% for State 
sales tax. Mail order to 
Alumni Office. Allow three 
or four weeks for delivery. 



ORDER BLANK 



To: ALUMNI OFFICE 

Susquehanna University 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 

Enclosed please find $ 



Please send: 



General's chair (s) @ $35 each 

□ black arms □ cherry arms 

Boston rocker (s) @ $29 each 



Side chair's @ $21 each 

I will pay freight charges on delivery from Gardner, Mass. 

Ship to 

Address 

City State Zip 



34 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICERS 

(Continued from inside front cover) 
JOHNSTOWN 
Frank K. Fetterolf '48, 91 Colgate Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 
William H. Kahl '62, 139 Venango St., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 
Mary Lizzio Govekar '47 (Mrs. Max A.), 40 Main St., Conemaugh, Pa. 
Thomas J. Weible '23, 324 Orchard St., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 
Man* Barnes Topper '37 (Mrs. John A.), Hyndman, Pa. 15545 
Ham- P. Shaffer '29. 514 Yickroy Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 



V resident 

Vice President 

15909 Secretary 

Treasurer 

Director 2 years 

Director 3 years 



LEHIGH VALLEY 

Dr. Xevin C. T. Shaffer '49, 1632 Walnut St., Allentown, Pa. 18102 President 

Margaret Hartz Ide Maguire '33 (Mrs. James C. ), Lanark Star Route, Allentown, Pa. 18100 

Vice President 
Corinne Kalin Kramer '45 (Mrs. Harold R.), 1154 E. Cedar St., Allentown, Pa. 18103 

Secretartj-Treasurer 

LEWISTOWN 

The Rev. Robert G. Sander '40, 406 W. Fourth St., Lewistown. Pa. 17044 President 

Edward R. Rhodes '57, Box 191, Lewistown, Pa. 17044 Vice President 

Phyllis Swartz Derr '49 (Mrs. Aloysius V.), Seneca Rd., Shawnee Hills. Belleville, Pa. 17044 

Secretary-Treasurer 
MOUNT CARMEL-SHAMOKIN 
Timothy Barnes '35, 251 Park St., Mt. Carmel, Pa. 17851 
Dr. James C. Gehris '50, 633 W. Chestnut St., Shamokin, Pa. 17872 
S. John Price '42. 1435 Arch St., Ashland. Pa. 17921 

NEW YORK METROPOLITAN 

The Rev. Dr. John G. Gensel '40, 215 W. 98th St., Apt. 11-B 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary-Treasurt r 



New York, N.Y. 10025 

Vice President 
10022 Secretary-Treasurer 
Executive Committee 



President 
Vice PresidetU 



Richard G. Westervelt '50, 412 E. 55th St., New York. N.Y. 
Jack Thorp '50. Thorp Lane, Norwalk, Conn. 06850 

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA 

Roland R. Rosetti '51, Box 23, South Canaan, Pa. 18459 
Xavier Abbott '35, 215 Oliver St., Swoyen-ille, Pa. 18704 
Alice Greeger Pfeffer '51 (Mrs. William M.I, Trailwood R.D. #1, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18702 

Secretary- Treasu rer 
NORTH NEW JERSEY 
Gerald '58 and Cathrine Henry Herbster '59, 1084 Nicholas Ave., Union, N.J. 07083 

President 
George '54 and Lorraine Rarick Liddington '52, 78 Center Ave., Chatham, N.J. 07928 

Vice President 
Robert C. '53 and Margaret Brady Wyllie x'56, 8 Thome Place, Fanwood N.J. 07023 

Secretary 
John H. '62 and Nancy Davis Raab '61. 33 Oakland Ave., Apt. 31, Bloomfield, N.J. 07003 

Treasurer 
PHILADELPHIA 
Paul Wagner '50, 25 Old Lancaster Rd., Apt. A-7, Bala Cynwyd, Pa. 19004 President 

Donald F. Wohlsen '50, Kenilworth Lane, Ambler, Pa. 19002 1st Vice President 

Ham- W. Butts '48, 335 Chester Rd., Devon, Pa. 19333 2nd Vice President 

Marvel Cowling Robinson '53 (Mrs. Franklin). 309 Woodridge Lane, Media, Pa. 19063 

Recording Secretary 
Shirley A. Young '51, 6136 Wayne Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 Corresponding Secretary 
Robert E. Ricedorf '50, 705 S. Perm St., West Chester, Pa. 19380 
Harold E. Shaffer '40, 319 E. Marshall St., West Chester, Pa. 19380 
Louise E. West '39, 111 S. Church St., West Chester, Pa. 19380 
Edward S. Rogers '42, 1629 S. Crescent Blvd., Yardley, Pa. 19067 

PITTSBURGH 

Peter Shuty '38, 5518 Jane St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15225 
Pauline Crow Mount '34 (Mrs. B. H.), 100 Beech St 

READING 
W. Frank Laudenslayer '39, R.D. #3, Boyertown, Pa. 
Dr. Ralph H. Tietbohl Jr. '49, 3031 Van Reed Rd., Sinking Spring, Pa. 19608 

Vice President 
William S. Whiteley '35, 1910 N. 15th St., Reading, Pa. 19604 Secretary 

Richard Calm '58, 412 Church Rd., Wernersville. Pa. 19565 Treasurer 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 15218 



19512 



Treasurer 
Director 
Director 
Director 

President 
Secretary 

President 



FALL 1967 



35 



SOUTH JERSEY 

David J. Schumacher '64, 3103 Sheffield Dr., Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077 President 

Kenneth F. Erdley Jr. '55, 219 Lakeside Dr., Glassboro, N.J. 08028 Vice President 

Peter M. Nunn '57, 32 Mercator Lane. Willingboro, N.J. 08046 Vice President 

Barbara Claffee Schumacher '63 (Mrs. David J.), 3103 Sheffield Dr., Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077 

Secretary 
Leslie R. Butler '62, 51 S. Summit Ave., Pitman, N.J. 08071 Treasurer 

Shirley Bell Eastman '55 (Mrs. Edwin R.), 14 Constance Dr., Trenton, N.J. 08620 

Executive Committee 
Cathleen W. Mackey '6.5, 423 Bradshaw Ave., Haddonfield, N.J. 08033 

Executive Committee 
The Rev. Ralph I. Shockey, S.T.M. '36, 265 E. Main St., Moorestown, N.J. 08057 

Executive Committee 
SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY 
Dr. Nelson E. Bailey '57, R.R. #1, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 President 

Roger A. Holtzapple '59, 228 N. 11th St., Lewisburg, Pa. 17837 Vice President 

Frances Laudenslager Hatton '31, 624 N. 4th St., Sunbury, Pa. 17801 Secretary 

Henry R. Albright '54, 1146 E. Chestnut St., Sunbury, Pa. 17801 Treasurer 

WASHINGTON 

Robert W. Curtis '63, 232 Normandy Hill Dr., Alexandria, Va. 22304 
John A. Schoffstall Sr. '33, 2104 Grayson PI., Falls Church, Va. 22043 
Freida Dreese Dunkle '29 (Mrs. Lloyd L. Jr.), 4538 N. 39th St., Arlington, Va. 22207 

2nd Vice President 
Margaret Webb Coons '61 (Mrs. Louis R.), 10300 Darby St., Fairfax, Va. 22030 

Secretary-Treasurer 
WILLIAMSPORT 
Winifred Myers O'Dell '49 (Mrs. George), 190 N. Railroad St., Hughesville, Pa. 17737 

President 
The Rev. Lloyd T. Wilson '50, R.D. #1, Watsontown, Pa. 17777 
Jill A. Fuller '58, 503 Allegheny St., Jersey Shore, Pa. 17740 



President 
1st Vice President 



Vice President 
Secretary- Treasu rer 



YORK-HANOVER 

John H. Hendricks '57, R.D. #1, Sunset Lane, York, Pa. 17404 

Richard S. Karschner '65, Edgeboro Dr., Manchester, Pa. 17345 

Dorothy Nitchman Bowen '49 (Mrs. Lyle H.), 720 Gunnison Rd., York, Pa. 

E. Jane Stitt '44, 2000 Worth St., York, Pa. 17404 

Raymond W. Stiller '59, 1530 Fifth Ave., York, Pa. 17403 

The Rev. Charles A. Snyder '53, Mt. Zion Rd., R.D. #7, York, Pa. 17402 

Patricia P. Heathcote '52, 2421 Cambridge Rd., York, Pa. 17402 

Flora Ellmore Shilling x'53 (Mrs. Russell T. ), 320 Pennsylvania Ave., York Pa 



President 
Vice President 
17404 

Secretary 
Treasurer 
Committee 
Committee 
Committee 
17404 
Committee 



THE SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 

Susquehanna University 

Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 

17870 




POSTMASTER: Please notify if undelivered. 

Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



WINTER 1968 



3U 



mQUEHRMR 




ALUMNUS 





Alumni are invited to attend any or all of the events of the university's third 
annual Creative Arts Festival from Saturday through Monday, May 11 - 13. 
Organized by associate professor of music Dr. James Boeringer (directing a 
combination brass and vocal choir in the photograph above), the festival will 
begin with a concert of "folk - rock" religious music at 8 p.m. Saturday, May 
11. Other festival activities will include: ■ A worship service in modern 
liturgy at 11 a.m. Sunday. B Music by Pennsylvania composers and Susque- 
hanna students at 2 p.m. Sunday. B Music by three S.U. faculty members 
at 4 p.m. Sunday. ■ A concert of contemporary American music by the Sigma 
Alpha Iota Chorus at 8 p.m. Sunday. ■ A dance convocation choreographed 
by Joan Mover of Sunbury at 10 a.m. Monday. ■ An organ recital by Susan 
Stephan '69 at 8 p.m. Monday. All of these events will be in the Chapel-Aud- 
itorium. In addition, there will be campus art exhibits by Hilda Karniol. in- 
structor in art, and bv a number of students. 



Susquehanna University Alumni Association 

President 

Albert P. Molinaro Jr. *50 

Vit • Presid* nts 

Marlyn R. Fetterolf '23 
Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42 

Recording Secretary 
Dorothy Turner '36 

Treasurer 

Chester G. Rowe '52 

Historian 

Dr. John J. Houtz 'OS 

Executive Board M e ruber s~at -Large 

Term expires 1968: Mabel Kin/ey Fetterolf 
'24, Dr. John F. Hanna "35, Harold E. Shaf- 
fer '40, Donald C. Berninger '52. H. Nathan 
Ward '63. Term expires 1969: Dr. Lau- 
rence C. Fisher '3 1 , John Yonkondy '36, 
Harry \V. Butts Jr. '48, Dr. Nelson E. Bailey 
'57, Lynn E. Lerew '63. Term expires 
1970: Timothy E. Bames '35, Dorothy Eil- 
hardt Gundrum '48, The Rev. Dale S. Bring- 
man '48, Dr. James C. Gehris *50, Nancy 
Davis Raab '61. 

Representatives on the University Board of 
Directors 
Louise Mehring Koontz '35 
Lawrence M. Isaacs '43 

Representatives on the Athletic Commiff> e 
Simon B. Rhoads '30 
Jack P. Shipe *40 




The susmmmA alumnus 



ON OUR COVER 

Ten-year-old Heilman Hall is the home 
of Susquehanna University's Division of 
Music. 



Ronald E. Berkhelmer 

Acting Editor 

Charles H. "Buss" Cahr '52 
Director of Alumni Relations 



Vol. 37 



WINTER 1968 



No. 2 



CONTENTS 

Education in the Hinterlands 

by Ron Berkheimer and Charles Price 



Planning for College S 

by Charles Price 

Alumni Weekend 10 

Harrisburg Workshop 11 

1967 Alumni Loyalty Fund . . . Second Report . . 12 

The Plain Fact Is 15 

The Special Report 

A Diversity of Interests 31 

SU Sports 32 

by Ron Berkheimer 

The 67ens . . . Where Are They Now? .... 33 

Spring Sports Schedules 35-36 

Susquehannans on Parade 37 

SU Vignette 38 

"I Do" 40 

Bom Crusaders 42 

Deaths 42 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Publish- 
ed four times a year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



WINTER 1968 



Susquehanna attracts a considerable proportion 
of its students from metropolitan areas. With 
the traditional disdain of the urbanite for all 
things rural, a number of these students are 
inclined to regard Selinsgrove (population 4,000) as 
remote, provincial, and a little backward. 

More than a few Susquehanna students, includ- 
ing upperclassmen, have never heard of Freeburg, 
only five miles southwest of the campus. Presumably, 
some of them would consider Freeburg, which has 
less than 600 inhabitants, even more remote, provin- 
cial, and backward. 

Such views — to whatever extent they are held 
— are an injustice to the two communities. Despite 
their size, both towns have always had leaders with 
a keen interest in education and culture. 

When Benjamin Kurtz and his followers decided 
in the 1850s to build a Lutheran seminary in Pennsyl- 
vania, Selinsgrove successfully competed against three 
other towns which sought to become the site of the 
new school. Founded in 1858, "Missionary Institute 
of the Evangelical Lutheran Church" gradually 



branched into other fields of study and changed its 
corporate name to Susquehanna University in 1895. 

(Selinsgrove also had fried to obtain the state 
normal school which eventually was located at Blooms- 
burg and became Bloomsburg State College.) 

Freeburg, during the latter part of the 19th cen- 
tury, was the home of not one, but two, institutions 
of higher education — The Freeburg Academy and 
The Freeburg Musical College. 

In addition, the tiny community also had a Phil- 
harmonic Society for a number of year's. Formed in 
1876, the society sponsored concerts and music fes- 
tivals and for a time offered instruction in competition 
with the Musical College. Membership was by sub- 
scription and with the funds thus obtained the society 
brought in musicians from outside the community for 
recitals. Apparently, the society was disbanded after 
the town hall, the headquarters for its activities, burn- 
ed in 1892. 

The Academy and the Musical College had longer 
lives. Organized in 1853, the Academy remained in 
operation until 1895. The Musical College was found- 



Education 

in the 

Hinterlands 



by RON BERKHEIMER AND CHARLES PRICE 




Frederick C. Moyer, founder of the Musical College. 

SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



ed in 1871 and was headed by Frederick C. Moyer 
until his death in 1891. Members of the Moyer family 
kept it going until 1911. 

Last fall Susquehanna was given a collection of 
memorabilia of the Academy and the Musical College 
by Mrs. Ella Shoch, granddaughter of Frederick C. 
Moyer. The materials included old photographs, news- 
paper clippings, and printed programs of commence- 
ments and recitals. 

Among the materials dealing with the Academy 
are an autograph book owned by Mrs. Shoch's mother, 
a newspaper account of commencement exercises, and 
a handbill in almost perfect condition advertising the 
Academy. 

Mrs. Shoch s mother, Caroline B. Moyer, attended 
the Academy from 1857 until 1861. Her autograph 
book reveals some of the ideals of the Academy stu- 
dents. The anonymous writer of the dedication page 
remarks that the concern of the book was "not sweet 
strains of poesy, displaying the beauties of rhetoric 
and classical lore, but the sentiments of the heart, dis- 
playing the beauties of true friendship." 



Despite diis avowed intention of avoiding rhe- 
toric, the same writer goes on to describe friendship 
as "the fairest and best gift of high heaven; as the 
tie that connects heart to heart, and mind to mind, as 
the source of bliss and the foundation of true happi- 
ness, fairer far than the pearls of the ocean, the gems 
of the earth, or the vain and delusive brightness of 
silver and gold." 

Numerous entries speak of a concern for Chris- 
tian virtue and for the hope of reunion in heaven. 
One student declares: "It is only in the company of 
the good that real enjoyment is to be found." An- 
other describes wit as "exciting," but then dismisses 
it as "only the brilliant exhibition of self - confident 
power. Its satisfaction ends with the scene." In 
contrast, there is praise for "the confiding intercourse 
of sincere minds and friendly hearts, knowing and 
loving and esteeming one another." 

The Academy was organized by stockholders on 
Jan. 14, 1853, and classes began on Oct. 10 of that year. 
The first building was dedicated on Dec. 26. It was 
destroyed by fire in 1855, but plans were made im- 




The Freeburg Musical College: ". . . completely dedicated to music education." 



WINTER 1968 



mediately for another structure and the second build- 
ing was dedicated the clay after Easter — April 13, 
1856. The school was legally incorporated in 1858 
as the "Freeburg Academy of the Lutheran and Re- 
formed Denominations" for the purpose of promoting 
studies of higher education. 

That the Academy was a pioneering venture is 
substantiated by the fact that the first public school 
in Snyder County had opened only about 10 years 
earlier. The Rev. E. G. Erlenmyer and Calvin Mover 
were two of the chief organizers. Mover is reported 
to have said that it is better to be "unborn than 
untaught." 

In 1867 - 68, there were 86 students in the Acad- 
emy's "academic" course and 49 in the "primary" di- 
vision. Three years later the "academic" enrollment 
had grown to 196 and the "primary" to 66. The ma- 
jority of the students were from Snyder County, with 



"free from temptations 
to vice and immorality" 



about a third coming from eight surrounding counties. 
There also was one student from Ohio. 

The chief concern of the "academic" division was 
to prepare students for college, while the "primary" 
division seems to have been similar to the general 
course of a modern high school. 

In addition, tiiere was a "normal school" program 
to prepare students for teaching in the public schools. 
Conducted in co-operation with the Snyder County 
superintendent of schools, the "normal school" train- 
ing was continued for almost 15 years after the Acad- 
emy had formally closed. 

The "academic" program included instruction in 
Latin, Greek and modern languages, g r a m m a r , 
rhetoric, history, geography, government and science. 
One of the textbooks was entitled: "Philosophy, Chem- 
istry, and Astronomy." 

In a day when education was limited largely to the 
classics, the Freeburg Academy also offered business 
and vocational courses. Double-entry bookkeeping and 
training for the writing of bills, invoices, and con- 
tracts were available to the students interested in busi- 
ness. A course in practical surveying was taught by 
Alvin Wonder, principal of the Academy from 1885 
to 1890 and an experienced road constructor. Al- 
though some modern academicians are inclined to look 
down their noses at vocational education, the fact that 



the Academy had such a curriculum indicates that 
its faculty and administrators were ahead or well 
abreast of the educational trends and thinking of 
their own day. The Morrill Act of 1862 establishing 
the land - grant colleges is generally thought to have 
given the first real impetus to vocational education. 

Moreover, in keeping with the musical interest of 
Freeburg, the Academy always offered musical in- 
struction, both instrumental and vocal. 

A handbill advertising the Academy reveals that 
the academic year was divided into two terms of 22 
weeks each, with the "winter term beginning the first 
Tuesday of January" and the "summer term beginning 
the last Tuesday of July." In comparison with today's 
inflated prices, education was cheap — the total cost 
of tuition, board, room and music lessons amounting 
to $75.25 per term. Academy officials advertised their 
institution as "located in the pleasant village of Free- 
burg in one of the most beautiful, healthy and well 
cultivated valleys of the state. The inhabitants are 
industrious, moral, and hospitable, and the students 
being free from temptations to vice and immorality, 
are surrounded by many of the comforts of home." 

The Academy had a group of interested alumni. 
A lengthy newspaper account of the commencement 
exercises (probably in 1892) includes a report of an 
alumni meeting. A number of alumni spoke about 
their activities and A. Frank Seltzer of Lebanon gave 
"an interesting account of his recent trip to the Pacific 
Coast and New Mexico." Later in die program. Seltzer 
also presented a "thirty minute talk on 'Popular Su- 
perstitions' which was listened to with close attention 
and humorous points were highly relished by the 
audience." 

For more than three decades, the Freeburg Acad- 
emy filled the educational needs of its own geographic 
area and had some influence outside that area. With 
the expansion of the public school system to the sec- 
ondary level, it was unable to meet die competition of 
"free public high schools" and came to its end in 1895. 

The Freeburg Musical College was largely die 
work of one man, its founder, Frederick Christian 
Moyer. In addition to being a respected musician, 
Mover also had an avid interest in fanning. He pro- 
moted the use of fertilizers and devised methods of 
draining swampland and straightening the courses 
of creeks. 

Moyer made very little money with the Musical 
College. His interest in it was apparently cultural. 
All nine of his children were musically inclined and 
six of them went on tour as a vocal group. 

The greater part of the materials given to Sus- 
quehanna by Mrs. Shoch deal with the Musical Col- 
lege. There are photographs of Mover and of his six 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Musical College Tour Group, 1785. Seated: Lydia Brown, Jane 
Hilbish, Will Houtz. Standing: William Moyer, Philip B. Moyer, 
Daniel Moyer, Sarah Shaffer. All but Houtz were sons or daugh- 
ters of Frederick C. Moyer. 



sons and daughters in the "Tour Group," a catalogue 
from the "twenty-fifth year" of the college, several 
commencement programs, an advertising handbill, and 
a musical textbook. 

The catalogue shows that the college was com- 
pletely dedicated to musical education. It offered 
four six - week terms, a winter term of four weeks, 
and a mid-winter term of 12 weeks. Classes began at 
8 a.m. Enough pianos and organs were available so 
that each student could have three to six hours of 
practice daily "according to the physical condition of 
the student." 

There were strict rules for female students. "Lady 
students are not allowed to walk or drive with gentle- 
men during the day or evening— nor to attend picnics, 
parties, and visit in private families without the con- 
sent of the director." 

The advertising handbill, dated April 30, 1890, 
states that "since its organization over 5,000 students 
have attended" the Musical College. The average 
cost for a six-week term, including private lessons, 
came to $33. This also included room and board 
which were listed at $2.50 a week. 

Frederick Mover's son, Henry B. Moyer, and his 
granddaughter, Anna Moyer, (Mrs. Shoch's sister) 



continued to operate the school from the founder's 
death in 1891 until 1911. During several of its latter 
years, instruction was given only during the summer 
months. The Musical College building burned in 
1908 and the school's instruments were sold, but Anna 
Moyer continued teaching classes for three more years 
in her large three-story home. 

Writing about the Academy in his The Story of 
Snyder County, Dr. George F. Dunkelberger remarks: 
"The greatness of an institution doesn't necessarily 
depend on the number of students enrolled nor on 
the size of its teaching staff. Its greatness is more 
frequently measured by its accomplishments, and by 
the spirit in which it did its work." 

These remarks can be applied to the Musical Col- 
lege as well. Both of these institutions revealed a 
"spirit" — a concern for music, culture, and refinement. 

Freeburg as a community was known for its music. 
Dunkelberger wrote: "It was frequently stated that 
it was impossible for anyone to pass through the town 
without hearing the sweet strains of vocal and instru- 
mental music." While the saying that Freeburgers 
even wept and quarreled in harmony was undoubtedly 
legend, if there ever was a place where "music swells 
the breeze and rings from all the trees," that place was 
Freeburg in the last third of the 19th century. 

But the founders and administrators of the Acad- 
emy and the Musical College were not concerned 
simply with culture for its own sake. They were mo- 
tivated by deeply felt Christian convictions. All were 
staunch churchmen — lay leaders in the Lutheran and 
Reformed congregations of St. Peter's Church, Free- 
burg. They viewed the training of the heart and the 
mind as a holy stewardship. 

We are inclined today to laugh at the naive sen- 
timents expressed in Caroline Mover's autograph book 
or at the assertions by officials of the Academy and 
the Musical College that in Freeburg students would 
be less likely to fall victim to the temptations of vice 
and corruption. These, however, were not laughing 
matters at the time. 

Before we dismiss this as Victorian prudery, per- 
haps we should remember the comments of Bucknell 
University President Charles H. Watts II when he 
spoke at Susquehanna's Opening Convocation and Fall 
Commencement on Sept. 16, 1966. Dr. Watts praised 
"the practical and idealistic, tough and sensitive men 
and women who established colleges like Susquehanna 
(and) believed that man is indeed more than die sum 
of his environmental, genetic and historic past." 

The institutions they founded— even though some 
of those institutions now survive only as memories — 
are a wonderful legacy. 



WINTER 1968 




Dr. Tam Poison heads Susquehanna University's College Guidance Clinic. 



Planning for College 



by CHARLES PRICE 



Should I go to college? Can I get into college? 
What kind of college? These are the questions which 
worry high school students as they face the pressures 
of family aspirations and the increased training need- 
ed to qualify for good jobs in a complex society, to 
say nothing of their own ambitions. 

Through its College Guidance Clinic, Susque- 
hanna University is trying to help students find intell- 
igent answers to these important questions. Beginning 
with just IS students in 1963, the clinic had grown to 
63 last summer. Applications are now being accepted 
(until April 15) for the clinic to be held in June. 

In spite of the small number of students involved, 
the 1 clinic has received considerable acclaim from die 
students themselves, their parents, and from high 
school guidance counselors — the group whose advice 
has such a strategic role in the student's choice of a 
college. 



The idea behind the College Guidance Clinic is 
not new. Faced with the aggravating drop-out prob- 
lem, many colleges and universities have sought to 
provide some type of guidance to prospective students 
in terms of tests and professional interpretation of the 
results. 

Susquehanna's clinic, however, is unique in sev- 
eral ways. It is designed to give high school students 
the experience of actually attending college classes 
and participating in campus life. The clinic enrollees 
spend five days on the campus while the summer ses- 
sion is in progress. They live in the university dorm- 
itories, attend classes, hear lectures, and eat in the 
college dining room. They also are housed with stu- 
dents taking summer courses. For all intents and 
purposes, they are college 1 students for a week, shar- 
ing the academic disciplines, the social life, and the 
informal conversation of dormitory life. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Dr. Tarn Poison, dean of students and chief arch- 
itect of the clinic, believes that all this is very import- 
ant. He feels that the student needs the experience 
of being away from home, out of his normal routine, 
and of being on his own in a college atmosphere. 
As he attends classes, hears lectures, takes notes, and 
studies them with other class members, he can gain 
practical insight into his own listening and learning 
skills. He can even have a "dry-run" admissions inter- 
view if he wants it. All this takes away the fear of 
the unknown, and gives the student a sense of confi- 
dence. As one clinic participant put it: 

"I feel that I have a better idea of what 

college life is really like, and I'm not as scared 

about college as I was before." 
In addition, Dr. Poison arranges lectures dealing with 
the offerings of various types of colleges and the things 
to look for while visiting the kind of college a student 
would find most useful. 

But the College Guidance Clinic does far more 
than simply giving prospective students a five - clay 
campus experience. Basic to the whole clinic pro- 
gram is the role of the professional counselor. Enough 
high school counselors are recruited so that none is 
responsible for more than three students. This gives 
each counselor time to work extensively with each 
of the students assigned to him. 

To aid in the counseling task, each participant 
takes the following series of psychological and aptitude 
tests before arriving on campus: 

Kruder Preference Record, Vocational 

Kruder Preference Record, Personal 

Edwards Personal Preference Schedule 

Educational Interest Inventory 

Vocational Interest Blank 

Opinion, Attitude, and Interest Survey 
The test results are given to the clinic counselor 
before he meets his students, along with confidential 
ratings of each student by one of his high school teach- 
ers and his high school counselor, his secondary 
school record, his medical report, and a two-page in- 
formation form filled out by his parents. 

After the enrollee arrives on campus, he also is 
given a three-hour test to determine his mental acuity. 
The clinic's counseling work is not confined to 
helping the student see himself. It also provides two 
one - hour interviews between counselor and parents 
— one at the beginning and one at the end of the 
clinic. In these interviews, parents are given pro- 
fessional insight into their sons and daughters. The 
parents receive individual help to guide them to an 
evaluation of their own roles in the children's choice 
of a vocation. Sometimes parents unconsciously push 
a student toward an occupation in which his chances 



for success are poor and ignore entirely his real ap- 
titude and promise in another field. 

Counselors mince no words; they assume that 
parents and students want the facts. If a father is 
pushing his son into medicine and they feel he is 
limited in scientific aptitude, but has ability in teach- 
ing, they say so. Many potential failures can be avoid- 
ed by helping both students and parents face natural 
limitations. 

On the other hand, the clinic has sometimes been 
the means of stimulating a student who, in his own 
mind, has written o5 college. One such student, now 




doing very well at Susquehanna, was dead - set against 
college when he attended the clinic several years ago. 
The success of the clinic has been vouched for 
in at least three ways. Fust, of course, has been the 
testimony of the students themselves. In evaluation 
sheets filled out by the students, they were asked: 
"Did you feel the clinic proved beneficial to you? If 
so, how?" The answer to the first of these ques- 
tions was a resounding "Yes." Comment after com- 
ment emphasized the help that students received: 
"It improved my knowledge of my voca- 
tional aptitudes and broadened my horizons." 

"I have learned a great deal about myself, 
such as hidden desires to accomplish my goals 
and new interest fields." 

"I feel it pin - pointed my strengths and 
weaknesses. It was not really much of a sur- 
prise, but after a few 7 lectures I learned the im- 
portance of the potential I had really been wast- 
ing." 

"I was so mixed up when I came, and it 
did a great deal to straigthen me out." 
Some six months after one of the clinics, Dr. 
Poison received a Christmas greeting from a student 
that needs no comment: 



WINTER 1968 



ALUMNI WEEKEND 1968 

Schedule of Events 

Friday. May 3 

12:00 - 2:00 p.m. Golf and Bridge Tournaments, Susquehanna Valley Country Club 
7:30 p.m. May Queen Coronation, Chapel- Auditorium 
8:00 p.m. Musical: "The Pirates of Penzance" Gilbert and Sullivan 
9:00 p.m. Informal Gathering, Warren Pirie's Home 

Saturday, May 4 

9:00 a.m. Registration at the Big Tent (all day) 

9:30 - 11:30 a.m. Guided Tours of Campus (every 15 minutes) 

10:30 a.m. Reunion Class Meetings, Bogar Hall 

11:45 a.m. Alumni Awards Luncheon, Big Tent 

1:30 p.m. Baseball doubleheader, S.U. vs. Ithaca College 

3:00 p.m. Musical: "The Pirates of Penzance" Gilbert and Sullivan. 

6:30 p.m. Socl\l Hour, Susquehanna Valley Country Club 

7:30 p.m. Dinner Dance, Susquehanna Valley Country Club 



Sunday, May 5 
11:00 a.m. 

12:00 noon 



Church Service, Chapel-Auditorium 
(Sermon by the Rev. Dr. Harold Ditzler '28) 
Dinner available, Horton Dining Room, Seibert Hall 



"I wanted to tell you that Susquehanna's 
college clinic is one of the best things that has 
ever happened to me. When I applied to col- 
leges in August, I did so with a confident feel- 
ing that I was applying to the right ones. Your 
lectures showed me how to determine the best 
college for me, and what to look for when I 
visited their campuses." 

The student went on to say this of her conference 
with her own high school counselor: 

"By the time the appointment was over I 
was under the impression that I would be lucky 
if a junior college accepted me. I was extremely 
relieved when 1 received early acceptances at 
two colleges." 
Not only students, but parents have spoken highly 
of the clinic. Parents find it gives them insights into 
their own sons and daughters. One father has become 
almost a missionary for the clinic. He found it a means 
of stimulating his son to consider college, although 
the boy had previously seen no value in higher educa- 
tion. 

Some of the most enthusiastic boosters of the 
clinic, however, have been the counselors themselves. 



All of them seem to come away from the clinic with 
a boost in morale. They have time in the clinic set- 
up to do some of the things they would really like to 
do at then schools, but which the demands of their 
work loads prevent. They have the opportunity to 
work intimately with three students in the context 
of a college actually in session. If a student is inter- 
ested in the study of medicine, he can walk over to 
the science building and get a first - hand account from 
a faculty member in the field about what medical 
school will demand of him. 

Counselors are teamed so that they also can con- 
fer witli each other about their evaluations and opin- 
ions. One of the counselors was so impressed with 
Susquehanna's program that lie sent his own son to 
the university. 

Although it is run on a non - profit basis, the cost 
of the clinic may seem high at first glance — $110.00 
for the five - day period. But in terms of the profes- 
sional guidance each student receives, it is indeed a 
bargain. The fee for taking a single test can run as 
high as $25 and the standard cost of a short series of 
tests, with a one - hour interpretation of their results. 
is $50 at most colleges. 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




NOMINATIONS: Dorothy Eilhardt Gundrum '48, 
Harry W. Butts Jr. '48 (chairman). Merle Beam 
'22, Donald C. Berninger '52. 




-".-.'■ 



LOYALTY FUND: Dorothy Rothermel Chaffee '28, Charles E. 
Chaffee '27, Erie I. Shobert II (chairman), Marlyn R. Fetterolf 
'23, Raymond P. Garman '30, Charles H. Carr '52, James C. 
Gehris '50. Members reviewed the 1967 Loyalty Fund Campaign. 




0.UMNI WEEKEND, seated: Florence Rothermel Latsha '40, H. Nathan Ward '63, 
Its. Harold Ditzler, John F. Hanna '35 (chairman), Jack P. Shipe '40, Simon B. 
Ihoads '30. Standing: Harold Ditzler '28, John Ayer '68, R. L. Lubold '13, Jack 
Valsh '43, Mrs. Jack Walsh, Robert A. Boyer '38, Mrs. Robert A. Boyer. 



HARRISBURG 

WORKSHOP 

1968 




AWARDS: Mable Kinzey Fetterolf '24, Donald Wissinger '50, 
Chester G. Rowe '52 (chairman), Dale Bringman '48, Louise 
Mehring Koontz '35, Timothy Barnes '35, H. Vernon Blough 
•31. 




CLUB ACTIVITIES, seated: W. Elwyn Taylor '08, Winifred 
Myers O'Dell '49, Harold Shaffer '40 (chairman), Janis Adams 
John '59, John Hendricks '57, Ruth Naylor Shaffer '41. Stand- 
ing: Lynn Lerew '63, Paul Wagner '50, Frank Fetterolf '48, 
Larry John. 



WINTER 1968 



I 



1967 Alumni Loyalty Fund 

Second Report 

PRESIDENT'S CLUB 



Guy M. Bogar '21 
"Mabel Kinzey Fetterolf '24, in honor 
of her husband, Marlvn R. Fetter- 
olf '23 
Roger M. Blough '25 
Elizabeth Hauser Kinsel '28 
"Harold H. Renning, in memory of 
his wife, Ethel Weikert Renning 
'29 



"Ralph M. Kendall, in memory of his 
wife, Lyla Kimball Kendall '29 

John H. Wall '30 

Preston H, Smith '38 

Eleanor Robison Landes hon'60 
"Sidney D. Gamble he'64 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 



"Maria Geiselman Gabrielson '13 
"Elizabeth Hall Neideigh '17 
Ralph W. '20 ( deceased ) and 
Loretta Edwards Woodruff 
"Alma V. McCollough '24 



"Simon B. '30 and Kathryn Jarrett 
Rlioads x'34 
° "Glenn L. Musser '41 
"Rine G. '46 and .Lois Winey, friend 



Margaret Arbogast Morgan '04 

Grace A. Geiselman '09 

John W. Thompson '09 

William M. Duck 11 

R. L. Lubold '13 

J. Frank Faust '15 

Mabel Steffen Broscious '21 

C. Howard Rothfuss '22 

Marlyn R. Fetterolf '23 
"Alice Rearick '23 

Bryan C. Bothfuss '23 

W. Alfred Streamer '26 
"Parke R. Wagner '26 
"Essex Botsford Wagner '28 
"George E. Beam '29 

Clarence E. Phillips '29 
"Kathryn P. Reed '29 

Helen K. Weaver '29 

Russell C. Heim '30 

"Myer R. Musser Sr. '30 

Bryce E. '31 and Ruth Goff Nico- 
demus '30 

Luke H. '30 and Virginia Andrews 
Rhoads x'34 

Marie W. Blough, friend of the class 
of '31 

Paul M. Haines '31 

W. Michael Weader x'31 

William E. Rover '33 

Ruth Bergstresser Koch '34 

Lester J. Karschner '37 

Ray W. Kline '38 



CENTURY CLUB 

Vemon R. Phillips '38 

W. Frank and Isabel Tewkesbury 

Laudenslayer '39 
William H. Gehron Jr. '40 
Harold E. '40 and Ruth Naylor Shaf- 
fer '41 
Jack P. Shipe '40 
Mary Emma Voder Jones '41 
Paul C. Shatto Jr. '41 
Willard H. '41 and Hilda Friederick 

Schadel '40 
Martin W. Hopkins '42 
"Raymond G. '47 and Dorothy Del- 

lecker Hochstuhl '43 
John V. Walsh '43 
James R. Clark '46 
Roswell J. '46 and Gayle Clark Johns 

'47 
Harry W. and Virginia Doss Butts 

'48 
Nevin C. T. '48 and Sara Wormley 

Shaffer x'41 
James C. Gehris '50 
"Raymond C. '50 and Kay Worthing- 

ton Lauver x'52 
"Jeanne M. Orner '50 
Martha Martin Gehris '51 
Shirley A. Young '51 
Charles H. and Voylet Dietz Carr 

'52 
Earl F. '57 and Mary Ann Binga- 

man Klcintop '55 



John C. and Charlotte Meerbach 
Bunke '56 - Morgan Guaranty 
Trust Co. 

"Tames W. Wright '58 

"Jack E. Cisney '59 

"John H. '62 and Nancy Davis Raab 
'61 

Curtis W. Barry '63 

Robert W. Curtis '63 

James A. '65 and Sally Stephenson 

Gibney '63 
"Joyce Steinberg Derby '64 
"Milton H. Maslin Jr. '65 
Seward Prosser and Karen Boyd 
Mellon '65 
"John F. Grebe '65 
"William G. Straus '65 
Charles A. Nicely hon'35 
Charles B. Zimmerman hc'50 
"George L. Haller he '63 
John C. Horn hc'65 
"George B. F. lion '67 and Esther D. 
Tanike, friend 
Norman E. Walz hon'67 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger H. Johnson, 
friends 
"Mr. and Mrs. Wesley A. Orth, 

friends 
"Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Steinberg, 
friends 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



HONOR ROLL OF DONORS 



Second Report 



The final tally for Susque- 
hanna's 1967 Alumni Loyalty 
Fund shows total cash gifts of 
$53,456.93. 

There were 961 donors in all 
— 180 are members of the 
Century Club (gifts of $100 or 
more), 15 of the University 
Club ($250 or more), and 28 
of the President's Club ($500 
or more). The average gift was 
$53.55. 

In addition there were un- 
paid pledges of $33,661.99. If 
these had been paid, our total 
would have been $87,118.92 



1900 

W. Ralph Wagenseller 

1902 

Alice Gortner Fischer '98, in 
memory of her husband, H. 
Hadwin Fischer '02 

1904 

°Margaret Arbogast Morgan, in 
memory of her husband Edward 
M. Morgan '03 

1907 

•D. Franklin Fisher 



1908 

"Ralph W. 



Showers 



1909 

"Grace A. Geiselman 
John W. Thompson 

1910 

Roy Allen DeLong 

1911 

William M. Duck 

1912 

Earle F. Aurande 
Laura M. Knepshield 

1913 

•Maria Geiselman Gabrielson 

1915 

•Jess Pleasanton Coxe 

J. Frank Faust 
•Emma Moyer Masteller 

Gertrude F. Weaver 

1916 

J. Paul Harman 

1919 

•Christine Schoch Cassler 
M. Marion Weaver 

1920 

Evelyn Allison Boeder 

1921 

Guy M. Bogar 
Mabel Steffen Broscious 
Ruth LaRue Thompson 
Mildred E. Winston 

1922 

Beatrice Fisher Dunning 
•Jay H. Fleckenstine 

1923 

•Dorothy Margerum App 

Martyn R. Fetterolf 
•Mary Beck Grant 
•Alice Rearick 

Bryan C. Rothfuss 

Thomas J. Weible 



1924 

W. John Derr 
°°Mabel Kinzey Fetterolf, in honor 

of her husband, Marlyn R. 

Fetterolf '23 
Lottie Brosius Kepner 
Raymond W. Klinedinst 
Helen J. Rearick 

1925 

Roger M. Blough 
•Lewis R. Drumm 
C. Ralph Gramley 
Robert J. Keeler 

1926 

T. E. Ebberts 
Harold S. Faust 
Mabel Dagle Gramley 
Martha Larson Martin 
Austin C. Roche 
W. Alfred Streamer 
Oliver S. Swisher 
Luther M. Weaver Jr. 

1927 

Delsey Morris Gross 
Emily McElwee Jamison 
Anna Brosious Klinedinst 
•H. Luther Hhodes 
Brooks L. Walton 

1928 
•Harold F. Doebler 

Ruth Folkmann 

Grace Williams Keller 

Elizabeth Hauser Kinsel 

Mary Weimer Moffitt 
•Claire E. Scholvin 

Marvin W. Schlegel 

Prudence Wilson Weaver 

1929 

•George E. Beam 

Adam P. Bingaman 
•Ellen E. Bonney 
•Henry R. Carichner 

Lee S. Deppen 

Marian Klinger Derrick 

Helen Carter Gehret 

Sara R. Hamlin 

Man Shaffer Heinze 

Charles E. Hilbish 
•Ruth Dively Kaufman 

Ralph M. Kendall, in memory' of 
his wife, Lvla Kimball Kendall 
'29 

Clarence E. Phillips 
•Katherine P. Reed 
•Harold H. Reuning, in memory* of 
his wife, Ethel Weikert Reun- 
ing '29 

Raymond O. Rhine 

Walter W. Swank 

Frank C. Wagenseller 

L. Arthur Wagner 

Frank W. Weaver 

Helen K. Weaver 

1930 

Donald A. Gaver 
Sherman E. Good 
Russell C. Heim 
•Myer R. Musser Sr. 
Ruth Goff Nicodemus 
Luke H. Rhoads 
John H. Wall 

1931 

•Lois Brungart Bendigo 

Marie W. Blough ( Mrs. H. 
Vernon ) , friend 

Frank C. Gill 

Paul M. Haines 

Arlene Laudenslager Hatton 

Leone Holtzapple Hogue 

Julia Morgan McCloskey 

Bryce E. Nicodemus 
•Helen E. O'Connell 
•Charles J. Shearer 



•W. Michael Weader 
•Ethlyime Miller Weaver 

1932 

Samuel Brosius 
Roscoe L. Fisher 
Robert G. Hartman 
•Herbert G. Hohman 

1933 

Beatrice Gentzler Armold 
Frederick L. Carl 
Selon F. Dockey 
John P. and Anna Moody 

Edwards 
Martin Anthony Graykoskie 
William E. Royer 
Frances Stambaugh Shade 

1934 

Russell X. Carmichael 

E. M. Clapper 

P. Richard Fisher 

Nelson J. King 

Ruth Bergstresser Koch 

Pauline Crow Mount 

Virginia Andrews Rhoads 

Richard B. Shade 

James C. Suter 

Sara Ulrich Tollinger 

1935 

Charles G. Jones 

1936 

Allen J. Eyer 
•James A. Grossman 
Horace M. Hutchison 
Ruth Williamson Kelly 
•Frances S. Sassaman, in memory 
of her husband, Robert S. 
Sassaman x'36 
•Ralph I. Shockey 

1937 

Newton E. Hess 
•Lester J. Karschner 
•Elsie Myers 

Frances Smith Novinger 

B. Henry Shafer 

Margaret Roush Shekletski 
•Man.' Barnes Topper 

Man Ann Fox Wagenseller 

1938 

Ethel Ramer Coulter 
Ray W. Kline 
Vernon R. Phillips 
Verlin H. Smalts 
Preston H. Smith 

1939 

John W. and Adelaide Stewart 

Hostetter 
John R. Knaul 
W. Frank and Isabel Tewkesbury 

Laudenslayer 
Mathilda Neudoerffer Powell 
•Martha Klinger Riegel 
•M. Jane Schnure 

1940 

John D. Bice 

Edward E. Eisenhart 

William H. Gehron Jr. 
•John G. Gensel 

Horace A. Kauffman 

Florence Rothermel Latsha 

William E. Nye 

Paul M. Orso 

Robert G. Sander 

Hilda Friederick Schadel 

Harold E. Shaffer 
•Bamer S. Swartz 

1941 

Elaine Miller Hunt 
Mary' Emma Yoder Jones 
Ruth Specht Richter 
William H. Schadel 
Ruth Naylor Shaffer 
Sara Wormley Shaffer 



1942 

Nelvin E. Haas 
Delphine Hoover Reitz 

1943 

Dorothy Dellecker Hochstuhl 
Mary Cox Moore 
•Jessie Walton Schmitthenner 
John V. Walsh 

1944 

•Helen Hocker Schueler 
Catherine Byrod Whitman 

1945 

"Marian Willard Dowlin 

J. R. Gehman Sr. 
•Audrey Dodge Gensel 

Corinne Kahn Kramer 
•Herman G. Stuempfle 

1946 

Albert L. Cage Jr. 

James R. Clark 
•Marie Klick Hodick 

Roswell J. Johns 
•Norma Hazen Jones 

Marjorie Barton Myers 
•C. Glenn Schueler 
•Rine G. Winey 

1947 

Eugene P. Grandolini 
•Raymond G. Hochstuhl 
Gayle Clark Johns 
Richard D. Moglia 

1948 

Harry W. and Virginia Doss ButtJ 

Frank K. Fetterolf 

Donald L. Herrold 
•Sara Smith Ivers 

Harold R. Kramer 

Marlin P. Krouse 

Richard W. and Gertrude Roberts 
Lindemann 
•Kenneth D. Loss 
•Roberta Goetz Palmer 

Robert W. Radell 

Nevro C. T. Shaffer 

1949 

Douglas E. Arthur 

Irma Strawbridge Hallenbeck 

Juanita Keller Hartle 

Robert S. and Nancy Everett 
Hoover 

John C. Meerbach 

Kenneth M. Merz 

Winifred Myers Odell 

Warren S. and Margaret Latta 
Outerbrige 
•Dolores Mattson Ristine 

Helen Smith Sanders 

Joyce Bottdorff Sheaffer 
•Ralph H. Tietbohl Jr. 

1950 

Susan Kline Bennett 

Earl L. Bemstine 
•Henry G. Chadwick 

Harold S. Greenly 

James C. Gehris 

Charles H. Grund 

Floris Guyer Hains 

Barbara Watkins Hartley 
•Patricia Houtz 
•Raymond C. Lauver 

Doris Janson Meerbach 
•Jeanne M. Orner 

Janet Wolf Statler 
•Paul A. Wagner 

Donald E. Wissinger 

1951 

•Marsh C. Bogar 
•Hazel Brobst Brown 

Martha Martin Gehris 
•Susan Foltz Tietbohl 

Fern Baumgardner Weaver 

Shirley A. Young 



WINTER 1968 



13 





BOX 


SCORE 






1967 




Ai 


umni Loyalty 


Fund 




Living 


Contri- 




Class Members 


butors 


Cash 


X 




2 $ 


1.00 


1891 


1 






1894 


1 






1896 


1 


1 


10.00 


1898 


2 


2 


575.00 


1899 


2 




100.00 


1900 


3 




50.00 


1901 


2 




10.00 


1902 


9 


2 


50.00 


1903 


5 




10.00 


1904 


10 




100.00 


1905 


4 




2.00 


1906 


9 




225.00 


1907 


7 




5.00 


1908 


18 


2 


45.00 


1909 


21 


3 


400.00 


1910 


9 


2 


60.00 


1911 


12 


1 


100.00 


1912 


14 


2 


30.00 


1913 


13 


6 


619.00 


1914 


17 


4 


120.00 


1915 


27 


8 


260.00 


1916 


22 


3 


600.00 


1917 


29 


5 


487.50 


1918 


23 


5 


1 15.00 


1919 


31 


5 


515.00 


1920 


35 


4 


327.50 


1921 


52 


8 


1,082.50 


1922 


43 


6 


850.00 


1923 


39 


12 


682.50 


1924 


47 


10 


1,745.00 


1925 


58 


12 


983.00 


1926 


77 


15 


1,391.00 


1927 


86 


13 


335.00 


1928 


139 


26 


4,1 14.00 


1929 


136 


35 


1,521.00 


1930 


116 


16 


2,005.00 


1931 


135 


21 


1,913.50 


1932 


99 


13 


284.00 


1933 


86 


14 


518.50 


1934 


86 


19 


679.50 


1935 


77 


10 


2,290.00 


1936 


72 


13 


418.00 


1937 


54 


15 


1,376.65 


1938 


56 


10 


1,625.00 


1939 


60 


19 


987.00 


1940 


84 


19 


3,964.50 


1941 


64 


16 


888.00 


1942 


71 


12 


585.00 


1943 


52 


10 


997.50 


1944 


42 


7 


90.00 


1945 


36 


9 


822.50 


1946 


36 


9 


512.50 


1947 


65 


10 


365.00 


1948 


89 


25 


835.00 


1949 


132 


26 


380.00 


1950 


143 


25 


580.00 


1951 


90 


16 


593.00 


1952 


108 


21 


800.00 


1953 


106 


21 


271.00 


1954 


120 


20 


637.50 


1955 


78 


13 


341.00 


1956 


106 


19 


526.50 


1957 


103 


19 


346.00 


1958 


116 


15 


412.50 


1959 


138 


17 


305.00 


1960 


133 


19 


250.50 


1961 


131 


23 


358.50 


1962 


187 


27 


442.00 


1963 


246 


26 


470.50 


1964 


282 


28 


501.00 


1965 


353 


33 


515.00 


1966 


317 


19 


185.00 


1967 


373 


20 


169.50 


Honoraries 


33 


6,824.28 


Others 




19 


1,067.00 


Match 


ng Gifts 33 




TOTALS 


961 $53,456.93 



1952 

Donald C. Berninger 

C. Dale Gateman 

Patricia F. Heathcote 
"Kay Worthington Lauvei 

Lorraine Rarick Liddington 

David G. Parker 
° William H. Prichard 
•Lynne Lightfoot Rambo 

1953 

Harmon L. Andrews 

William C. Davenport - Aetna Life 

& Casualty Co. 
Bruce Maples 
Thomas E. Marts Jr. 
T. Justin Myers Jr. 
Dean E. Rupe 
Arthur W. and Lillian Whitting- 

ton Roush 
Ernest R. Walker 
Margaret Zinda Weaver 
Gunnar Zorn 

1954 

Henry R. All-right 
Wallace E. Gordon 
"Marlin V. Heffner 

Irene Oldt Huss 

Edward E. Lamb Jr. 

George C. Liddington 

Charlotte Neuman Marts 

Jayne Daily PetHt 

Eleanore Steffey Rachau 

lames "Mike" Rising 

Rodger E. Rohrbaugh 

Barbara Morris Zorn 

1955 

Shirlev Decker Gateman 

Daniel O. Hoy 

Mary Ann Bingaman Kleintop 

Carol Cornelius Lamb 

Ruth Scott Nunn 

Ignatius J. Purta 

1956 

" Evelyn Herbstrith Baker 
Nancy McCullough 

1957 

°i\ancy Rae Airland 

Lynn Hassinger Askew 

Carolyn Frantz Brimschwyler 

Park H. Haussler 

Max J. Herman 

Earl F. Kleintop 

Peter M. Nunn 
Dorothy Wardle Spencer 
"Patricia A. Walker 

Joan Raudenbush Wendel 

1958 

00 Mary Louise Neal Coleman 
Vernon V. Hoover 
Janice Paul 
Lee Erhohn Smith 

1959 

Ronald G. Aller 

James T. Bayruns 

William M. Berger 
Mack E. Cisney 
°Mary F. Davis 
Robert L. Fiscus 

L. Frances Wirt Fisher 
"Gerald O. Fletcher 

Denece Newhard Haussler 
"Susan Lehman iVorthnip 
"Eleanor K. Pourron 
"Ray J. Yeingst 

I960 

Joan Heslop Bayruns 
"Donald E. Coleman 
Margaret Henderson Davenport - 

Aetna Life & Casualty Co. 
Bonnie Gilfillan Eyre 
Clecne Hohmaii 
C. Wesley Hunt 

Sally McCahan 

P.icilla Lantz McNitt 
"Stephanie Haase Moore 
^Richard D. Reichard 
"Allen I. Rowe 

Willi K. E. Weichelt 



14 



1961 

Barbara Angle Aller 

Gilbert C. Askew 
"Sandra Schell Dean 

Richard E. Derrick 

Richard L. Fausey 
"Linda Traub Fiscus 

Thomas P. Helvig 

Linda K. Leonard 
"Gary L. Moore 
"Nancy Davis Raab 
"W. Frank and Margaret Panian 

Rieger 
"Janice Stahl Snyder 
"Robert A. Welker 

1962 

Phyllis Betz 
"Leslie R. Butler 
Ned S. Coates 

"Joan Whitson Fletcher 

Judith Diehle Hunt 
"William H. Kahl 

Wayne H. Minami 

Grace Johnson Murphy 
"John H. Raab 
"Robert A. Smith 
"John H. Spillman 
"Susan Turnbach Steigenvalt 

Roger B. Trexler 

Lois Master Van Zanten 
"Audrey Kellert Yeingst 

1963 

"Lynda L. Dries 
"Patricia Estep Dysart 

Naomi Weaver Grondahl 

Joe W. Kleinbauer 
"Marvin J. Malone 

Carl M. Moyer 
"Carol Shesler Rowe 
"Anita Ruhling Sapp 

Georgiann Brodisch Skinner 

Rudolph J. Van der Hiel 

1964 

"Alan Bachrach 

Antony W. Colombet 
"Joyce Steinberg Derby 

Albert W. Grondahl 

Judy Polhemus Hawkes 
""Fred G. Hershey 
"Lloyd R. Hettenbach 
"Richard E. Howe Jr. 

Grace Simington Karschner 
"Yynn Pfister Knight 
"Joseph III and Arlene Roberts 

O'Hara 
"James T. Parks 
"Michael E. Rupprecht 

James M. Skinner 

Ann Latimer Strate 

James W. Summers 

Kathye Wasson Unglaub 

1965 

Stacey L. Bottiger 
"Nancy Corson Carter 
"Muriel Hartline Folk 

Robert A. Good 
"John F. Grebe 

Richard W. Hafer 
"Bonita Schaffer Hettenbach 

Richard S. Karschner 
"Milton M. Kuhn 
•Carolyn Tweed Leap 
"Richard E. Linder 
"Milton H. Maslin Jr. 

Seward Prosser and Karen Boyd 
Mellon 
"Robert J. Reed Jr. 
" K > L. Reichley 
"William G. Straus 

Barbara Evans Summers 
"Avirelie Toconita Laurence 

Alfred M. Unglaub 

William A. Vogel 

Robert N. Jr. and Janet Clark 
Watts 

1966 

"Georgia Feglcv Boyer 
"John H. Clapham 



Nancylee Cranmer 
"Sue C. Davis 
"Harold A. Freed 

Peter C. Friedman 

Linda Carnthers Good 

Frederick W. Kelly Jr. 
"James M. Knox Jr. 
"Marilyn Moltu 
"Dena Sebastian Parks 
"Virginia Payne 

Gregory J. Reiff 
"Thomas J. and Jane Hunter Young 

1967 

"Susan Brumfield Ambacher 
"Nancy Baker 

Charles S. Bander II 
"Robert D. and Beverly Walker 
Bortz 

Eleanore "Sue" M. Finnegan 
"Edna M. Fricker 
•Penney Graham 

Barbara Ann Kaufmann 
"Robert R. Jr. and Carolyn Wahler 

Miller 
"Nancy V. Orr 

Lynn E. Persing 

Clowie McLaughlin Reift 
"Andrea Schumann 
"Gary R. Seifert 
"John J. Stankiewicz 

Ronald W. Williams 
"William H. Wrege 



Honoraries 

Maurice Brooks hc*67 
Sidney D. Gamble hc*64 

"George L. Haller hc'63 
Eleanor Robison Landes hon*60 

"Vernon E. Leslie 
Kenneth F. Mailloux hon'62 
Charles A. Nicely hon'35 
Raymond C. Shindler hc'59 

"George R. F. hon'67 and Esther 
D. Tamke, friend 
William W. Tomlinson he'54 
Norman E. Walz hon'67 
Charles B. Zimmerman hc"50 



Others 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Helvig 
"Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Ingram 

J and L Company 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger H. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Manning 
"Mr. and Mrs. Wesley A. Orth 
"Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. 
Steinberg 

Matching Gifts 

Burlington Industries Foundation 

Clevite Corp. 

Columbia Broadcasting System 

Foundation, Inc. 
Connecticut General Life 

Insurance Co. 
Dun and Bradstreet Foundation, 

Inc. 
The Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. 
The First Pennsylvania Banking 

and Trust Co. 
Hershey Chocolate Corp. 
Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. 
Mutual of New York 
Nationwide Foundation 
The New York Times Foundation 
Pittsburgh National Bank 
Pennsylvania Power & Light Co. 
Schering Corp. 
The Singer Co. 

Texas Eastern Transmission Corp. 
The Textron Foundation Trust 
Towers, Perrin, Forster & Crosby, 

Inc. 
United States Trust Co. of N. Y. 

"Toward purpose other than Gym 

oa T(mard ]tath Gym mid another 
purpose 

SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



A Special Report 






The 

Plain Fact Is . . 

. . . our colleges and 
universities "are facing 
what might easily 
become a crisis" 

Our colleges and universities, over the last 20 years, have 
experienced an expansion that is without precedent — in build- 
ings and in budgets, in students and in professors, in reputation 
and in rewards — in power and pride and in deserved prestige. As 
we try to tell our countrymen that we are faced with imminent 
bankruptcy, we confront the painful fact that in the eyes of the 
American people — and I think also in the eyes of disinterested 
observers abroad — we are a triumphant success. The observers 
seem to believe — and I believe myself — that the American cam- 
pus ranks with the American corporation among the handful of 
first-class contributions which our civilization has made to the 
annals of human institutions. We come before the country to 
plead financial emergency at a time when our public standing 
has never been higher. It is at the least an unhappy accident of 
timing. 

— McGeorge Bundy 

President, The Ford Foundation 




A Special Report 



A state-supported UNIVERSITY in the Midwest makes 
/% a sad announcement: With more well-qualified 
/ — % applicants for its freshman class than ever be- 
A. JL^fore, the university must tighten its entrance 
requirements. Qualified though the kids are, the univer- 
sity must turn many of them away. 

► A private college in New England raises its tuition 
fee for the seventh time since World War II. In doing 
so, it admits ruefully: "Many of the best high-school 
graduates can't afford to come here, any more." 

► A state college network in the West, long regarded 
as one of the nation's finest, cannot offer its students 
the usual range of instruction this year. Despite inten- 
sive recruiting, more than 1,000 openings on the faculty 
were unfilled at the start of the academic year. 

► A church-related college in the South, whose de- 
nomination's leaders believe in strict separation of church 
and state, severs its church ties in order to seek money 
from the government. The college must have such money, 
say its administrators — or it will die. 

Outwardly, America's colleges and universities ap- 
pear more affluent than at any time in the past. In the 
aggregate they have more money, more students, more 
buildings, better-paid faculties, than ever before in their 
history. 

Yet many are on the edge of deep trouble. 

"The plain fact," in the words of the president of 
Columbia University, "is that we are facing what might 
easily become a crisis in the financing of American higher 
education, and the sooner we know about it, the better 
off we will be." 

The trouble is not limited to a few institutions. 
Nor does it affect only one or two types of 
institution. Large universities, small colleges; 
state-supported and privately supported: the 
problem faces them all. 

Before preparing this report, the editors asked more 
than 500 college and university presidents to tell us — 
off the record, if they preferred — just how they viewed 
the future of their institutions. With rare exceptions, the 
presidents agreed on this assessment: That the money is 
not now in sight to meet the rising costs of higher educa- 
tion . . . to serve the growing numbers of bright, qualified 
students . . . and to pay for the myriad activities that Amer- 
icans now demand of their colleges and universities. 
Important programs and necessary new buildings are 



A 



LL of us are hard-put to see where we are going 
to get the funds to meet the educational demands 
of the coming decade. 

— A university president 



being deferred for lack of money, the presidents said. 
Many admitted to budget-tightening measures reminis- 
cent of those taken in days of the Great Depression. 

Is this new? Haven't the colleges and universities al- 
ways needed money? Is there something different about 
the situation today? 

The answer is "Yes" — to all three questions. 

The president of a large state university gave us this 
view of the over-all situation, at both the publicly and 
the privately supported institutions of higher education: 

"A good many institutions of higher learning are 
operating at a deficit," he said. "First, the private col- 
leges and universities: they are eating into their endow- 
ments in order to meet their expenses. Second, the public 
institutions. It is not legal to spend beyond our means, 
but here we have another kind of deficit: a deficit in 
quality, which will be extremely difficult to remedy even 
when adequate funding becomes available." 

Other presidents' comments were equally revealing: 

► From a university in the Ivy League: "Independent 
national universities face an uncertain future which 
threatens to blunt their thrust, curb their leadership, and 
jeopardize their independence. Every one that I know 
about is facing a deficit in its operating budget, this 
year or next. And all of us are hard-put to see where we 
are going to get the funds to meet the educational de- 
mands of the coming decade." 

► From a municipal college in the Midwest: "The best 
word to describe our situation is 'desperate.' We are 
operating at a deficit of about 20 per cent of our total 
expenditure." 

► From a private liberal arts college in Missouri: "Only 
by increasing our tuition charges are we keeping our 
heads above water. Expenditures are galloping to such 
a degree that I don't know how we will make out in the 
future." 

► From a church-related university on the West Coast: 
"We face very serious problems. Even though our tuition 
is below-average, we have already priced ourselves out of 
part of our market. We have gone deeply into debt for 
dormitories. Our church support is declining. At times, 
the outlook is grim." 

► From a state university in the Big Ten: "The bud- 
get for our operations must be considered tight. It is 
less than we need to meet the demands upon the univer- 
sity for teaching, research, and public service." 

► From a small liberal arts college in Ohio: "We are 



on a hand-to-mouth, 'kitchen' economy. Our ten-year 
projections indicate that we can maintain our quality 
only by doubling in size." 

► From a small college in the Northeast: "For the 
first time in its 1 50-year history, our college has a planned 
deficit. We are holding our heads above water at the 
moment — but, in terms of quality education, this can- 
not long continue without additional means of support." 

► From a state college in California: "We are not 
permitted to operate at a deficit. The funding of our bud- 
get at a level considerably below that proposed by the 
trustees has made it difficult for us to recruit staff mem- 
bers and has forced us to defer very-much-needed im- 
provements incur existing activities." 

► From a women's college in the South: "For the 
coming year, our budget is the tightest we have had in 
my fifteen years as president." 

What's gone wrong? 
Talk of the sort quoted above may 
seem strange, as one looks at the un- 
paralleled growth of America's colleges 
and universities during the past decade: 

► Hardly a campus in the land does not have a brand- 
new building or one under construction. Colleges and 
universities are spending more than $2 billion a year for 
capital expansion. 

► Faculty salaries have nearly doubled in the past 
decade. (But in some regions they are still woefully low.) 

► Private, voluntary support to colleges and univer- 
sities has more than tripled since 1958. Higher educa- 
tion's share of the philanthropic dollar has risen from 
1 1 per cent to 17 per cent. 

► State tax funds appropriated for higher education 
have increased 44 per cent in just two years, to a 1967-68 
total of nearly $4.4 billion. This is 214 per cent more than 
the sum appropriated eight years ago. 

► Endowment funds have more than doubled over 
the past decade. They're now estimated to be about S12 
billion, at market value. 

► Federal funds going to institutions of higher educa- 
tion have more than doubled in four years. 

► More than 300 new colleges and universities have 
been founded since 1945. 

► All in all, the total expenditure this year for U.S. 
higher education is some $18 billion — more than three 
times as much as in 1955. 



Moreover, America's colleges and universities have 
absorbed the tidal wave of students that was supposed to 
have swamped them by now. They have managed to ful- 
fill their teaching and research functions and to under- 
take a variety of new public-service programs — despite 
the ominous predictions of faculty shortages heard ten 
or fifteen years ago. Says one foundation official: 

"The system is bigger, stronger, and more productive 
than it has ever been, than any system of higher educa- 
tion in the world." 

Why, then, the growing concern? 

Re-examine the progress of the past ten years, and 
this fact becomes apparent: The progress was great — 
but it did not deal with the basic flaws in higher educa- 
tion's financial situation. Rather, it made the whole en- 
terprise bigger, more sophisticated, and more expensive. 

Voluntary contributions grew — but the complexity and 
costliness of the nation's colleges and universities grew 
faster. 

Endowment funds grew — but the need for the income 
from them grew faster. 

State appropriations grew — but the need grew faster. 

Faculty salaries were rising. New courses were needed, 
due to the unprecedented "knowledge explosion." More 
costly apparatus was required, as scientific progress grew 
more complex. Enrollments burgeoned — and students 
stayed on for more advanced (and more expensive) train- 
ing at higher levels. 

And, for most of the nation's 2,300 colleges and uni- 
versities, an old problem remained — and was intensified, 
as the costs of education rose: gifts, endowment, and 
government funds continued to go, disproportionately, 
to a relative handful of institutions. Some 36 per cent of 
all voluntary contributions, for example, went to just 55 
major universities. Some 90 per cent of all endowment 
funds were owned by fewer than 5 per cent of the insti- 
tutions. In 1966, the most recent year reported, some 70 
per cent of the federal government's funds for higher 
education went to 100 institutions. 

McGeorge Bundy, the president of the Ford Founda- 
tion, puts it this way: 

"Great gains have been made; the academic profession 
has reached a wholly new level of economic strength, 
and the instruments of excellence — the libraries and 



Drawings by Peter Hooven 







E 



ach new attempt at a massive solution has left 
the trustees and presidents just where they started. 

■ — A foundation president 



laboratories — are stronger than ever. But the university 
that pauses to look back will quickly fall behind in the 
endless race to the future." 

Mr. Bundy says further: 

"The greatest general problem of higher education is 
money .... The multiplying needs of the nation's col- 
leges and universities force a recognition that each new 
attempt at a massive solution has left the trustees and 
presidents just where they started: in very great need." 

The financial problems of higher education 
are unlike those, say, of industry. Colleges and 
universities do not operate like General Mo- 
tors. On the contrary, they sell their two pri- 
mary services — teaching and research — at a loss. 

It is safe to say (although details may differ from 
institution to institution) that the American college or 
university student pays only a fraction of the cost of his 
education. 

This cost varies with the level of education and with 
the educational practices of the institution he attends. 
Undergraduate education, for instance, costs less than 
graduate education — which in turn may cost less than 
medical education. And the cost of educating a student 
in the sciences is greater than in the humanities. What- 
ever the variations, however, the student's tuition and 
fees pay only a portion of the bill. 

"As private enterprises," says one president, "we don't 
seem to be doing so well. We lose money every time we 
take in another student." 

Of course, neither he nor his colleagues on other 
campuses would have it otherwise. Nor, it seems clear, 
would most of the American people. 

But just as student instruction is provided at a sub- 
stantial reduction from the actual cost, so is the research 
that the nation's universities perform on a vast scale for 
the federal government. On this particular below-cost 
service, as contrasted with that involving the provision 
of education to their students, many colleges and univer- 
sities are considerably less than enthusiastic. 

In brief: The federal government rarely pays the full 
cost of the research it sponsors. Most of the money goes 
for direct costs (compensation for faculty time, equip- 
ment, computer use, etc.) Some of it goes for indirect 
costs (such "overhead" costs of the institution as payroll 
departments, libraries, etc.). Government policy stipu- 
lates that the institutions receiving federal research grants 




v 




must share in the cost of the research by contributing, in 
some fashion, a percentage of the total amount of the 
grant. 

University presidents have insisted for many years 
that the government should pay the full cost of the re- 
search it sponsors. Under the present system of cost- 
sharing, they point out, it actually costs their institutions 
money to conduct federally sponsored research. This has 
been one of the most controversial issues in the partner- 
ship between higher education and the federal govern- 
ment, and it continues to be so. 

In commercial terms, then, colleges and universities 
sell their products at a loss. If they are to avoid going 
bankrupt, they must make up — from other sources — the 
difference between the income they receive for their ser- 
vices and the money they spend to provide them. 

With costs spiraling upward, that task becomes ever 
more formidable. 

Here are some of the harsh facts: Operating ex- 
penditures for higher education more than 
tripled during the past decade — from about $4 
billion in 1956 to $12.7 billion last year. By 
1970, if government projections are correct, colleges and 
universities will be spending over $18 billion for their 
current operations, plus another $2 billion or $3 billion 
for capital expansion. 

Why such steep increases in expenditures? There are 
several reasons: 

► Student enrollment is now close to 7 million — 
twice what it was in 1960. 

► The rapid accumulation of new knowledge and a 
resulting trend toward specialization have led to a broad- 
ening of the curricula, a sharp increase in graduate study, 
a need for sophisticated new equipment, and increased 
library acquisitions. All are very costly. 

► An unprecedented growth in faculty salaries — long 
overdue — has raised instructional costs at most institu- 
tions. (Faculty salaries account for roughly half of the 
educational expenses of the average institution of higher 
learning.) 

► About 20 per cent of the financial "growth" during 
the past decade is accounted for by inflation. 

Not only has the over-all cost of higher education in- 
creased markedly, but the cost per student has risen 
steadily, despite increases in enrollment which might, in 
any other "industry," be expected to lower the unit cost. 

Colleges and universities apparently have not im- 
proved their productivity at the same pace as the econ- 
omy generally. A recent study of the financial trends in 
three private universities illustrates this. Between 1905 
and 1966, the educational cost per student at the three 
universities, viewed compositely, increased 20-fold, 
against an economy-wide increase of three- to four-fold. 
In each of the three periods of peace, direct costs per 
student increased about 8 per cent, against a 2 per cent 
annual increase in the economy-wide index. 




Some observers conclude from this that higher educa- 
tion must be made more efficient — that ways must be 
found to educate more students with fewer faculty and 
staff members. Some institutions have moved in this 
direction by adopting a year-round calendar of opera- 
tions, permitting them to make maximum use of the 
faculty and physical plant. Instructional devices, pro- 
grammed learning, closed-circuit television, and other 
technological systems are being employed to increase 
productivity and to gain economies through larger 
classes. 

The problem, however, is to increase efficiency with- 
out jeopardizing the special character of higher educa- 
tion. Scholars are quick to point out that management 
techniques and business practices cannot be applied 
easily to colleges and universities. They observe, for 
example, that on strict cost-accounting principles, a col- 
lege could not justify its library. A physics professor, 
complaining about large classes, remarks: "When you 
get a hundred kids in a classroom, that's not education; 
that's show business." 

The college and university presidents whom we sur- 
veyed in the preparation of this report generally believe 
their institutions are making every dollar work. There is 
room for improvement, they acknowledge. But few feel 
the financial problems of higher education can be signifi- 
cantly reduced through more efficient management. 

One thing seems fairly certain: The costs of 
i higher education will continue to rise. To 
J meet their projected expenses, colleges and 
universities will need to increase their annual 
operating income by more than $4 billion during the 
four-year period between 1966 and 1970. They must find 
another $8 billion or $10 billion for capital outlays. 
Consider what this might mean for a typical privat: 




university. A recent report presented this hypothetical 
case, based on actual projections of university expendi- 
tures and income: 

The institution's budget is now in balance. Its educa- 
tional and general expenditures total S24.5 million a 
year. 

Assume that the university's expenditures per student 
will continue to grow at the rate of the past ten years — 
7.5 per cent annually. Assume, too, that the university's 
enrollment will continue to grow at its rate of the past 
ten years — 3.4 per cent annually. Ten years hence, the 
institution's educational and general expenses would total 
$70.7 million. 

At best, continues the analysis, tuition payments in 
the next ten years will grow at a rate of 6 per cent a year; 
at worst, at a rate of 4 per cent — compared with 9 per 
cent over the past ten years. Endowment income will 
grow at a rate of 3.5 to 5 per cent, compared with 7.7 per 
cent over the past decade. Gifts and grants will grow at 
a rate of 4.5 to 6 per cent, compared with 6.5 per cent 
over the past decade. 

"If the income from private sources grew at the higher 
rates projected," says the analysis, "it would increase 
from $24.5 million to $50.9 million — leaving a deficit of 
$19.8 million, ten years hence. If its income from private 
sources grew at the lower rates projected, it would have 
increased to only $43 million — leaving a shortage of 
$27.8 million, ten years hence." 



In publicly supported colleges and universities, the 
outlook is no brighter, although the gloom is of a differ- 
ent variety. Says the report of a study by two professors 
at the University of Wisconsin: 

"Public institutions of higher education in the United 
States are now operating at a quality deficit of more than 
a billion dollars a year. In addition, despite heavy con- 
struction schedules, they have accumulated a major capi- 
tal lag." 

The deficit cited by the Wisconsin professors is a com- 
putation of the cost of bringing the public institutions' 
expenditures per student to a level comparable with that 
at the private institutions. With the enrollment growth 
expected by 1975, the professors calculate, the "quality 
deficit" in public higher education will reach $2.5 billion. 

The problem is caused, in large part, by the tremendous 
enrollment increases in public colleges and universities. 
The institutions' resources, says the Wisconsin study, 
"may not prove equal to the task." 

Moreover, there are indications that public institutions 
may be nearing the limit of expansion, unless they receive 
a massive infusion of new funds. One of every seven pub- 
lic universities rejected qualified applicants from their 
own states last fall; two of every seven rejected qualified 
applicants from other states. One of every ten raised ad- 
missions standards for in-state students; one in six raised 
standards for out-of-state students. 

Will the funds be found to meet the pro- 
jected cost increases of higher education? 
Colleges and universities have tradi- 
tionally received their operating income 
from three sources : from the students, in the form of tui- 
tion and fees; from the state, in the form of legislative 
appropriations; and from individuals, foundations, and 
corporations, in the form of gifts. (Money from the federal 
government for operating expenses is still more of a hope 
than a reality.) 

Can these traditional sources of funds continue to 
meet the need? The question is much on the minds of the 
nation's college and university presidents. 

► Tuition and fees: They have been rising — and are 
likely to rise more. A number of private "prestige" in- 
stitutions have passed the $2,000 mark. Public institutions 
are under mounting pressure to raise tuition and fees, 
and their student charges have been rising at a faster rate 
than those in private institutions. 

The problem of student charges is one of the most 
controversial issues in higher education today. Some feel 
that the student, as the direct beneficiary of an education, 
should pay most or all of its real costs. Others disagree 
emphatically: since society as a whole is the ultimate 
beneficiary, they argue, every student should have the 
right to an education, whether he can afford it or not. 

The leaders of publicly supported colleges and univer- 
sities are almost unanimous on this point: that higher 
tuitions and fees will erode the premise of equal oppor- 



T 



uition: We are reaching a point of diminishing 
returns. — A college president 



It's like buying a second home. 



-A parent 



tunity on which public higher education is based. They 
would like to see the present trend reversed — toward free, 
or at least lower-cost, higher education. 

Leaders of private institutions find the rising tuitions 
equally disturbing. Heavily dependent upon the income 
they receive from students, many such institutions find 
that raising their tuition is inescapable, as costs rise. 
Scores of presidents surveyed for this report, however, 
said that mounting tuition costs are "pricing us out of 
the market." Said one: "As our tuition rises beyond the 
reach of a larger and larger segment of the college-age 
population, we find it more and more difficult to attract 
our quota of students. We are reaching a point of dimin- 
ishing returns." 

Parents and students also are worried. Said one father 
who has been financing a college education for three 
daughters: "It's like buying a second home." 

Stanford Professor Roger A. Freeman says it isn't 
really that bad. In his book, Crisis in College Finance?, 
he points out that when tuition increases have been ad- 
justed to the shrinking value of the dollar or are related 
to rising levels of income, the cost to the student actually 
declined between 1941 and 1961. But this is small consola- 
tion to a man with an annual salary of $15,000 and three 
daughters in college. 

Colleges and universities will be under increasing pres- 
sure to raise their rates still higher, but if they do, they 
will run the risk of pricing themselves beyond the means 
of more and more students. Indeed, the evidence is strong 
that resistance to high tuition is growing, even in rela- 
tively well-to-do families. The College Scholarship Ser- 
vice, an arm of the College Entrance Examination Board, 
reported recently that some middle- and upper-income 
parents have been "substituting relatively low-cost insti- 
tutions" because of the rising prices at some of the na- 
tion's colleges and universities. 

The presidents of such institutions have nightmares 
over such trends. One of them, the head of a private 
college in Minnesota, told us: 

"We are so dependent upon tuition for approximately 
50 per cent of our operating expenses that if 40 fewer 
students come in September than we expect, we could 
have a budgetary deficit this year of $50,000 or more." 

► State appropriations: The 50 states have appropri- 
ated nearly $4.4 billion for their colleges and universities 
this year — a figure that includes neither the $l-$2 billion 
spent by public institutions for capital expansion, nor 
the appropriations of local governments, which account 



for about 10 per cent of all public appropriations for the 
operating expenses of higher education. 

The record set by the states is remarkable — one that 
many observers would have declared impossible, as re- 
cently as eight years ago. In those eight years, the states 
have increased their appropriations for higher education 
by an incredible 214 per cent. 

Can the states sustain this growth in their support of 
higher education? Will they be willing to do so? 

The more pessimistic observers believe that the states 
can't and won't, without a drastic overhaul in the tax 
structures on which state financing is based. The most 
productive tax sources, such observers say, have been 
pre-empted by the federal government. They also believe 
that more and- more state funds will be used, in the fu- 
ture, to meet increasing demands for other services. 

Optimists, on the other hand, are convinced the states 
are far from reaching the upper limits of their ability to 
raise revenue. Tax reforms, they say, will enable states 
to increase their annual budgets sufficiently to meet higher 
education's needs. 

The debate is theoretical. As a staff report to the Ad- 
visory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations con- 
cluded: "The appraisal of a state's fiscal capacity is a 
political decision [that] it alone can make. It is not a 
researchable problem." 

Ultimately, in short, the decision rests with the tax- 
payer. 

► Voluntary private gifts: Gifts are vital to higher 
education. 

In private colleges and universities, they are part of the 
lifeblood. Such institutions commonly budget a deficit, 
and then pray that it will be met by private gifts. 

In public institutions, private gifts supplement state 
appropriations. They provide what is often called "a 
margin for excellence." Many public institutions use such | 
funds to raise faculty salaries above the levels paid for by 
the state, and are thus able to compete for top scholars. 
A number of institutions depend upon private gifts for 
student facilities that the state does not provide. 

Will private giving grow fast enough to meet the grow- 
ing need? As with state appropriations, opinions vary. 

John J. Schwartz, executive director of the American 
Association of Fund-Raising Counsel, feels there is a 
great untapped reservoir. At present, for example, only 
one out of every four alumni and alumnae contributes to 
higher education. And, while American business corpora- 
tions gave an estimated $300 million to education 



in 1965-66, this was only about 0.37 per cent of their net 
income before taxes. On the average, companies contrib- 
ute only about 1.10 per cent of net income before taxes 
to all causes — well below the 5 per cent allowed by the 
Federal government. Certainly there is room for expan- 
sion. 

(Colleges and universities are working overtime to tap 
this reservoir. Mr. Schwartz's association alone lists 117 
colleges and universities that are now campaigning to 
raise a combined total of $4 billion.) 

But others are not so certain that expansion in private 
giving will indeed take place. The 46th annual survey by 
the John Price Jones Company, a firm of fund-raising 
counselors, sampled 50 colleges and universities and found 
a decline in voluntary giving of 8.7 per cent in 12 months. 
The Council for Financial Aid to Education and the 
American Alumni Council calculate that voluntary sup- 
port for higher education in 1965-66 declined by some 
1.2 per cent in the same period. 

Refining these figures gives them more meaning. The 
major private universities, for example, received about 
36 per cent of the $1.2 billion given to higher education 
— a decrease from the previous year. Private liberal arts 
colleges also fell behind: coeducational colleges dropped 
10 per cent, men's colleges dropped 16.2 per cent, and 
women's colleges dropped 12.6 per cent. State institutions, 
on the other hand, increased their private support by 
23.8 per cent. 

The record of some cohesive groups of colleges and 
universities is also revealing. Voluntary support of eight 
Ivy League institutions declined 27.8 per cent, for a total 
loss of $61 million. The Seven College Conference, a 
group of women's colleges, reported a drop of 41 per cent. 
The Associated Colleges of the Midwest dropped about 






«$£»«!&& 



o 



n the question of federal aid, everybody seems 
to be running to the same side of the boat. 

— A college president 



5.5 per cent. The Council of Southern Universities de- 
clined 6.2 per cent. Fifty-five major private universities 
received 7.7 per cent less from gifts. 

Four groups gained. The state universities and colleges 
received 20.5 per cent more in private gifts in 1965-66 
than in the previous year. Fourteen technological insti- 
tutions gained 10.8 per cent. Members of the Great Lakes 
College Association gained 5.6 per cent. And Western 
Conference universities, plus the University of Chicago, 
gained 34.5 per cent. (Within each such group, of course, 
individual colleges may have gained or lost differently 
from the group as a whole.) 

The biggest drop in voluntary contributions came in 

foundation grants. Although this may have been due, in 

I part, to the fact that there had been some unusually large 

J grants the previous year, it may also have been a fore- 

1 taste of things to come. Many of those who observe 

foundations closely think such grants will be harder and 

harder for colleges and universities to come by, in years 

! to come. 

Fearing that the traditional sources of revenue may 
not yield the necessary funds, college and uni- 
versity presidents are looking more and more to 
Washington for the solution to their financial 
problems. 

The president of a large state university in the South, 
whose views are typical of many, told us: "Increased fed- 
eral support is essential to the fiscal stability of the col- 
leges and universities of the land. And such aid is a proper 
federal expenditure." 

Most of his colleagues agreed — some reluctantly. Said 
the president of a college in Iowa: "I don't like it . . . but 
it may be inevitable." Another remarked: "On the ques- 






tion of federal aid, everybody seems to be running to the 
same side of the boat." 

More federal aid is almost certain to come. The ques- 
tion is, When? And in what form? 

Realism compels this answer: In the near future, the 
federal government is unlikely to provide substantial 
support for the operating expenses of the country's col- 
leges and universities. 

The war in Vietnam is one reason. Painful effects of 
war-prompted economies have already been felt on the 
campuses. The effective federal funding of research per 
faculty member is declining. Construction grants are be- 
coming scarcer. Fellowship programs either have been 
reduced or have merely held the line. 

Indeed, the changes in the flow of federal money to the 
campuses may be the major event that has brought higher 
education's financial problems to their present head. 

Would things be different in a peacetime economy? 
Many college and university administrators think so. 
They already are planning for the day when the Vietnam 
war ends and when, the thinking goes, huge sums of fed- 
eral money will be available for higher education. It is no 
secret that some government officials are operating on 
the same assumption and are designing new programs of 
support for higher education, to be put into effect when 
the war ends. 

Others are not so certain the postwar money flow is 
that inevitable. One of the doubters is Clark Kerr, former 
president of the University of California and a man with 
considerable first-hand knowledge of the relationship be- 
tween higher education and the federal government. Mr. 
Kerr is inclined to believe that the colleges and universi- 
ties will have to fight for their place on a national priority 
list that will be crammed with a number of other pressing 




c 



olleges and universities are tough. They have 
survived countless cataclysms and crises, and one 
way or another they will endure. 

— A college president 



problems: air and water pollution, civil rights, and the 
plight of the nation's cities, to name but a few. 

One thing seems clear: The pattern of federal aid must 
change dramatically, if it is to help solve the financial 
problems of U.S. higher education. Directly or indirectly, 
more federal dollars must be applied to meeting the in- 
creasing costs of operating the colleges and universities, 
even as the government continues its support of students, 
of building programs, and of research. 

IN searching for a way out of their financial difficul- 
ties, colleges and universities face the hazard that their 
individual interests may conflict. Some form of com- 
petition (since the institutions are many and the 
sources of dollars few) is inevitable and healthy. But one 
form of competition is potentially dangerous and de- 
structive and, in the view of impartial supporters of all 
institutions of higher education, must be avoided at all 
costs. 

This is a conflict between private and public colleges 
and universities. 

In simpler times, there was little cause for friction. 
Public institutions received their funds from the states. 
Private institutions received their funds from private 
sources. 

No longer. All along the line, and with increasing fre- 
quency, both types of institution are seeking both public 
and private support — often from the same sources: 

► The state treasuries: More and more private insti- 
tutions are suggesting that some form of state aid is not 
only necessary but appropriate. A number of states have 
already enacted programs of aid to students attending 
private institutions. Some 40 per cent of the state ap- 
propriation for higher education in Pennsylvania now 
goes to private institutions. 

► The private philanthropists: More and more public 
institutions are seeking gifts from individuals, founda- 
tions, and corporations, to supplement the funds they 
receive from the state. As noted earlier in this report, 
their efforts are meeting with growing success. 

► The federal government: Both public and private 
colleges and universities receive funds from Washington. 
But the different types of institution sometimes disagree 
on the fundamentals of distributing it. 

Should the government help pay the operating costs of 
colleges and universities by making grants directly to the 
institutions — perhaps through a formula based on enroll- 



ments? The heads of many public institutions are inclined 
to think so. The heads of many low-enrollment, high- 
tuition private institutions, by contrast, tend to favor pro- 
grams that operate indirectly — perhaps by giving enough 
money to the students themselves, to enable them to pay 
for an education at whatever institutions they might 
choose. 

Similarly, the strongest opposition to long-term, fed- 
erally underwritten student-loan plans — some envisioning 
a payback period extending over most of one's lifetime — ! 
comes from public institutions, while some private-college 
and university leaders find, in such plans, a hope that 
their institutions might be able to charge "full-cost" tui- 
tion rates without barring students whose families can't 
afford to pay. 

In such frictional situations, involving not only billions 
of dollars but also some very deep-seated convictions 
about the country's educational philosophy, the chances 
that destructive conflicts might develop are obviously 
great. If such conflicts were to grow, they could only sap 
the energies of all who engage in them. 

IF there is indeed a crisis building in American higher 
education, it is not solely a problem of meeting the 
minimum needs of our colleges and universities in 
the years ahead. Nor, for most, is it a question of 
survive or perish; "colleges and universities are tough," 
as one president put it; "they have survived countless 
cataclysms and crises, and one way or another they will ; 
endure." 

The real crisis will be finding the means of providing 
the quality, the innovation, the pioneering that the nation 
needs, if its system of higher education is to meet the 1 
demands of the morrow. 

Not only must America's colleges and universities 
serve millions more students in the years ahead; they 
must also equip these young people to live in a world that 
is changing with incredible swiftness and complexity. At 
the same time, they must carry on the basic research on 
which the nation's scientific and technological advance- 
ment rests. And they must be ever-ready to help meet the 
immediate and long-range needs of society ; ever-responsive 
to society's demands. 

At present, the questions outnumber the answers. 
► How can the United States make sure that its col- 
leges and universities not only will accomplish the mini- 
mum task but will, in the words of one corporate leader. 



N 



othing is more important than the critical and 
knowledgeable interest of our alumni. It cannot 
possibly be measured in merely financial terms. 

— A university president 



provide "an educational system adequate to enable us to 
live in the complex environment of this century?" 

► Do we really want to preserve the diversity of an 
educational system that has brought the country a 
strength unknown in any other time or any other place? 
And, if so, can we? 

► How can we provide every youth with as much 
education as he is qualified for? 

► Can a balance be achieved in the sources of higher 
education's support, so that public and private institutions 
can flourish side by side? 

► How can federal money best be channeled into our 
colleges and universities without jeopardizing their inde- 
pendence and without discouraging support either from 
the state legislatures or from private philanthropy? 

The answers will come painfully; there is no panacea. 
Quick solutions, fashioned in an atmosphere of crisis, are 
likely to compound the problem. The right answers will 
emerge only from greater understanding on the part of 
the country's citizens, from honest and candid discussion 
of the problems, and from the cooperation and support of 
all elements of society. 

The president of a state university in the Southwest told 
us: "Among state universities, nothing is more important 



than the growing critical and knowledgeable interest of 
our alumni. That interest leads to general support. It 
cannot possibly be measured in merely financial terms." 

A private college president said: "The greatest single 
source of improvement can come from a realization on 
the part of a broad segment of our population that higher 
education must have support. Not only will people have 
to give more, but more will have to g've." 

But do people understand? A special study by the 
Council for Financial Aid to Education found that: 

► 82 per cent of persons in managerial positions or 
the professions do not consider American business to be 
an important source of gift support for colleges and 
universities. 

► 59 per cent of persons with incomes of $10,000 or 
over do not think higher education has financial problems. 

► 52 per cent of college graduates apparently are not 
aware that their alma mater has financial problems. 

To America's colleges and universities, these are the 
most discouraging revelations of all. Unless the American 
people — especially the college and university alumni — 
can come alive to the reality of higher education's im- 
pending crisis, then the problems of today will be the 
disasters of tomorrow. 



The report on this and the preceding 15 
pages is the product of a cooperative en- 
deavor in which scores of schools, colleges, 
and universities are taking part. It was pre- 
pared under the direction of the group listed 
below, who form editorial projects for 
education, a non-profit organization associ- 
ated with the American Alumni Council. 



Naturally, in a report of such length and 
scope, not all statements necessarily reflect 
the views of all the persons involved, or of 
their institutions. Copyright © 1968 by Edi- 
torial Projects for Education, Inc. All rights 
reserved; no part may be reproduced without 
the express permission of the editors. Printed 
in U. S. A. 



DENTON BEAL 

Carnegie-Mellon University 

DAVID A. BURR 

The University of Oklahoma 

MARALYN O. GILLESPIE 

Swarthmore College 

CHARLES M. HELMKEN 

American Alumni Council 

GEORGE C. KELLER 

Columbia University 



JOHN I. MATTILL 

Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology 

KEN METZLER 

The University of Oregon 

RUSSELL OLIN 

The University of Colorado 

JOHN W. PATON 

Wesleyan University 

ROBERT M. RHODES 

The University of Pennsylvania 



STANLEY SAPLIN 

New York University 

VERNE A. STADTMAN 

The University of California 

FREDERIC A. STOTT 

Phillips Academy, Andover 

FRANK J. TATE 

The Ohio Slate University 

CHARLES E. WIDMAYER 

Dartmouth College 



DOROTHY F. WILLIAMS 

Simmons College 

RONALD A. WOLK 

The Carnegie Commission on 
Higher Education 

ELIZABETH BOND WOOD 

Sweet Briar College 

CHLSLIY WORTHINGTON 

Brown University 



CORBIN GWALTNEY 

Executive Editor 



JOHN A. CROWL 

Associate Editor 



WILLIAM A. MILLER. JR. 

Managing Editor 



A Diversity of Interests 



His name was Frederick Clement 
Stevens, but to a generation of Susque- 
hanna students he was known simply as 
"Stevie." The nickname did not imply 
a lack of respect. He was always ad- 
dressed as "Mr. Stevens," but somehow 
formality seemed foreign to his nature. 

"Stevie" taught at Susquehanna for 
35 years. When he died on Feb. 11 at 
the age of 65. he left behind a great 
many persons who felt diey were a little 
better for having known him. 

Music and sociology are not closely 
related fields, but he taught both of 
them. This was characteristic. He had a 
wide range of interests. As an under- 
graduate at the University of Minnesota. 
he majored in literature and arts. His 
masters degree from Columbia was in 
sociology and he studied music at the 
Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore and 
the Juilliard School in New York City. 

He received his master's degree in 
1932 and for more than 20 years continu- 
ed his education by studying somewhere 
almost every summer, spending five 
summers in Paris, four at Peabody, one 
at the Christian Choir School in Cham- 
bersburg. Pa., five at Columbia, and 
several at New York University. 

He was an enthusiastic photographer 
and had several shows at Susquehanna. 
He enjoyed fishing, canoeing and camp- 
ing. 

"He also was a connoisseur of good 
foods and liked to cook himself, and in 
his day he had an excellent singing 
voice," recalls Dr. Russell W. Gilbert, 
professor of German. 

Dr. Gilbert and Stevens both came 
to Susquehanna in 1930. They were 
single then, but both married within a 
year. 

Dr. Gilbert and the late Adelbert 
Hartung, professor of English, boarded 
at the home of a Mrs. Ulrich on Market 
St., near the Stanley Theatre. Stevens 
frequently visited them and the three 
would talk well into the night. 

"He would come in with a book he 
had just read," Dr. Gilbert recalls. "He 
would say: 'This is terrific' Then we 
would discuss it. He was a great read- 
er and his reading was in a wide variety 
of subjects." 

Stevens married Sara C. Brungart in 




Frederick C. Stevens 



June of 1931. The university registrar 
for a number of years, she died in 1957. 
Two years Inter Stevens married the 
former Anna Skirving Fitzgerald, now a 
part-time nurse at the campus Health 
Center. 

Born in Belfast, Me., on Nov. 23. 1902. 
Stevens was graduated from Central 
High School, St. Paul. Minn., and re- 
ceived his B.A. from the University of 
Minnesota in 1926. 

He came to Susquehanna as an in- 
structor in music, specializing in voice. 
He founded and directed the Motet 
Choir, famous for its cappella singing 
from 1935 to 1941, when it was dis- 
banded. In 1939 the choir placed sec- 
ond among some 200 college choral 
groups in a nationwide contest spon- 
sored by the Columbia Broadcasting 
System. CBS broadcasts carried the 
sound of the Motet Choir to many coun- 
tries. 

On April 30. 1966, some 40 members 
of the choir returned to the university 
to honor "Stevie." The reunion was ar- 
ranged by Carolyn Wahler, editor of 
the 1966 yearbook, which was dedicated 
to Stevens. Surprised and pleased, he 
led the group in several songs. 



Stevens left Susquehanna in 1942 to 
become head of the music department 
at Dickinson Junior College in Williams- 
port, Pa. (now Lycoming College), but 
he returned to S.U. in 1944 as assistant 
professor of sociology. He was subse- 
quently promoted to associate professor 
and then to professor last December. 

Although he devoted so much of his 
life to Susquehanna, Stevens also found 
time to be active in the community. A 
33rd degree Mason, he was a member 
of Lafayette Lodge 194 in Selinsgrove 
and for a number of years conducted 
Masonic choirs. 

In addition, he was a member of 
Trinity Lutheran Church, Selinsgrove; 
the American, Eastern and Pennsylvania 
Sociological Societies; Phi Mu Alpha, 
national honorary music society; and Pi 
Gamma Mu, national social science 
honor society. 

A campus memorial service for Stevens 
was held in the Chapel-Auditorium. Sus- 
quehanna President Gustave W. Weber 
and Chaplain Joseph B. Flotten were 
the participating clergymen and Dr. 
Gilbert delivered a brief eulogy. Re- 
ferring to Stevens' love of nature. Dr. 
Gilbert said: 

"Thinker that he was, these moments 
of relaxation in the outdoors must have 
lifted him into moods of meditation and 
closeness to his Creator. We know, for 
him the church was a \ital institution. 
His attendance at worship and his serv- 
ice as choir director in various churches 
bear witness, among other factors, to 
his faith." 

"What a diversity of interests," Dr. 
Gilbert continued. "Why list them? In 
spite of a world of sorrows, illness, strife, 
and struggle, life to him was essentially 
beautiful. And how often he said this 
and showed it, too! A zest for life, a 
delicate and telling sense of humor, a 
magnificent faith and boundless courage, 
a keen sense of justice and fairness, a 
straight - forward objectivity and frank- 
ness, genuine humility, a deep loyalty 
to Susquehanna without dulling his darts 
of sincere criticism — these and others 
are the virtues of Frederick Stevens in- 
scribed in our book of pleasant mem- 
ories." 



WINTER 1968 



31 




Backfield coach Ron Thomas was disappointed 
when 5-foot, 7-inch Lamar Knight decided last spring 
that he was going to quit football. Knight, then a 
freshman, looked dwarfed beside most of the other 
players, but the Crusader coaches thought he might 
be a starting defensive back in the fall. 

"He was a fearless tackier and he could stay with 
a receiver. He would have played, despite his size," 
Thomas declares. 

Knight, however, wanted to concentrate on wres- 
tling. The two seasons overlapped to some extent and 
his first love was wrestling. 

Charlie Kunes, assistant football and head wres- 
tling coach, has mixed feelings on the subject. 

"I think Lamar could have helped our defensive 
backfield, but it would have been a tremendous blow 
to the wrestling team if he had been injured in foot- 
ball," Kunes said. 

As The Alumnus went to press, Knight still was 
undefeated during his two years of dual meet wres- 
tling competition for Susquehanna. Competing in the 
137-pound class, he had a 7-0 record last winter as the 
Crusaders compiled a surprising 4-3 log during their 
first season of intercollegiate wrestling, and he was 
8-0 for the 1967-68 season. 

The sophomore finance major is the son of Dr. 
Lamar and Mrs. Mary Beth Richard Knight '37 of 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

Bill Bechtel, freshman 123-pounder from Selins- 
grove, also was undefeated in S.U.'s first eight meets. 
The only blemishes on his record were two draws. 
One of these was with Wally Goldberg of American 
University, 1967 Mason-Dixon Conference champion. 

Lane Kaley, sophomore 130-pounder from Summit, 
N.J., had a 4-0 record for Susquehanna and Heister 
Linn, junior 160-pounder from Elysburg, Pa., was 6-2. 
The Crusaders as a team were 4-3. 

e o o 

Records are made to be broken, but it may be a 
long time before anyone tops Rick Eppehimer's basket- 



ball scoring totals. Averaging about 32 points per 
game, the 6-2 senior from Pottstown, Pa., had a career 
total of 2,328 points as this was written. He still had 
seven games to play for Susquehanna. 

(Clark Mosier '63 held the previous S.U. career 
record of 1,801 points.) 

Eppehimer also was leading the Crusaders in re- 
bounding with an average of 12 per game and cer- 
tainly is a solid candidate for Little All - American 
honors. Apparently headed for his third straight scor- 
ing championship in the Middle Atlantic Conference's 
Northern College Division, he was named to the first 
team of the Associated Press All-Pennsylvania squad 
last season. 

Playing about .500 ball through most of the 
schedule, Susquehanna had shown a great deal of im- 
provement since the 1966-67 season, when the Crusa- 
ders won only two games in basketball. 

The players most responsible for this improve- 
ment were Ed Scherer, sophomore transfer student 
from Syosset, N.Y., and freshman guards Barry Boblick 
of Shamokin, Pa., and Jimmy Cotner of Watsontown, 
Pa. Scherer (6-3) was giving Eppehimer a lot of help 
on the boards, while Boblick and Cotner were averag- 
ing 15 and 11 points per game, respectively. 

Barry Llewellyn, 6-6 junior center from Shamokin, 
also was a steady performer, collecting about 12 
points and eight rebounds a game. He scored 38 in 
a one-point loss to Elizabethtown. 

000 

Don Wissinger '50, assistant professor of educa- 
tion, will help Jim Hazlett coach the baseball team 
this spring. Charles "Skeets" Reidell, senior mathema- 
tics major and former New York Yankee farmhand who 
has been assistant coach for the past three seasons, 
is busy with student teaching requirements this se- 
mester. Wissinger formerly coached football, basket- 
ball, and baseball at West York (Pa.) High School. 



32 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



The 67 ens . . . Where Are They Now? 



Lorraine Acker Brosious: English 
teacher, Williamstown ( X.J. ) High 
School. 

Anthony C. Adumopoulos: Graduate 
study, Suffolk University Law School, 
Boston, Mass. 

Donna Jean Ake: Elementary' music 
teacher. Lower Dauphin School District, 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

James A. Anderson: Graduate work in 
generalized-experimental psychology, C. 
VV. Post College of Long Island Univer- 
sity. He has a graduate assistantship. 

Client/ Anne Applcion: Teaching, six- 
th grade, Hatboro-Horsham School, 
Horshani, Pa. 

/. Robert Arthur: Accountant (train- 
ing program), Ernst and Ernst, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Nancy Lynn Baker: Personnel assist- 
ant. General Cable Corp. 

H. Richard Barley: Attending Luth- 
eran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, 
Pa. 

Charles S. Bender: Bank examiner 
trainee, Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corp., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Franklyn M. Bergonzi: Auditor, Main 
Lafrentz and Co., Harrisburg. Pa. Mar- 
ried former Polly Mayhoffer. 

Walter H. Bicdermann: Rate and tar- 
iff specialist, Communications Satellite 
Corp., Washington, D.C. Hopes to take 
graduate work at University of Marx- 
land for die MB. A. degree. 

V irginia Marie Binick: Attending 
Pratt Institute Graduate Library School, 
Brooklyn, N.Y., with the aid of a Penn- 
sylvania State Library Traineeship. 

F. Kent Bonney: Accounting depart- 
ment, Anchem Products, Inc., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Robert D. Bortz: Teaching social stud- 
ies, Upper Dublin Senior High School, 
Ft. Washington, Pa. Married former 
Beverly Walker x'67. 

John W. Bottiicr: Sales Department, 
Republic Steel Corp., Richmond, Va. 

Mary Louise Boyer: Elementary music 
teacher, Abington (Pa.) School District. 

Kathnjn E. Brejfitt: U.S. Army Special 
Services. Korea. 

Winifred V. Brennan: Music teacher, 
Wilhngboro (N.J.) Elementary Schools. 
Last summer she was named "Miss 
Wink" of Philadelphia and traveled 
with the "Winkmobile" handing out 
•free soft drink samples. 

Fayc Brenneman: Teaching music, 
Franklin School, East Orange, N.J. 



Janet L. Brian: Caseworker, Lancaster 
County (Pa.) Institutional District. 
Bureau of Children's Services. 

Barbara Broun Troutman: Teaching 
social studies, seventh and eighth grades, 
West Snyder Higli School, Beaver 
Springs, Pa. 

Bruce S. Broun: National Guard ac- 
tive duty training, stationed at Ft. Polk. 
La. Married former Janet McAfee '67. 

Edward E. Brown: Audit staff, Ly- 
brand, Ross Brothers and Montgomery, 
New York City. Anticipating service in 
the Naval Air Force. 

Susan Brumfield Ambacher: Medical 
research, Institute for Cancer Research, 
Fox Chase, Pa. 

Joan F. Buck: Elementary teacher, 
Souderton ( Pa. ) Area School District. 

Thomas W. Buttimer: Special educa- 
tion teacher, Delaware County ( Pa. ) 
School Board, Harvard Avenue, Swarth- 
more, Pa. Also working toward master's 
degree in special education at Temple 
University. Married former Susan /'///, 
'66. 

Jack R. Campbell: Teaching German 
and Spanish, Manheini Township High 
School, Lancaster, Pa. 

Sandra M. Chango: English teacher, 
Neshaminy Junior High School, Lang- 
hom, Pa. 

Virginia D. Christensen: Assistant 
buyer, Strawbridge and Clothier, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 

Mary Lee Clukey: Graduate study, 
American Academy of Dramatic Arts, 
New York City. Served as an apprentice 
at the Landing Playhouse, Shamokin 
Dam, Pa., during the summer of 1967. 

2/Lt. Allen Cohen: Attending Basic 
School, U.S. Marine Corps, Quantico, 
Va. 

Ellen Marie Comey: First grade teach- 
er, Coventry (R.I.) School System. Also 
pursuing graduate study in education 
at Rhode Island College. 

Anthony J. Costello: Graduate work, 
University of Arizona (Tucson), work- 
ing toward Ph.D. in biochemistry, with 
a teaching assistantship. Married for- 
mer Karen Rinte '67. 

Sandra Crowl Walker: Teaching 
world literature and Spanish, Dallas- 
town (Pa.) High School. Married to 
William R. Walker '65, who is serving 
in Vietnam. 

Cynthia D. Culp: Computer program- 
mer, Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance 
Co., Hartford, Conn. 



Bonnie J. Cutler: Programming, Bell 
Telephone Laboratories, Whippany, N.J. 

Michael ]. Cuzzolina Jr.: Staff ac- 
countant, Arthur Anderson and Co., Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. Married former Brenda 
Gise. 

Jeanne L. Damgaard: Second a r y 
English teacher, Gates - Chili Center 
Schools, Rochester, N.Y. 

Ens. Harry A. Deith: Was employed by 
Equitable Life Insurance Co., New Y'ork 
City. Reported to Naval Supply Corps 
School, Athens, Ga. in June, 1967. 

Thomas M. DcRose: Physicist, re- 
search development, U. S. Electronic 
Command, Fort Monmouth, N.J. 

Robert W. Dicker Jr.: Graduate 
school, Temple University College cf 
Education. Married the former Loretta 
M. Grisi x'69, who also is attending 
Temple University. 

Frederick L. Dudley: Industrial en- 
gineer. Republic Steel Corp., Youngs- 
town. Ohio. Also pursuing graduate 
study in connection with his work at 
Republic. Married. 

Billic Eby Kramer: Elementary vocal 
m u s i c teacher. Cherry Hill (N. J.) 
Schools. 

Marilyn A. Elfast: French teacher, 
Hauppauge Senior High School, Haup- 
pauge. Long Island. 

Carolyn Evans Much: Housewife. Mar- 
ried to Raymond Much 67. They have 
a son, Raymond Adam. 

S u s a n Fegely Hampel: Housewife. 
Married to Paul J. Hampel '69. 

Ethel E. Fellner: French teacher, 
Roton Junior High School, Norwalk, 

Sue E. Flook: Employment security 
interviewer for the State of Maryland, 
Hagerstown. 

Edward J. Forrest: Graduate work in 
psychology, C. W. Post College of Long 
Island University. 

Robert B. Fowler: Field supervisor 
of land development for Brookhaven 
Homes, Inc. — Crockett Mortgage Co. 
Married former Joanne Hiatt '67. 

Charles B. France: Management 
trainee, Sears, Roebuck and Co., St. 
Davids, Pa. 

Edna M. Fricker: Graduate study, 
Temple L T niversity, mathematics fellow- 
ship. 

John A. Frommeyer: U.S. Army, sta- 
tioned in Germany. 

William J. Fry III: Sales Department. 
United States Plywood, Camp Hill, Pa. 
Married former Karen Smith '66. 



WINTER 1968 



33 



Donna L. Garver: French teacher, 
Kennedy High School, WiUingboro, NJ. 

Ruth M. Gearhart: Physical educa- 
tion instructor, Schuylkill Haven (Pa.) 
School District. 

Barry I. Gehring: Building and con- 
struction business of his own. West Wild- 
wood, N.J., and Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Diannc E. Go o derham: Teacher, 
Spring-Ford High School. Royersford, 
Pa. 

2/Lt. Neil E. Goodrich: Attending 
Basic School, United States Marine 
Corps, Quantico, Va. Married. 

Parren A. Gottshall: Associate engi- 
neering technician, conversion tube activ- 
ity, R.C.A., Lancaster, Pa. Also graduate 
stud\ at Franklin and Marshall, solid 
state physics. 

V e r a Gottstein Riegel: Teacher, a 
school for mentally retarded children, 
Philadelphia. Married to Michael Riegel 
v'6.9, who is attending Temple Univer- 
sity. 

Penny Graham: Attending Katharine 
Gibbs School, Boston, Mass., secretarial 
course for college women. 

Christine Groth Murow: Case con- 
trol technician, Department of Public 
Welfare, Washington, D.C. Planning to 
teach music later. 

Karen II. Hardy: French teacher, 
Manheim Township Junior High and 
Neffsville (Pa.) Elementary School. 

Carol Ann Hasonich: Secondary vocal 
music teacher, Bethlehem (Pa.) School 
District. 

Diane Heller Nixon: Branch opera- 
tions trainee, Philadelphia National 
Bank. 

Paul O. Helvig: Graduate study. Uni- 
versity of Bridgeport, Conn. 

Richard B. Hess: Graduate work in 
economics of underdeveloped countries, 
University of Virginia. 

Joanne Hiatt Fowler: Housewife. Mar- 
ried to Robert B. Fouler '67. 

Diane Hillegass Pawloski: Housewife. 
Married to 2/Lt. Richard A. Pawloski 
'66, U.S. Marine Corps. 

Byrl W. Himelberger Jr.: Staff ac- 
countant, Price Waterhouse and Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Joan Hoffman Zerbe: Acting director, 
Snyder County Child Welfare Services, 
Middleburg, Pa. Married to Gary G. 
'/.■'fin- '65. 

Marilyn J. Holm: Claims representa- 
tive, Liberty Mutual Insurance Co., 
New York City. Also pursuing graduate 
studies in psychology at Adelphi Uni- 
versity, Garden City, N.Y. 

Charles A. Holmes: Graduate as- 
sistantship at B u c k n ell University, 



Studying for master's degree in chem- 
istry. Married. 

Linda I. Houdeshel: Teacher, Lower 
Dauphin Junior - Senior High School, 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

Richard R. Hough Jr.: Graduate study, 
Amos Tuck School of Business Admin- 
istration, Dartmouth College. Hanover, 
N.H. Married former Rosemary Robin- 
son '67. 

Ronald M. Jackson: Teaching Ger- 
man. North Scranton (Pa.) Junior High 
School. 

Robert M. Jones: Program represen- 
tative, Department of Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare, New York City. 

Robert T. Jones: Accounting trainee, 
United States Steel Corp., Irvin Works, 
Dravosburg, Pa. 

David Kaplan: Graduate study, Uni- 
versity of Oklahoma. 

Linda Kauffman Kirby: Teaching 
grades 10 and 11, Boyertown (Pa.) Area 
Senior High School. 

Barbara Ann Kaufmann: Third grade 
teacher. Smithtown ( N.Y. ) Elementary 
School. 

David H. Kehler: Bookkeeping teach- 
er and football coach, Tri-Valley High 
School, Hegins, Pa. 

John D. K'-im Jr.: Junior accountant, 
Price Waterhouse and Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa. Married former Andrea Schumann 
'67. 

John H. Kennedy III: Assistant de- 
partment manager, Strawbridge and 
Clothier, Philadelphia. Pa. 

Eileen E. Killian: Elementary vocal 
music teacher, Penn Manor Township 
Schools, Lancaster, Pa. 

Richard C. Kindig: Graduate study in 
bacteriology, Indiana University at 
Bloom ington. 

James W. Knepp Jr.: Dickinson School 
of Law, Carlisle, Pa. 

William D. Kramer: Staff accountant. 
Price Waterhouse and Co.. Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Edris S. Kruger: Teaching lltli grade' 
English, Souderton (Pa.) Area High 
School. 

Theodore N. K u b a c k i : Executive 
training program. Sears, Roebuck and 
Co., Hieksville, N.Y. 

Lance J. Larsen: Graduate study at 
Rutgers, The State University i f New 
Jersey, three-year fellowship in biology. 

Craig L. Lauson: Drew University 
Theological Seminary, Madison, N.J. 

D. Alan Lenig: Graduate study, Col- 
lege of Optometry, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Muxine E. Lentz: Social work. De- 
partment of Public Assistance. Lancaster, 
Pa. 



Donald C. Lindcnmuth: Graduate 
study in philosophy, Pennsylvania State 
University. 

William F. Liveng >od: Staff account- 
ant, Price Waterhouse and Co., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Judith Ann Lloyd: Teaching instru- 
mental and vocal music. Harford (Md.) 
County School District. 

Carol Logan Buell: Housewife. Mar- 
ried to Thomas R. Buell '66. 

Carole S. Lombard: Graduate study, 
University of Connecticut, social work. 
Hopes to do psychiatric social work. 

Douglas F. MacCuish: Hopes to go 
on the Professional Golfers Association 
tour. 

Ens. Raymond J. Mach: U.S. Navy. 
Married former Carolyn Evans '67. 

Marjorie M a c k Pearson : Teacher, 
Pennsbury Schools, Fallsington, Pa. 

Richard A. Main: Peace Corps, Addis 
Ababa, Ethiopia. 

Zolna F. Makar: Teaching German, 
Elmira (N.Y.) City School District. 

Jo Ann C. Mannello: Mathematics 
teacher, Roosevelt Junior High School, 
Mt. Carmel, Pa. 

Pvt. Thomas C. Maran: U. S. Army. 
Completed basic training in January and 
was assigned to Fort Jackson, S.C. 

Terry L. March: Staff Accountant, 
Price Waterhouse and Co., New York 
City. Married. 

Frank D. Marsh: Naval Officer Can- 
didate School, Newport, R.I. 

Peter C. Marshall: Graduate work, 
international marketing, Emory (Ga. ) 
University. 

Raymond M. Matty: Internal Rev- 
enue Service, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Christine V. Mayo: Elementary teach- 
er, Fauquier County, Va. 

Janet McAfee Broun: Office work, 
United Fund, Wichita, Kan. Married to 
Bruce S. Brown '67. 

Mary Jane McCrca: Teaching 11th 
grade journalism and 12th grade English 
literature, Carlisle (Pa.) Area Senior 
High School. 

Irene E. McHcnry: Staff technician. 
Bell Telephone Co.. Harrisburg. Pa. 

Clowie McLaughlin Reiff: Housewife 
and mother. 

Mary Ann McMullcn: Caseworker, 
Philadelphia County Board of Assistance, 
Pennsylvania Department of Public 
Welfare. 

Sind "Sally" C. Men iik: Latin teach- 
er, Central Regional High School, Bay- 
ville, N.J. 

Nicholas J. Migliaccio: Investment 
banking. C.C. Collings, Inc., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 



34 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Lesley D. Miller: Attending Electronic 
Computer Programming Institute, White- 
hall Mall, Fiillerton, Pa. 

Robert R. Miller Jr.: Choral and in- 
strumental teacher. Upper Dublin School 
District, Ft. Washington, Pa. Also 
pursuing graduate study at Temple Uni- 
versity. Married former Carolyn Wah- 
ler '67. 

Peter W. Minnick: Graduate study 
in special education. New York Univer- 
sity. 

Couldron P. Mitchell: Sales training 
program. Republic Steel, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Richard J. Moore: Graduate study, 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Wayne E. Morick: Graduate work, 
University of Maryland. 

Jeannctte G. Moyer: Training pro- 
gram for graduate students, Institutes 
for the Achievement of Human Poten- 
tial, City of Philadelphia. 

Barbara Ann Muiuly: Graduate work, 
American Musical and Dramatic Aca- 
demy. New York City. 

Cynthia Nixon Bonkcr: Caseworker, 
Snyder County Board of Assistance, Sel- 
insgrove. Married to Jon Boukcr '69. 

Patricia J. Norris: Teacher. York (Pa.) 
Suburban Junior High School. 

John A. Norton: Graduate study in 
public relations, American University, 
Washington, D.C. 

Richard W. Oelkers: Sales Depart- 
ment, Oxford Paper Co., New York 
City. Married former Patricia Simes. 

Nancy V. Orr: Employment Counse- 
lor, State Civil Service, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Thomas J. Palumho: Graduate work 
in elementary education, Temple Univer- 
sity. Also teaching at Arthur Elementary 
School, Philadelphia. 

Martjann Paylor Qrube: Teaching 
seventh and eighth grade reading, St. 
Thomas (Pa.) Junior High School, and 
working toward master's degree at 
Shippensburg State College. 

Lynn E. Versing: Graduate work in 
physical medicine, University of Penn- 
sylvania School of Allied Medical Pro- 
fessions. 

Stephen Petto Jr.: Fellowship in Ger- 
man, University of Connecticut. 

Nicholas O. Prusack II: Temple Uni- 
versity School of Dentistry, Philadelphia, 
Pa. He will specialize in orthodontics. 
Vicki E. Rcilly: Intake interviewer. 
Concentrated Employment Program, 
Philadelphia Employment Development 
Center. 

Rosemary Robinson Hough: Attended 
Tobe-Coburn School for Fashion Care- 
ers in Manhattan. Married to Richard 
Hough '67. 

WINTER 1968 



Richard G. Roesler Jr.: Dreslin and 
Co., certified public accountants, Phila- 
delphia. Married former Kathleen Hois- 
ington. 

Karen Rowe Costello: Graduate study, 
University of Arizona, Tucson. 

Barbara Rozanski Hurst: Sales cor- 
respondent, Carpenter Steel Co.. Read- 
ing, Pa. 

Carolyn A. Ruocco: Reading teacher, 
Northampton ( Pa. ) Junior High School. 

Thomas A. Rutishauser Jr.: Personnel 
Department, Forgflo Corp., Sunbury, Pa. 

Kenneth R. Sausman Jr.: Graduate 
study, Miami University of Ohio, as- 
sistantship in mathematics. 

Christine Schlichting McKay. Con- 
necticut College, graduate work in psy- 
chology with an assistantship for work- 
in the special senses branch, U.S. Navy 
Medical Research Laboratory. 

Janet Schumacher Reynolds: Employ- 
ed by International Business Machines 
Corp. Married to Douglas Reynolds x'65. 

Andrea Schumann Keim: Office serv- 
ices supervisor, American Can Co., New 
York City. Married to John Keim '67. 

Ens. Gary R. Seifert: U.S.S. Cape, 
Long Beach, Calif. 

Marion L. Shatto: Teaching English, 
Big Spring High School. Newville, Pa. 

Margaret A. Shields: Elementary vocal 
music teacher, Boyertown ( Pa. ) Area 
Schools. 

Elizabeth S. Shintay: Graduate work, 
Michigan State University, East Lans- 
ing, Mich. 

Eugene II Shotsberger: Accountant, 
Haskins and Sells. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Kathleen E. Simmers: Second grade 
teacher, Boyertown (Pa.) Area School 
District. 

Diane P. Simmons: Caseworker, Penn- 
sylvania Department of Public Assis- 
tance, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Carole L. Sloan: Junior auditor. Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Marijane Snyder: Graduate study, 
Temple University. Working toward 
master's degree in education. 

Pfc. Ray E. Snyder: U.S. Army, Fitz- 
simmons General Hospital, Denver, Colo. 

Robert C. Snyder: Graduate study, 
Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia. 

Jane E. Speiser: English teacher, 
Leonard R. Parks School, Cedar Grove, 
N.J. 

Alberta Spoerer Dean: Employment 
counselor, Kentucky State Employment 
Agency, Youth Opportunity Center, 
Louisville. 

Gail L. Spory: Graduate fellowship, 
Colgate University, Hamilton, N.Y. 

John J. Stankiewicz: Science teacher 
and assistant track coach, Lansdowne- 



35 



Aldan High School, Lansdowne, Pa. 
Also working toward master's degree at 
Temple University, 

Bonnie Stewart Frommeyer: With her 
husband, John '67, who is serving with 
the U.S. Army in Germany. 

Kristen A. Stine: Advertising-Produc- 
tion Traffic Dept., N.W. Ayer and Son, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

William P. Surplus: Transportation 
Division, Republic Steel Corp., Youngs- 
town, Ohio. Married the former Claudia 
Hazlett. 

Susan L. Swanson: Caseworker, Ber- 
gen County Welfare Board, Hackensack, 
N.J. 

Barry L. Tollman: U.S. Army. Com- 
pleted basic training at Ft. Benning, Ga.. 
in December. 

Linda Thomas Helvig: English teach- 
er, East Lyme (Conn.) High School. 

Grace Toothaker DeLong: Music 
supervisor, Millville (Pa.) Elementary 
Schools. 

Roger G. VanDeroef: Laboratory tech- 
nician, Rutgers, The State University of 
New Jersey. 

George D. Yirchick: Teaching junior 
high class in special education, Selins- 
grove Area Joint Schools. Also pursuing 
graduate study in special education at 

oomsburg State College. 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

1968 

Spring Sports Schedules 

BASEBALL 

A 6 King's (2) H 

A 9 Dickinson A 

A 17 Scranton A 

A 18 Philadelphia Textile H 

A 20 M filers ville (2) H 

A 23 Albright A 

A 24 Lycoming H 

A 27 Delaware Valley (2) H 

M 1 Juniata A 

M 2 Elizabethtown A 

M 4 Ithaca (2) H 

M 6 Bueknell H 

M 10 Wagner A 

M II Upsala (2) A 

M 14 Wilkes A 

M 15 Juniata H 

M IS Hart wick (2) A 

GOLF 

A 2 King's H 

A 8 Gettysburg A 

A 17 Scranton H 

A 19 Bloomsburg A 

A 22 Wilkes H 

A 26 Delaware Valley 

A 30 Franklin & Marshall H 

M 3 Elizabethtown A 

M 6 M.A.C. Tournament A 

M 10 Bueknell H 

M 16 Lycoming & Juniata A 



Karen D. Vultee: Teaching vocal 
music. Long Valley (N.J.) Elementary 
Schools. 

James B. Wagner Jr.: Graduate assist- 
ant, John Carroll University Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Carolyn Wchler Miller: Systems en- 
gineering trainee, International Business 
Machines Corp., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Janet Walling Scovell: With her hus- 
band, Ensign Robert J. '65, who is serv- 
ing with the U.S. Navy in Barbados, 
British West Indies. 

Constance A. W alter: Becreation 
specialist, Seoul, Korea. 

Dwight F. Weeks: Auditing Depart- 
ment, Main Lafrentz and Co., New York 
City. 

Paula Weiss Traher: Teaching English 
and drama, West Pittston (Pa.) Senior 
High School. 

Susan Welty Ferrari: Teaching music, 
Hershey (Pa.) Junior High School. 

William H. Wiest: Attending Dickin- 
son School of Law, Carlisle, Pa. 

Paul P. Wild: Staff accountant, Ernst 
and Ernst, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Jean Wilkinson Gagne: Teaching in 
the New Britain ( Conn. ) School District. 

John P. Williams Jr.: Office manager 
trainee, John Hancock, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ronald W. Williams: Marketing re- 
search, Philadelphia Electric Co. 





Crusader 




TENNIS 




A 4 


Elizabethtown 


A 


A 6 


Albright 


A 


A 9 


Lycoming 


A 


A 18 


Bloomsburg 


A 


A 20 


Hartwick 


H 


A 23 


Bucknell 


H 


A 27 


Wilkes 


H 


M 1 


Scranton 


A 


M 4 


M.A.C. Tournament 


A 


M 6 


Juniata 


H 


M 11 


Delaware Valley 


A 


M 14 


MillcrsN ilk- 


H 


M 16 


King's 

TRACK 


H 


A 6 


( !ett) sburg 


H 


A 9 


Delaware Valley 


H 


A 16 


Western Maryland 


A 


A 20 


Lycoming 


A 


A 24 


Hartwick 


H 


A 27 


Millersville 


H 


A 30 


Juniata 


A 


M 4 


Bucknell 


A 


M 7 


Upsala & Kutztown 


II 


M 10-11 


M.A.C. Championships 


A 


Spring Sports 



Carol Ann Winter: History teacher, 
grades 10 and 11, Loyalssck Township 
High School, Williamsport, Pa. 

Robert A. Wisegarver: Teaching 
Spanish and English, Bedford (Pa.) 
Area High School. 

Richard Scott Wolf: Chemist, Arm- 
strong Cork Co., Lancaster, Pa., in the 
Botogravure a n d Consumer Products 
Laboratory. 

Vaughn A. Wolf: Graduate work, 
Pennsylvania State University. Married 
to die former Sandra Dietz. 

Eileen Worrell: Caseworker, Family 
and Children's Service, Lebanon, Pa. 

William H. Wrege: Graduate studies 
in mathematics, Temple University. 

Airman Ronald Yevitz: Personnel 
specialist, U.S. Air Force, Strategic Air 
Command, McCoy Air Force Base, Fla. 
Married to die former Linda Truitt. 

William L. Yinpling: Attending Tem- 
ple University School of Medicine. 

Brenda J. Yost: Teaching English to 
sophomore academic students and junior 
business groups, Selinsgrove Area Joint 
High School. 

Marilyn H. Zannie: Graduate study 
in mathematics, Miami University, Ox- 
for, Ohio, assistantship. 

Donna L. Zeiders: Teaching elemen- 
tary music, Kutztown ( Pa. ) Area School 
District. 

Paillette M. Zupko: Teaching a begin- 
ning elementary string program in the 
Boyertown ( Pa. ) Area School District. 

Kathryn L. Z wicker: Caseworker, 
State of Connecticut Welfare Depart- 
ment, Norwich. 

x67 

Reynold L. Badman: Attending Uni- 
versity of Southern California, Los 
Angeles. 

Lucy Brauiii Feiek: Housewife, Dev- 
on, Pa. 

Paula Dietrich Cina: Graduate of the 
Katharine Gibbs School. Secretary, Na- 
tional Council of Churches, New York 
City. 

Mary Drake Franco: Also attended 
William Woods College, Fulton, Mo. 
Housewife. 

Bent Folk; Attending University of 
Aarhus, Denmark, majoring in theology. 

Barbara Codman Trostle: Also attend- 
ed the University of Maryland. House- 
wife, Chadford, Pa. Married to Richard 
S. Trostle x'67. 

Charles L. Greenhagen: Lutheran Col- 
lege of the Bible and Liberal Arts, 
Teaneck. N.J.. preparing for seminary 
study. 

Arthur O. Harris: Will receive the 
U.S. degree in business administration 
from Sioux Falls (S.D.) College in May. 



36 



Attending Univer- 

Assistant librarian. 

High School. Also 

degree at Rutgers. 

Attending Univer- 



Jennifer Hawley Hamme: Also at- 
tended Ridgewood Secretarial School. 
Housewife, York, Pa. 

Carol Heding Munson: Home Eco- 
nomics teacher, grades 7-12, Bernards 
(N.J.) High School. Graduate of Mont- 
clair (N.J.) State College. 

David B. Hov's: Accountant, Potomac 
Edison Co., Hagerstown, Md. 

Stephanie Herpst Cottererl: House- 
wife, Hackettstown, N.J. 

Lynda Lutz Mather: Employed as 
veterinary assistant, Morristown, N.J. 

Glenn E. Malwitz: 
sity of Baltimore. 

Elza V. MeGordy: 
New Milford (N.J.) 
studying for M.L.S. 

Janice S. Meldola: 
sity of Miami, Fla. 

Susan Metz Horn: Housewife. Mar- 
ried to Lt. John C. Horn Jr. '64. 

Jean A. Nevins: Studying for master's 
degree in social work, University of Con- 
necticut. 

Soonjung Park: Attending New York 
University. 

Mary Ann Pfaff: Graduate of Kath- 
arine Gibbs School. 

Richard M. Politi: Attending Youngs- 
town (Ohio) University. 

Michael A. Porter: Agent, Prudential 
Insurance Co. of America, Wilmington, 
Del. Married. 

Janet Purvis Stiegler: Married to Gary 
N. Stiegler '68. They are the parents 
of a one-year-old daughter, Cherry Lee. 

Michael Rein: U.S. Air Force. Mar- 
ried to the former Millicent Heuser. 

Robert E. Soger: U.S. Navy. Married 
to the former Patricia Light. 

Elaine Simington Strehle: Also attend- 
ed Green Mountain College. Complet- 
ed the requirements last June for regist- 
ered nurse, Mohawk Valley Community 
College. 

2/Lt. David T. T. Smith: Serving widi 
the 546th Transportation Company, Fort 
Bragg, N.C. 

Louise Spitzner Rcilly: Junior in ele- 
mentary education. West Chester State 
College. Married. 

W. Gamer Traher Jr.: Standard 
Equipment Co., Exeter, Pa. Married 
former Paula Weiss '67. 

A. Michael Velthaus: Cooper Union 
School of Architecture, New York City. 

Beverly Walker Bortz: Graduate of 
Katharine Gibbs School. Executive sec- 
retary for a Philadelphia banking firm. 

Arthur II. Walkley IV: Assistant con- 
trait administrator, American Avitron, 
Inc.. Rye, N.Y. Served with U.S. Marine 
Corps in Southern Europe. 

SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Susquehannans 
On Parade 



'99 

The Rev. Walter A. Wolgemuth 
celebrated the 65th anniversary of his 
ordination last May. At 90 he is the 
oldest living pastor in the Iowa Synod 
of the Lutheran Church in America. 

'13 

The Rev. Ray L. Lubold recently 
served as guest pastor for the East Kish- 
acoquillas Lutheran Parish, consisting of 
St. John's Church in Siglerville, Pa. and 
St. Paul's Church in Milroy, Pa. He 
served this parish as its regular pastor 
from 1916 to 1918. 

'15 

Ralph Witmer was re-elected presi- 
dent of the Snyder County Trust Com- 
pany, Selinsgrove. Among the other of- 
ficers are L. Arthur Gingrich x25, vice 
president; W. David Gross '47, treas- 
urer; and Marvin \Y. Maneval '47. trust 
officer. 

'17 

The Rev. Earl Mohney and his wife 
celebrated their 50th wedding annivers- 
ary last June. They live in Allegan, 
Mich. 

'19 

The Rev. Dr. WiUard D. Allheck and 
his wife visited with their daughter and 
family in Japan last summer, returning 
to the United States at the end of Oc- 
tober. 

'21 

The Rev. Dr. Russell Steininger re- 
tired January 31 from the active Luth- 
eran ministry. He had served for the 
past 18 years as pastor of Grace Lutheran 
in Butler, Pa. Dr. Steininger is married 
to the former Ruth Bond '24. 

'22 

Dr. C. Howard Roth fuss of Wood- 
bridge, N.J., and his brother, Bryan '23, 
of Williamsport, Pa., returned to the 
United States last October after two 
months of hunting in Mozambique and 
the Union of South Africa. The oppor- 
tunity for their trip came when Dr. 



Rodifuss was commissioned by the Na- 
ture Museum of York County, S.C. to 
collect a large variety of animals in 
Africa. They bagged 52 species of 
animals and 67 species of birds 

'23 

Marlyn R. FetteroM 

45th Reunion Chairman 
1636 Sunshine Ave. 
Johnstown, Pa. 15901 

The Rev. Joshua C. Brcuningcr, re- 
tired Lutheran minister and chaplain, is 
the author of several articles in a book 
entitled Tableland Trails. A copy of 
the book was presented to the Susque- 
hanna Library by Dr. WiUard D. All- 
beck '19. 

'27 

Dr. Charles E. Chaffee, former super- 
intendent of schools in Bethlehem, Pa., 
is now an educational consultant for re- 
search and development. "Charles E. 
Chaffee Associates" serve public school 
districts, community colleges, area tech- 
nical schools, and architects. They 
specialize in preparing long range de- 
velopmental plans to determine the 
school facilities needed. 

'28 

The Rev. Dr. Harold E. Ditzler 

40th Reunion Chairman 
230 Valley Forge Rd. 
Lansdale, Pa. 19446 

'29 

A scholarship fund in memory of the 
late Li/Iu Kimball Kendall was establish- 
ed at Susquehanna recently by her hus- 
band, Ralph M. Kendall of Anna Maria. 
Fla. The scholarship is to be used to 
assist students from the Dalmatia (Pa.) 
area where Mrs. Kendall last taught. 

x'32 

/. Robert Reeder has been appointed 
to the staff of die Pennsylvania Bankers 
Association as director of banking serv- 
ices. He had been a vice president of 
the Northern Central Bank and Trust 
Company, Williamsport, Pa. 



'33 

Josephine Hoy Lamb 

35th Reunion Chairman 
21 Kensington Terrace 
Maplewood, N.J. 07040 

Hon '35 

Charles A. Nicely of Watsontown, Pa. 
was honored last fall with a testimonial 
dinner by the Watsontown Masonic 
Lodge No. 401. He received the 33rd 
degree of Free Masonry in September at 
Pittsburgh. 

'37 

The Rev. Dr. Clarence C. Otto is die 
new pastor of St. John's Lutheran 
Churches in Mt. Pleasant Mills and 
Richfield, Pa. His previous charge had 
been at Duncansville. Pa., near Altoona. 

'38 

Robert A. Boyer 

30th Reunion Chairman 
20 Beverly Dr. 
AJlentown, Pa. 18104 

'40 

The Rev. John Genzel and fixe jazz 
musicians have recorded a worship 
service in jazz entitled "O Sing to the 
Lord a New Song." The recording is 
to be released on die Fortress Records 
label of the Lutheran Church in Amer- 
ica's Board of Publication. Mr. Genzel 
is the LCA pastor of the New York jazz 
community. 

Harold E. Shaffer, associate professor, 
Division of Social Sciences, West Chester 
State College, is on sabbatical leave 
during the spring semester. He is del- 
ing research on teacher education which 
will take him on trips to die South and 
to the West Coast. He is chairman of 
the Club Activities Committee of the 
S.U. Alumni Association. 

'41 

Dr. Glenn L. Musser, who had served 
for the past five years as president of 
HRB-Singer, Inc., State College, Pa., is 
now assistant director for limited war- 
fare, Technical Analysis and Advisory 
Group, in the Office of die Chief of 
Naval Operations, Washington, D. C. 



WINTER 1968 



37 



His new address is 457 Argyle Dr., Alex- 
andria, Va. 22305. 

'42 

Paul A. Lantz was honored last I, ill 
for Iris 25 years as a Civil Service em- 
ployee. He is head of the antenna sec- 
tion at the Goddard Space Flight Cen- 
ter, Greenbelt, Md. In this capacity, he 
is responsible for the design and develop- 
ment of earth-based antennas used in 
acquiring data from satellites and space- 
craft. 

'43 

John V. Walsh 

25th Reunion Chairman 
5017 Flanders Ave. 
Kensington, Md. 20795 

'48 

Robert F. Wohlsen 

20th Reunion Chairman 

145 Herman Blvd. 

Franklin Square, N.Y. 11010 

The Rev. David E. Bombay has ac- 
cepted a call to serve as pastor of St. 
Paul's and Lebanon Lutheran Churches 
at DuBois, Pa. He and his wife, the 
former Betty Smith '48, were formerly 
at Everett, Pa. 

Roy E. Stdhl, professor of music at 
Concordia College, presented the ded- 
icatory recital on the new pipe organ in 
the Lutheran Church of the Good Shep- 
herd, Moorhead, Minn. 

'51 

W. Donald Fisher, president of Gen- 
eral Equipment Rentals, Inc., Selins- 
grove, was elected to the board of direc- 
tors of the National Truck Leasing Sys- 
tem at the annual meeting in Chicago. 

Martini Albert Putnam is teaching 
sixth grade at the American Community 
School in Beirut, Lebanon. She has been 
in the Middle East for 11 years. Her 
address: Mrs. Rhea H. Putnam, Trans- 
Arabian Pipeline Co., Box 1348, Beirut, 
Lebanon. 

x'51 

Dr. Richard E. Acciavetti was pro- 
moted to professor of education at Seton 
Hall University. A member of the fac- 
ulty since 1962, he is direetor of the 
Graduate Program in Rehabilitation 
Counselor Education. 

'53 

David Beimel I 

15th Reunion Chairman 

524 Arch St. 

Montoursville, Pa. 17754 

John W. Mayer is a district scout ex- 
ecutive with the Robert Treat Council, 
Boy Scouts of America, in Newark, N.J. 
He and his wife and two children are 
living in Old Bridge, N.J. 




SU vignette 



PETER BEIGER '64 is a young 
man who seems to be going places in 
a hurry. Competing against several 
hundred other actors, he won the role 
of Peter VanDaan in the 90-minute 
television version of "The Diary of 
Anne Frank." Shown by ABC last fall, 
the production had a cast which in- 
cluded s u c h internationally famous 
stars as Lilli Palmer, Max Von Sydow, 
Theodore Bikel, Viveca Lindfors and 
Donald Pleasence. 

Married to the former Eileen Mc- 
Cormick of Sunbury, Pa., Beiger 
• worked as a reporter for the Sunbury 
Daily Item while waiting for his next 
theatrical opportunity. It came when 
Terry Kiser left the long-running off-Broadway drama "Fortune and Men's 
Eyes." Kiser had played the lead role of Smitty. Beiger again found 
himself in competition with several hundred aspirants. He won the part, 
however, and remained with the show when it closed in New York and 
tiien went on tour in Canada. Presented in Toronto and Montreal, it 
returned to Toronto for a six-week extension and then moved on to Cali- 
fornia. Plans also have been made for a trip to London with the show. 
Although only in his mid-20s, Beiger has a long background in 
drama. A native of New Hope, Pa., he appeared at the Bucks County 
Playhouse and starred in numerous roles for the Susquehanna University 
Players. He credits Dr. Bruce L. Nary, professor of speech and director 
of the S.U. Players, with helping him develop his "first real concept of the 
theatre." Beiger adds: "He made it a real commitment. I first learned 
how to be a professional with Dr. Nary." 

Pictured here with Carol Bollinger Joyce '64 in the S.U. Players' 
1963 production of "Liliom," Beiger taught school for a year before he 
decided to become a professional actor. He played several major roles 
with a repertory company in Morristown, N.J., and then went to New 
York to "make the rounds." He and his wife make their home at 310 S. 
Fourth St., Sunbury. They have a daughter, Michele, aged four. 



Robert A. Mesler has been promoted 
to the rank of commander in the U.S. 
Navy. He is currently serving as execu- 
tive officer of the U.S.S. Radford, which 
is operating in the Western Pacific. He 
has recently been awarded two medals, 
one "1 which was the Navy Commenda- 



tion Medal. His wife is the former 
Marjorie Way '53; they have three sons. 

'54 

William C. Church has been appoint- 
ed eastern regional sales manager for 
the Baby Products Division of Chicopee 
Mills, Inc. He and his wife, the former 



38 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Helen Spaeth x'55, and their three chil- 
dren live in Verona, N.J. 

Wallace E. Gordon has been chosen 
director of a newly formed musical or- 
ganization (a mixed chorus) from the 
Scranton area known as the Key-Notes. 

Duanc Mitchell is teaching at Persh- 
ing High School in Detriot and studying 
for his master's degree at Wayne State 
University. He formerly taught in Ad- 
dis Ababa, Ethiopia, and served with 
the Agency for International Develop- 
ment in Korea and Africa. In 1964 he 
married the former Loreice E. Lufty, 
then a foreign service officer with the 
U.S. Embassy at Freetown, Sierra Leone. 
They now live at 28219 Joan St., St. 
Clair Shores, Mich. 48081. 

James "Mike" Rising is now an in- 
structor in the building trades division 
of Williamsport Area Community Col- 
lege. He had formerly been employed 
as a construction estimator for Stan 
Seiple, Inc. of Sunbury. 

'55 

Donald E. Heilman is a cost account- 
ant at the Brooklyn plant of the Amer- 
ican Can Co. He and his wife, the 
former Joan Williams x'5S, and their 
daughter live in East Brunswick, N.J. 

Dr. D. Richard Walk has retired 
from the Navy and is a staff psychiatrist 
with the Department of Youth Author- 
ity, Preston School of Industry, in Cali- 
fornia. His address is R.D. 1, Box 43, 
lone, Calif. 95640. 

'56 

The Rev. John D. Yeich is a chaplain 
with the First Marine Division in Viet- 
nam. He will return to the Unit e d 
States in July. His wife, the former 
Janet Qerner, and their three children 
are living in Bethesda, Md. 

'58 

James W. White 

10th Reunion Chairman 

918 E. Walnut St. 

Lancaster, Pa. 17602 

Stanley E. DeCamp has received a 
Hoh Award from the Men of Mt. Airy, 
a supporting organization of laymen for 
the Lutheran Seminary at Philadelphia. 
The award, given for academic excel- 
lence during the previous school year, 
includes a $500 stipend. 

Richard L. Purnell coached his Shik- 
ellamy High School ( Sunbury-Northum- 
berland) football team to its third suc- 
cessive undefeated season and Southern 
Division championship in the Eastern 
Pennsylvania Football Conference. In 
a play-off for the conference title, his 
Braves tied Pirtston Area High School, 
the Northern Division champion, 0-0. 



'59 

Peter raid Pace is a sales representa- 
tive with the Burroughs Corp., working 
with Charles A. Morris '49. Pace and 
his wife, the former Betsy Walker, have 
moved to 232 Greenlane Dr., Camp 
Hill, Pa. 17011. They have two children. 

Mary Overly Feraro is teaching Latin 
and is a dramatics coach at Donegal 
High Shool in Mt. Joy, Pa. 

'60 

James R. Middlestoorth has been 
transferred to the Charlotte, N.C., of- 
fice of Lybrand, Ross Brothers, and 
Montgomery, where he is manager in 
charge of tax services. His wife is the 
former Jean Ewald '62. 

'61 

Dr. M. Donald Cave is teaching and 
doing research at the University of Pitts- 
burgh Medical Center. He and his wife 
are the parents of a son and live at 
719 Cottonwood Dr., Monroeville, Pa. 
15146. 

Paul A. Martin has been appointed 
professor of music at Edinboro ( Pa. ) 
State College. He is now a graduate 
teaching assistant at Temple University, 
where he is completing his course work 
for the doctor of musical arts degree in 
composition. He will present a recital 
of original works at Temple this spring. 
Martin is married to the former Lillian 
Holcombe '60. 

'62 

Dorothy M. Anderson is assistant 
dean of women at Susquehanna. She 
was appointed to the newly created 
position last September. 

Maria Wernikowski MacFarlan and 
her husband are back in the United 
States, living at 50 B. Byrne Court. 
Wayne, N.J. 07470. Mr. MacFarlan 
has resumed his law practice after a 
two-year tour of duty in the Army. He 
was stationed in Germany. 

'63 

H. Nathan Ward 

5th Reunion Chairman 
546 Hummel Avenue 
Lemoyne, Pa. 17043 

'64 

Oliver Andes, a seaman in the U.S. 
Navy, is serving aboard the aircraft car- 
rier Wasp in the Atlantic. 

Dorothy L. Canfield Marshall is teach- 
ing English at Catonsville ( Md. ) Jun- 
ior High School. Her husband, Russell, 
is an accountant for Graf, Hesse & Hart- 
love, certified public accountants in 
Baltimore. Their address is 107-E Rock 
Glen Rd., Baltimore 21229. 

Joseph A. "Jay" Snyder has been 



awarded a George Washington Honor 
Medal Award by the Valley Forge Free- 
doms Foundation for a letter he wrote 
to Sally DeMott while he was serving 
in Vietnam. The letter was published 
in the student newspaper at Bucknell 
University under the title "From a Bar- 
ren Mountain Top in Vietnam, GI's 
Need Your Prayers and Support." Miss 
DeMott, who attended Bucknell, is the 
daughter of Dr. Howard E. DeMott. 
professor of biology at Susquehanna. 
Snyder, now employed on the personnel 
staff of Pennsylvania Governor Raymond 
P. Shafer, received the award from Gov. 
Shafer in December. 

Capt. Michael C. Voiles returned to 
the states hist fall after serving with the 
Marine Corps for 13 months in DaNang 
and the Demilitarized Zone. He is at 
Camp Pendleton, Calif. 92055. 

'65 

Charles W. Borgerding is a personnel 
manager for M & T, a contract engineer- 
ing concern in Philadelphia. His wife. 
the former Susan Duerr, is teaching 
music at the Marple Newtown Junior 
High School in Newtown Square, Pa. 
Their new address is 52-6 Revere Rd., 
Drexel Hill, Pa. 19026. 

Ann E. K. Pavelko is working at the 
University of Hawaii on a research eval- 
uation project. Her address is 1784 Ala 
Moana Blvd., Honolulu. Hawaii 96815. 

Robert J. Reed Jr. is a management 
trainee with the J. C. Penney Co. at 
the South Shore Mall, Sunrise Highway, 
Bay Shore, N.Y. 11706. 

Steven L. Seitz is serving a one-year 
clinical training internship for the Na- 
tional Council of Churches at Vial, 
Colorado, a ski resort area where he 
ministers to vacationers. His wife, the 
former Carole Knox '62, is teaching 
business education at a local high school. 
When Steve's internship is completed, 
they will return to Pennsylvania and 
Steve will resume his studies at the 
Gettysburg Seminary. Carole will re- 
turn to her graduate studies at Ship- 
pensburg State College. 

Robert N. Watts Jr. is teaching at 
Ohio University and his wife, the for- 
mer Janet Clark, is a junior high school 
teacher at Union Furnace, Ohio. Their 
address is 146 E. Columbus St., Nelson- 
ville, Ohio 45764. 

x'65 

Jerold C. Burch, who completed a 
tour of Vietnam duty in January, has 
returned to the United States to con- 
tinue his four-year enlistment as a 
Naval hospital corpsman. 

David W. Generaux is attending the 
University of Delaware. He spent two 



WINTER 1968 



39 



years in the Army, traveling to the Mid- 
dle East, Europe and Africa with the 
Army Map Service. 

'66 

Second Lt. Robert J. Campbell is 
serving as an intelligence officer in Ko- 
rea. He is stationed close to the De- 
militarized Zone that separates the Re- 
public of South Korea from Communist 
North Korea. 

Margaret L. K a u f m a n is teaclung 
English at James Hart Junior High 
School, Homewood, 111., and studying 
for a master's degree in humanities at 
the University of Chicago. 

Ellen K. Maddock is teaching in the 
Nazareth (Pa.) Area School District. 

John R. May was commissioned as a 
second lieutenant in the Army upon 
graduation from the Transportation Of- 
ficer Candidate School, Ft. Eustis, Va. 

Michael P. Ranch is stationed with 
the 509 Radio Regiment in Vietnam 
and will be there until July. His wife, 
the former Dorothy Wiesman, is teach- 
ing German in the Fayetteville (N.C. ) 
School System. 



i i 



I Do 



> ? 





SUSQUEHANNA 






1967 






Fall Sports Results 




su 


CROSS COUNTRY 


Opp 


29 


Lock Haven 


26 


17 


Rloomsburg 


45 


26 


Dickinson 


29 


15 


Albright 


48 


30 


Gettysburg 


25 


27 


Elizabethtown 


28 


17 


Scranton 


44 


16 


King's 


46 


34 


Hartwiek 


25 


18 


Millers ville 


41 


20 


Delaware Valley 


37 


27 


Juniata 

Won 9 Lost 3 

FOOTBALL 


28 





Waynesburg 


60 





Wittenberg 


63 


19 


Bloomsburg 


34 


15 


Ithaca 


43 





Upsala 


42 


27 


Frederick 


7 


20 


Juniata 


45 





Wagner 


20 





Findlay 

Won 1 Lost 8 

SOCCER 


47 


2 


Dickinson 


1 


1 


Elizabethtown 


2 





Hartwiek 


6 


I 


Drew 


2 





Millers ville 





2 


Wagner 


1 


6 


Lycoming 





4 


Upsala 





1 


St. Bonaventure 








BuckneU 


3 





Philadelphia Textile 


3 





Wilkes 
Won 5 Lost 6 Tied 1 


1 



SHEFFLER-WOLCOTT 
Gaye Ally son Wolcott '65 to M. 

Andrew Sheffler, April 22, 1967, Grace 
Lutheran Church, Highland Park, Har- 
risburg, Pa. Gaye is an administrative 
assistant in student affairs at the Hershey 
Medical Center, Pennsylvania State 
University. Her husband is a graduate 
of Allegheny College and is working in 
the Pennsylvania Department of Com- 
merce. The couple lives at 630 Humph- 
rey Court, Harrisburg 17109. 

FRANCO-DRAKE 

Mary Elizabeth Drake x'67 to John 
A. Franco, May 27, 1967. Mary Eliza- 
beth is a housewife and her husband, an 
attorney, is serving at the New Cumber- 
land Army Depot, awaiting his com- 
mission. The couple is living at M.R., 
Old York Rd., New Cumberland, Pa. 
17070. 

KRAMER-EBY 

Billie Ellen Eby '67 to 1st Lt. Bain 
Kramer, June 24, 1967, at the Moody 
Air Force Base ( Ga. ) Chapel. Janie 
Roberts '68 served as maid of honor. 
Lt. Kramer, a graduate of the Air Force 
Academy, left in December for a one- 
year tour of duty in Vietnam, where he 
is a fighter pilot. The couple is planning 
a three-week vacation in Hawaii in July 
when Lt. Kramer will have a recupera- 
tion and rest period. Address: 15 N. 
Lakeside Dr., Medford, N.J. 08055. 

WILDE-BRACKE 
Margaret T. Bracke to James M. 
Wilde '64, July, 1967, Trinity Episcopal 
Church, Atchison, Kan. Mrs. Wilde is 
a 1967 graduate of Washburn University, 
Topeka. Jim is completing his service 
in the Air Force and plans to enter the 
Graduate School of Social Work, Uni- 
versity of Kansas, next September. Ad- 
dress: 3330 Eveningside Dr., Apt. 22, 
Topeka, Kan. 66614. 

NIXON-HELLER 
Diane Heller '67 to David W. Nixon, 
September 23, 1967. Mr. Nixon is a 
mechanical engineer for Scott Paper Co., 
Chester, Pa. The couple resides at 1004 
Walnut St., Stonewood Apts., Ridley 
Park, Pa. 19078. 

GREEN-HEINBACH 
Geraldine Anne Heinbach x'66 to K<1- 
ward Green Jr., September 30, 1967, St. 
Pius X Catholic Church, Selinsgrove. 
Robert Heinbach '68 and Richard Hein- 
bach x'71, brothers of the bride, served 
as ushers. Geraldine and her husband 
are both employed as decorators for 



40 



Hess Brothers of Allentown, Pa. Ad- 
dress: 825 Linden St., Allentown 18101. 

LOBOSCO-BEAM 
Sharon Lee Beam to Richard J. Lo- 
bosco '68, October 7, 1967, Bound 
Brook (N.J.) Methodist Church. Mrs. 
Lobosco is employed by the law firm 
of Bowlby and Woolson, Somerville, N. 
J. Richard is completing his senior year 
at Susquehanna. 

SURPLUS-HAZLETT 
Claudia Rae Hazlett to William Paul 
Surplus '67, October 14, 1967, First 
Methodist Church of Chenango Bridge, 
N.Y. Frederick Dudley '67 was best 
man. The couple is living at 1607 Rob- 
bins Ave., Apt. 34, Niles, Ohio 44446. 

SANDBERG-EWALD 
Diane Ewald '64 to Carl R. Sandberg, 
October 14, 1967, Our Lady of Per- 
petual Help Church, Ardsley, Pa. Diane 
is associated with John Blair & Co. of 
New York City. Her husband is em- 
ployed by Compton Advertising, Inc. of 
New York. Address: 105 E. 63rd St., 
New York 10021. 

WEICHELT-NURMINEN 
Seija A. Nurminen to Dr. Willi K. E. 
Weichelt '60, October 21, 1967, Hel- 
sinki, Finland. Dr. Weichelt is a vet- 
erinarian and has established his own 
business and animal hospital in West 
Chester, Pa. The couple resides at 1141 
West Chester Pike 19380. 

BROWN-BROSSMAN 
Dorrancc Jane Brossman '65 to John 
Foerster Brown, fall of 1967, Gretna 
Green Chapel, Las Vegas, Nev. Dor- 
rance is a social worker for tire Los 
Angeles Department of Social Services. 
Her husband was graduated from Ho- 
bart College and is completing courses 
at Southwestern Law School, Los An- 
geles. Address: 4181 Kling St.. Burbank, 
Calif. 91505. 

KELLEY-DIETRICH 
Barbara Anne Dietrich '66 to George 
P. Kelley, November 4, 1967, St. James 
Lutheran Church, Frankford, Pa. Bar- 
bara is a housewife and her husband, 
a graduate of Duke University who 
served as an officer with the "Seabees" 
in Vietnam, is a civil engineer. Diatw 
Kellett Reed '66 was matron of honor; 
Anne Ingram '68 and Gwcn Hennejorth 
'68 were bridesmaids. The couple re- 
sides at 2223 Florey Lane, Rosedale 
Court D-6, Roslyn, Pa. 19001. 

HOVIS-PADEN 
Sandra Jean Paden to David B. Hovis 
x'67, November 4, 1967. The couple is 
living at 300 Cornell Ave., Apt. 6, Ha- 
gerstown, Md. 21740. 

SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Mamie Doud Eisenhower, (center) wife of former President- Dwig.hr D. Eisenhower, was 
initiated recently as a patroness of the Gettysburg College chapter of Sigma Alpha lota, 
international music fraternity for women. The initiation was performed in President 
Eisenhower's office at the college by Mrs. Ruth Naylor Shaffer '41 (left) of West 
Chester, Pa., president of Chi Province of Sigma Alpha lota. Also in the photograph 
are Joyce Bond Raessler '60 of Gettysburg. Both Mrs. Naylor and Mrs. Ressler are 
members of the Susquehanna chapter of S.A.I. Mrs. Eisenhower was selected as a 
patroness because of interest in and promotion of the arts. 



BORTZ-WALKER 

Beverly Walker x'67 to Robert D. 
Bortz '67, November 18, 1967, St. Peter's 
Lutheran Church, North Wales, Pa. 
Holly Ford '69 served as maid of honor. 
Dawn Grigg '68 and Sharon Bankert '69, 
were among the bridesmaids. William 
Wrege '67 and Robert Miller '67 served 
as ushers. Betsy Klose '68 was the solo- 
ist and William Wiest '67 was the or- 
ganist. Address: Village Green, Apt. H-6, 
Warminster Road, Hatboro, Pa. 19040. 
NELSON-SCHWARTZ 

Marjorie Lois Schwartz to Charles 
Russell Nelson '61, November 17, 1967, 
Summit Presbyterian Church, Mt. Airy, 
Pa. Mrs. Nelson was graduated from 
East Carolina College, Greenville, N.C. 
CINA-DIETRICH 

Paula Kay Dietrich x'67 to Victor 
Emil Cina, November 18, 1967, St. 
Paul's Lutheran Church, Paterson, N.J. 
Mr. Cina was graduated from the In- 
stitute of Practical Drafting, Newark, 
and attended Newark College of En- 
gineering. He is now taking evening 
courses at Fairleigh Dickinson University 



and is a designer with the American 
Can Co., Fair Lawn. The couple is 
temporarily residing at 42 East Forest 
Ave., Teaneck, N.J. 07666. 

BURRELL-LAMB 
Linda L. Lamb '66 to Robert W. 
Burrell, November 25, 1967, Lancaster, 
Pa. Mr. Burrell is employed by General 
Electric and in the fall of 1968 will 
attend North Carolina State University 
at Raleigh, N.C. Address: Box 602, 
East flat Rock, N.C. 28720. 

GAGNE-UTLKINSON 
Jean Marie Wilkinson '67 to /. Wil- 
liam Gagne Jr. '66, November 25, 1967, 
St. Agnes Church, Lock Haven, Pa. 
Bill is working toward the master's de- 
gree in history at Trinity College, Hart- 
ford, Conn. He also is head varsity of- 
fensive line coach at Central Connecti- 
cut State College, New Britain. Ad- 
dress: 25 Carmel St., Hartford 06106. 

MATHER-LUTZ 
Lynda C. Lutz x'67 to Donald W. 
Mather, December 2, 1967, St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church, Bloomsburg, Pa. Mr. 



Mather is a graduate of Norwich Uni- 
versity in Vermont and is associated with 
die Liberty Mutual Insurance Agency, 
Morristown, N.J. The couple is living 
at 100 Vail Gardens, Parsippany, N.J. 
07054. 

CREENHAGEN-CLARK 

Lucinda Clark to Charles Grcenhagen 
Jr. x'67, December 1967, Lutheran 
Church of the Incarnation, Pompton 
Lakes, N.J. Richard Greenhagen '68 
served as best man for his brother. The 
bride is a graduate of the Presbyterian- 
University of Pennsylvania Medical Cen- 
ter School of Nursing, Philadelphia. She 
is employed by the Tuxedo ( N. Y. ) 
Memorial Hospital. Address: 115 Ken- 
dall Dr., Ringwood, N.J. 07456. 
LICHTY-MURRAY 

Carol Lee Murray to Michael Warren 
Lichty '68, December 22, 1967, Christ 
Lutheran Church, Lancaster, Pa. 
Charles Romberger '68 served as best 
man. Among the ushers were Charles 
McLcsky '68, Keith Betten '69, and 
Gregory Walter '68. Mrs. Lichty is a 
graduate of the Patricia Stevens Fashion 
School, Philadelphia, and was employed 
as an assistant buyer for John Wana- 
maker. Mike, a biology major, is com- 
pleting his senior year at Susquehanna. 
LUNDQUIST-HOEHLING 

Patricia Carrington Hoehling '64 to 
Frederick Lorenz Lundquist, December 
23, 1967, All Saints' Church, Chevy 
Chase, Md. The couple is residing at 
20700 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu, 
Calif. 90265. 

McGOWAN-ROESSLER 

Monika Hildegard Roessler of Julen- 
burg, Steiermark, Austria, to Daniel A. 
McGowan, December 28, 1967. Mr. Mc- 
Gowan is an instructor in economics at 
S.U. He is a graduate of Cornell and 
holds a master's degree from Stanford. 
GIESMANN-HEATH 

Linda Joyce Heath to Larry Allen 
Giesmann '66, December 30, 1967, 
Chevy Chase Baptist Church, Lexing- 
ton, Ky. Mrs. Giesmann was graduated 
from Georgetown ( Ky. ) College and 
earned the master's degree from the 
University of Kentucky. Larry is work- 
ing toward the Ph.D. degree in biolog- 
ical sciences at the University of Ken- 
tucky as a National Science Foundation 
trainee. Address: 2057 St. Michael Dr., 
Lexington 40502. 

FERRARI-WELTY 

Susan K. Welly '67 to Frank F. Fer- 
rari, December 30, 1967, St. Anthony's 
Roman Catholic Church, Lancaster, Pa. 
Donna Ake '67 was maid of honor. Mr. 
Ferrari was graduated from Millersville 
(Pa.) State College and is a salesman 



WINTER 1968 



41 



for Moore Business Forms, Lancaster. 
The couple resides at 1123 E. King St., 
Lancaster 17602. 

GRENOBLE-KERN 
Pamela A. Keni to Frank C. Grenoble 
'68, December, 1967, Redeemer Luth- 
eran Church, Mapleglen, Pa. The bride 
is a graduate of the University of Penn- 
sylvania and was a teacher in the Hav- 
erford ( Pa. ) schools. Frank is com- 
pleting his senior year at Susquehanna. 

MYCHAK-GRECO 

Shirley Greco '65 to Dennis Mychak 
'65, January, 1968, St. Peter and Paul's 
Ukrainian Church, Mount Carmel, Pa. 
Shirley was employed as a social work- 
er by the Pennsylvania Department of 
Public Assistance, Shamokin office. Den- 
nis is a third-year medical student at 
the Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola 
of Chicago. 

TRESSLER-MATHIAS 

Cheryl Ami Matliias to Randall Tres- 
sler x'66, January, 1968, Harris Street 
E.U.B. Church, Harrisburg, Pa. Mrs. 
Tressler attended Harrisburg Area Com- 
munity College. Randy is employed by 
the Pennsylvania Department of Agri- 
culture. 

McKAY-SCHLICHTING 

Christine Schlichting '67 to Brian Mc- 
Kay, January 26, 1968. The couple re- 
sides at 38 Nameaug Ave., New London, 
Conn. 06320. 

CAVE-COREY 

Margaret Anne Corey to E. Lance 
Cave '65, January 27, 1968. Mrs. Cave 
is a graduate of the University of Iowa. 
Lanee is a teacher of biology and earth- 
space science in the Interboro School 
System, Prospect Park, Pa. 

BOUKER-NIXON 

Cynthia Nixon '67 to Jon S. Bouker 

'69, January 27, 1968. Jon is a sociology 

major at S.U. The couple resides on 

Park Road, Hummels Wharf, Pa. 17831. 

NORTON-SMITH 

Barbara Louise Smith '68 to John 
Alden Norton '67, January 27, 1968, 
First Lutheran Church, Carlisle, Pa. 
Johanna Sheese '68 was among die at- 
tendants and James Norton III '64 serv- 
ed as best man for his brother. Ushers 
included Harold Barley HI '67, Gregory 
Walter '68 and Richard Winters '69. 
John is a graduate student at American 
University, Washington, D.C The 
couple resides in Rockville, Md. 

KEIM-SCHUMANN 
Andrea L. Schumann '67 to John D. 
Keim Jr. '67, February 3, 1968. Betsy 
Titus '66 served as maid of honor. Ad- 
dress: 5 Carleton Road, Briarcliff Manor, 
N.Y. 10510. 



HOUGH-ROBINSON 

Rosemary Robinson '67 to R'chard 
Ralston Hough Jr. '67, February 17, 
1968, Christ Episcopal Church, Staten 
Island, N.Y. Diane Christensen '68 
served as one of die bridesmaids and 
William F. Hough x'70 was best man 
•for Ins brother. The couple resides at 
tiie Hillcrest Apts., Lebanon, N.H. 
03766. 



Born Crusaders 



To James W. and Elizabeth Stradling 
Sarbaugh '57, a son, James Michael, 
April 25, 1967. Donegal Heights, R.D. 
1, Mt. Joy, Pa. 17552. 

To Robert R. Jr., Esq. '64 and Adele 
Breese Richards x'65, a son, Michael 
Bailey, June 4, 1967. Bob was gradu- 
ated from die University of Denver's 
College of Law in March of 1967. He 
passed the District of Columbia bar ex- 
amination and is presently working for 
the Department of Labor. 5531 North 
Morgan Dr., Alexandria, Va. 22312. 

To Richard S. '65 and Grace Siming- 
ton Karschner '64, a daughter, Kathryn 
Elaine, July 2, 1967. Richard is band 
director at Northeastern High School, 
Manchester. Edgeboro Dr., Manchester, 
Pa. 17345. 

To R. Jack x'64 and Donna Day Black 
'64, their second child, a daughter, Lisa 
Lynn, July 17, 1967. 604 W. Main St., 
Waynesboro, Pa. 17268. 

To Gregory J. '66 a n d Clowie Mc- 
Laughlin Reiff '67, a daughter, Danielle 
Kimberly, August 15, 1967. Greg is in 
his second year at the Temple University 
School of Dentistry. 1527 Spring Ave., 
Jenkintown, Pa. 19046. 

To Sterling and M a r y Hildcbrand 
Naugle '56, a daughter, Jan Tereas, Sep- 
tember 4, 1967. 10 River Blvd., R.D. 
1, Conklin, N.Y. 13748. 

To David N. and Doris Keener Hol- 
comb '58, their second child, a son, 
Mark Daniel, October 22, 1967. 9441 
Potter Rd„ Des Plaines, 111. 60016. 

To Capt. and Mrs. Robert S. McKee 
'63, their second child, a son, Walter 
Frederic, October 26, 1967. While Bob 
is serving at Bien Hoa Air Base, Viet- 
nam, his wife and children are living at 
her family home in Easley, S.C. His 
service address is: FV3148431, Third 
Tactical Fighter Wing, Box 2696, A.P.O. 
San Francisco, Calif. 96227. 

To Ronald F. and Anna Schelander 
Price x'66, a daughter, Krista Ann, No- 



vember 2, 1967. Mr. Price is employed in 
the Bio-Medical Engineering Department 
of Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital, Chi- 
cago, and also is attending the Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Chicago Circle campus. 
3418 Warren. Apt. 2, Bellwood, 111. 
60104. 

To Harry S. and Eloise Imrie Ransom 
'56, a son, William Andrew, November 
9, 1967. R.D. 2, Woodbine, Md. 21797. 

To Harold J. and Marilyn Huyett 
Becker '54, their second child, a son, 
Barry Glenn, November 9, 1967. 

To Richard and Jean Hill Dehite '51, 
their second child, a son, Richard Alan, 
December 4, 1967. 156 - 13th St., Nor- 
thumberland, Pa. 17857. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Stephen D. Melching 
'66, a son, Eric Vaughn, January 11, 
1968. R.D. 1, Box 83, Butler, Ky. 
41006. 

To George G. and Lois Andren Den- 
liker '5.9, their second child, a daughter, 
Meredith Ellen, January 13, 1968. 1313 
Bay Ave., Point Pleasant, N.J. 08742. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Jack K. Bishop '57, 
a son, Brad Christopher, January 20, 
1968. 3822 Carriage House Dr., Pine 
Brook, Camp Hill, Pa. 17011. 



DEATHS 



The Rev. Dr. Paul HoUenstein Stahl 
'12, Logansport, Ind., November 8, 1967. 
Pastor Stahl served Lutheran congrega- 
tions at Beaver Springs and Beavertown, 
Pa. (1914-1917) and Pearl City, 111. 
(1917-1921). He was then appointed 
head of the Lutheran Home for Children 
at Nachusa, 111. and served in that capac- 
ity until 1942 when he became pastor 
of Holy Communion and St. Mark's Lu- 
theran Churches at Yeagertown and Al- 
farata, Pa. Although he retired from the 
active ministry in 1953, he continued to 
serve for a number of years as a supply 
pastor. 

William S. Livengood, Esq. x'17, 
Somerset, Pa., November 9, 1967. From 
1939 to 1955, Livengood served four 
Republican governors of Pennsylvania 
as secretary of internal affairs. A mem- 
ber of the Army Ambulance Corps unit 
formed at Susquehanna during World 
War I, he was graduated from Juniata 
College and the Dickinson School of 
Law. Juniata later granted him the LL.D. 
degree. Livengood was a high school 
teacher and coach, as well as a practic- 
ing attorney before lie embarked on his 
political career. 

Ellis E. Faster x'23, Richfield, Pa., 
November 17, 1967. Ferster received a 



42 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



teacher's certificate from Susquehanna 
and taught school for 46 years in Perry 
and West Perry Townships, Snyder 
County, Pa. He retired in 1956, but 
continued to substitute in the county 
schools. The first president of the Sny- 
der County branch. Pennsylvania State 
Education Association, he was the «mn- 
ty Representative to the Pennsylvania 
General Assembly from 1948 to 1954 and 
tax collector of West Perry Township 
■for three terms. Ferster was active for 
many years in the Richfield United 
Church of Christ, Snyder County Histor- 
ical Association, Snyder County Chapter 
i f the American Red Cross, and the 
Richfield Lions Club. Among his sur- 
vivors are a son, H. Vernon Ferster x'36. 

Paul R. Conahan '36, Shenandoah, Pa., 
December 1, 1967. Conahan b e g a n 
w( rking for the Prudential Insurance Co. 
in 1939, became staff manager in 1947, 
and later was promoted to manager of 



the Shenandoah, Tamaqua, Mt. Carmel 
and Ashland District. He was a mem- 
ber of the Annunciation Church, Shen- 
andoah. 

Ethel Smyser Kemble '10, Selinsgrove, 
Pa., December 13, 1967. Mrs. Kem- 
ble was the widow of Col. Franklin Kem- 
ble of the U.S. Army. When her hus- 
band retired in 1946 they returned to 
Selinsgrove where she formerly taught 
school. She was a member of Trinity 
Lutheran Church, the Women's Triangle 
Club, Susquehanna University Wom- 
en's Auxiliary, Order cf the Eastern 
Star, and the Conrad Weiser Chapter. 
Daughters of the American Revolution. 

I. Frank Drumhcllcr x. Sunbury, Pa., 
December 18, 1967. Drumheller was a 
retired teacher, having taught at the 
Hoover Island School and in the Upper 
and Lower Augusta Township Schools. 
He retired in 1950 and was a winter 



resident of St. Petersburg, Fla., for the 
past 12 years. He was a member of St. 
Peter's Lutheran Church of Lower Au- 
gusta Township and the Selinsgrove 
Masonic Lodge. 

Anna Beaver Sunday '06, Montours- 
ville. Pa., December, 1967. Mrs. Sun- 
day taught at Tuscarora Academy, 
Academia, Pa., for three years after her 
graduation. She was a member of Beth- 
any Lutheran Church, Montoursville, 
and the United Lutheran Church Wom- 
en. Her husband was the late Rev. O. 
E. Sunday '08. Among her survivors are 
Dr. Harold E. Sunday '32, a son. 

Griffith E. Lewis '6. C J, Boonton, N.J., 
January 11, 1968. Lewis, a 20-year-old 
junior accounting major at Susquehanna, 
died at Mountainside Hospital, Glen 
Ridge, N.J., following a brief illness. 
Memorial services were held in the 
Chapel - Auditorium at the university 
and in his home town. 



Blends with any decor 



A feature of any room 



Ideal for Anytime Giving 



the Susquehanna University Chair 




ORDER BLANK 

□ Attached is $37.00 for a general's chair 

□ Black Arms □ Cherry Arms 

□ Attached is $30.00 for Boston rocker 

□ Attached is $22.00 for a side chair 
I will pay freight charges from Gardner, Mass. 
Normally, allow three or four weeks for shipment. 



Na 



Address- 



Make checks payable to 

The Campus Book Store 

Susquehanna University 

Add 6% for Pennsylvania Sales Tax. 
(Tax is $2.22 for general's chair, $1.80 
for Boston rocker, and $1.32 for side 
chair) 



WINTER 1968 



43 



THE SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 

Susquehanna University 

Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 

17870 




POSTMASTER: Please notify if undelivered. 
Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 1 7870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



37/3 



SPRING 1968 



susquejmmm 


' ALUMNUS J 






Some 800 graduates returned to campus for Alumni Day, May 4. The luncheon program was 
held in the tent for the last time. Next year it will be in the 800-seat dining hall of the new 
Campus Center, pictured on page 11. 



Susquehanna University Alumni Association 

President 

Marl™ R. Fetterolf "23 

Vice Presidents 

Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42 
Dr. Erie I. Shobert II '35 

Recording Secretary 
Dorothy Turner '36 

Treasurer 

Chester G. Howe '52 

Historian 

Dr. John J. Houtz '08 

Executive Board Members-at-Large 

Term expires 1969: Dr. Lawrence C. Fisher 
'31, John Yonkondy '36, Harry W. Butts Jr. 
'48, Dr. Nelson E. Bailey '57, Lynn E. Lerew 
'63. Term expires 1970: Timothy E. Barnes 
'35, Dorothy Eilhardt Gundrum '48, The Rev. 
Dale S. Bringman '48, Dr. James C. Gehris 
'50, Nancy Davis Raab '61 (Mrs. John H.). 
Term expires 1971: Dr. Bryce E. Nicodemus 
'31, George H. Bantley '41, Shirley A. Young 
'51, William C. Davenport '53, George C. 
Liddington '54. 

Representatives on the University Board of 
Directors 
Lawrence M. Isaacs '43 
Louise Mehring Koontz '35 

Representative on the Athletic Committee 
Simon B. Rhoads '30 
Jack P. Shipe '40 




ON OUR COVER 

The impersonal machine world of our 
time sorely needs "an artful way of see- 
ing life" declares associate professor 
George R. Bucher. His unique twine 
sculptures and his belief that the teach- 
er of art must also be a working artist 
are the subject of a feature article be- 
ginning on page 4. 

Ronald E. Berkheimer 
Acting Editor 

Charles H. "Buss" Carr '52 
Director of Alumni Relations 



The SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Vol. 37 



SPRING 1968 



No. 3 



CONTENTS 



Accent on Creativity! 5 

by Charles Price 

SU Sports 8 

by Ron Berkheimer 

Alumni Day 10 

Digest of Minutes 12 

The Newest Alumni 13 

Carr's Column 14 

by Buss Carr '52 

Club News 15 

Susquehannans On Parade 17 

"I Do" 20 



Bom Crusaders 
Deatiis 



21 



22 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Publish- 
ed four times a year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



SPRING 1968 




GEORGE R. BVCHER, associate professor of art at Susquehanna, developed his 
technique of sculpturing with twine because he "wanted to break outside the rec- 
tangle of conventional techniques." 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



'to free us from our limited knowledge 



>> 



Accent on Creativity! 



by CHARLES PRICE 



Like any competent teacher, Susquehanna's first 
full-time instructor in art is thoroughly at home in his 
subject. Sitting in on one of George Bucher's art 
appreciation lectures, an observer quickly become 
aware of the challenge the artist faces as he attempts 
to communicate truth and beauty with canvas, pig- 
ments, and brush. 

But Bucher. who joined the university faculty in 
1965 as associate professor of art, is more than a teach- 
er. He also is a working artist who has achieved a 
new art form with his unique twine sculptures. 

Bucher is as enthusiastic about his own work as 
he is in relating the successes of famous painters and 



sculptors. To him, art is not simply a matter of dec- 
oration or something to be admired. He sees it in- 
stead as an approach to life. To view art only as an 
academic subject is to Bucher a sheer contradiction 
in terms. What we need in die impersonal machine of 
our time, he says, is "an artful way of seeing life." 

In a general sense, it may be said that the func- 
tion of the artist is to help us to see, to hear, to feel, 
and to know. David, who is thought to be the author 
of the 23rd Psalm, understood the shepherd's concern 
for his flock. Moreover, David as an artist was able 
to draw on his own experience as a shepherd to poet- 
ivallv portray his concept of Gods love for man. The 





.. 1 


■1 


/r>S 


H RSaP 




S^-fei; 







"The Serpent" 



"Mutation and Rebirth' 



'Serenity" 



SPRING 1968 



fact that the experience was so common in liis society 
made the psalm more vivid. 

Bucher believes that the plastic arts — unlike 
music, literature, or drama — demand more than a 
faithful rendition. In painting, carving, or sculpture, 
he declares, "performance and creation are one. No- 
body applauds the painter who paints the Mona Lisa 
the second time." To teach art, then, to George 
Bucher, means that one must be a working artist. 

The concept of learning by conversing with a 
master is not new. The physician learns his art in 
part by academic discipline, and in part by practicing 
under the direction of a working physician. The 
musician can learn something of die world of tone 
and harmony in an academic sense, but he can't develop 
proficiency with an instrument unless he studies for 
a time with a performing artist. 

Bucher's concept of the teaching of art is based 
on his understanding of what it means to be a "work- 
ing artist." In the artist's struggle to create, as he 
develops competence in handling his medium, in Iris 
searching, and finally (perhaps) in his successful com- 
munication, art comes out of the realm of the academic 
and becomes a part of life itself. 

Bucher's own art work is many sided. He can 
draw a cartoon in a matter of minutes. He can sketch 
a portrait almost as a matter of second nature, listen- 
ing to a conversation or following a point in a lecture 
at the same time. He can paint a scene so realistic 
that a person looking at it can almost feel the textures. 
But his creative bent is seen most clearly in his "twine 
sculptures." Using such commonplace materials as 
steel wire and binder twine, he has found a medium of 
his own that he is constantly transforming and develop- 
ing. 

Some of his talent would appear to be inherited. 
He knows of an ancestor who was a court sculptor 
to the ruler of Prussia. His father, George W. Bucher, 
still living in Sunbury, Pa., is a self - made artist. 
Bucher confesses that as a boy he found school some- 
thing of a problem. He explains that he perceives 
things visually rather than verbally, but that most of 
education is wedded to the verbal. He maintained 
passing grades, however, and graduated from Sunbury 
High School. 




Bucher chats with students who viewed his exhibit at 
Lycoming College. 



He then entered the Army, becoming a carto- 
grapher and instructor at Fort Belvoir, Va. When his 
tour of duty was completed, he enrolled at the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania where he earned the bachelor of 
fine arts degree with a major in painting and illustra- 
tion (1957) through a co-ordinated program with the 
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. During the next 
two years, he completed the requirements for a master's 
degree at Penn and at the same time studied art ap- 
preciation at the Barnes Foundation in Merion. He 
also worked as a designer and illustrator for the Wistar 
Institute of Anatomy and Micro-Biology. 

Bucher taught art and mechanical drawing at 
Salem (N.J.) High School for a year and then spent 
another year as an instructor and artist at his alma 
mater. Before coming to Susquehanna, he was as- 
sociate professor of art and chairman of the department 
at Sioux Falls College, Sioux Falls, S.D. 

While he was acquiring experience as a teacher, 
he also was developing his method of sculpturing with 
twine. He explains that he "wanted to break outside 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



the rectangle of conventional techniques." His first 
exhibit in the new medium was in 1S81 at the Art 
Alliance in Philadelphia. Since then his work has 
won numerous prizes and has been displayed in sev- 
eral museums in the Philadelphia area, the Galerie 
Noival, New York City (1962); Minneapolis Art 
Institute ,(1963); Sheldon Art Gallery, Lincoln, Neb. 
(1963); Sioux Fall Art Center (1965); Warehouse 
Gallery, Arden, Del. (1965); William Penn Museum, 
Harrisburg ( 1966 ) ; and the Woodstock Theatre, Wood- 
stock, N.Y. (1967). This year he has had an exhibit 
at the Wilkes-Barre Art Center and a small showing 
at Lycoming College. His work also is on display 
at the Galerie International in New York City. 

Bucher produces his twine sculptures by wrapping 
twine around a wire frame and then stiffening it with 
coats of plastic. His figures range from such easily 
recognizable forms as birds and animals to abstract 
pieces like his "Spacial Cross" and "Pre-Natal Space 
Child." He takes his ideas from many sources: auto- 
mobiles (the front of a Volkswagen), athletics (a 
baseball player catching a fly ball), the world of 
work (a 10-foot figure of a coal miner with a pick 
raised over his head.) 

His success is partly due to the fact that he has 
achieved originality without being esoteric. Though 
his work is not photographic, ("I don't compete with 
the camera," he says) it is "representational and rec- 
ognizable." As he puts it: "To make things visible, 
you have to make them relate to the viewer's exper- 
ience." Often, his work seems to capture the feeling 
of motion and lately he has been adding color to the 
twine for special effects. 

Bucher teaches courses in art appreciation as well 
as a laboratory course in design. When he talks about 
his teaching, the listener can appreciate the artist as a 
thinker, almost as a philosopher. His art appreciation 
courses provide a thoughtful introduction to the subject 
of painting and art. But it is in the course in design 
that Bucher's concern for creativity is most evident. 
His purpose in the course is to help each student ex- 
press himself in his chosen medium, or in the medium 
he discovers. When smudges of color are related in 
a meaningful way, something of value is created, just 
as music comes from arranging sounds in an orderly 
or purposeful pattern. 



The purpose of the artist is to search. "Searching 
is legitimate; it is my business," Bucher declares. In 
this search, he sees the emergent'} 7 of values — aesthe- 
tic values, the ability to perceive, and (hopefully) a 
growth of dexterity and a sense of craftsmanship. Stu- 
dents so often draw not what they see, but what they 
feel and think they know. The purpose of the artist 
is to free us from our limited knowledge so that we 
might see what we did not recognize before. 

Out of such discipline, Bucher finds students be- 
coming creative. They develop confidence in their 
ability' to express themselves in an artistic medium, and 
achieve a sense of self-discovery and social growth. 
Working in his own way, the student discovers a feel- 
ing of liberation, a conviction that he has broken the 
shackles of his ows limited understanding of himself, 
of truth, of life. 

Susquehanna receives some excellent publicity from 
Bucher's work. This summer he will exhibit his sculp- 
tures in boardwalk shows at Atlantic City, Virginia 
Beach and Woodstock, N.Y., and in sidewalk shows in 
Greenwich Village and Provincetown, Mass. 

From the standpoint of publicity, the university 
is fortunate in having two working artists on its staff. 
Hilda Kamiol, part-time instructor in art, is a painter 
of wide repute. Mrs. Kamiol, who has been on the 
faculty since 1959, has had exhibits in galleries and 
museums across the nation. 

As working artists, both know the huge outlay of 
time, energy, and money needed to get dieir work be- 
fore the artistic world. Bucher, attempting to gain 
recognition in an unusual medium, invests a consider- 
able portion of his income in traveling to art shows 
and to the sites of his exhibits. Totally committed to 
his work, he has been willing to sleep in his own 
Volkswagen bus, to live on a tight budget, and to 
make other sacrifices he feels are necessary to get his 
work before the art community. Fortunately, his wife, 
the former Ellen Kopenhaver of Sunbury, shares his 
commitment. 

A teacher and a working artist striving to com- 
municate the thrill of creativity, Bucher has much 
to contribute to Susquehanna and to its students. A 
newspaper reporter wrote about him recently: "He's 
really fascinating. And although he may amaze and 
confuse you, he'll certainly brighten the day." 



SPRING 1968 




Jeff Breed of Hudson Falls, N.Y., had a sensa- 
tional freshman season for the S.U. track team. He 
broke four university records, helped set two others 
in relays, and was named the team's outstanding ath- 
lete by coach Ron Thomas. 

Breed's record-setting performances were 21-10 
in the long jump, 43-5/2 in the triple jump, :53.3 in 
the 440, and :56.5 in the 440 intermediate hurdles. In 
addition, he was on the sprint relay team which was 
timed at :44.1 and the mile relay team which ran a 
3:27.2. 

Other new records were set by freshman Gary 
Macia of Lebanon, N.J., with a javelin throw of 179-5, 
and sophomore pole vaulter Tom Snedeker of Norris- 
town, Pa., who leaped 13-3 to better his own 1967 
mark of 12-6. (The records, incidentally, are for the 
nine seasons since the university revived track as a 
varsity sport in 1960. S.U. had track teams from the 
turn of the century until the early 1940s but most of 
the records for these years are missing.) 

Breed finished the season with 160 points, Sned- 
eker with an even 100, and freshman sprinter Mike 





Breed 



Liddick 



Petron of Bogota, N.J., had 92X. The team's 6-4 
record gave Susquehanna its first winning season in 
track since 1964. 

o o o 

S.U.'s other spring teams suffered through losing 
seasons. The baseball team lost seven games by one 
rim and had a 5-16 record. The inexperienced golf 
and tennis teams were 4-6 and 2-9, respectively. 

Gary Gilbert, junior center fielder from Emmaus, 
Pa., led the baseball team in hitting with an average 
of .329. Southpaw Bob Guise of Williamsport, Pa., 
had a 2.64 earned run average and hurled a 13-inning 
shut-out against Albright. Other leading hitters were 
Phil Hopewell, junior pitcher-outfielder from Northum- 
berland, Pa., .28(8; Jimmy Hall, senior second base- 
man from Braidwood, 111., .281; and senior shortstop 
Nick Lopardo of Massapequa Park, N.Y., .260. Hall 
and Lopardo gave Susquehanna a dependable double 
play combination for four years and Lopardo was 
team captain for three seasons. 

John Paterson, senior from Summit, N.J., was the 
only returning letterman on the golf team, which fell 
below .500 this spring for the first time since 1963. 
Paterson and freshman Jim Corner of Watsontown, 
Pa., played in the No. 1 and 2 positions. 

The only veterans on the tennis team were Glenn 
Ludwig, senior from Lititz, Pa., and Dean Ross, junior 
from Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. Freshman Bob Jordan of 
Woodbury, N.J., also played well. Dr. Fred Grosse 
suffered a broken leg shortly before the season began 
and was unable to coach the team this year. Dan 
Wheaton of the English department served as in- 
terim coach. 

o o o 

Wayne Liddick, quarterback and most valuable 
player of the university's 1967 football team, will re- 
ceive a tryout with the Miami Dolphins of the Amer- 
ican Football League. Liddick, who starred in foot- 
ball and wrestling at Montoursville (Pa.) High School 
before coming to Susquehanna, will report to the 
Dolphins' camp at Boca Raton, Fla„ in late June. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Last fall Liddick completed 52 of 108 passes for 
561 yards, averaged 37.4 yards as a punter, returned 
kickoffs and punts, and occasionally played defense. 
When a shoulder injury made it difficult for him to 
throw the ball, he played two games as a flanker, 
catching 8 passes for 97 yards. He will try out with 
the Dolphins as a flanker and punter. Liddick also 
was co-captain of the track team and lettered in wrest- 
ling as a senior. 

o o o 

John Ayer of Southampton, Pa., is the first win- 
ner of the Blair Heaton Memorial Award which is 
to be given annually to the senior man who best typi- 
fies the devotion to scholarship and athletics shown 
by the late Blair L. Heaton. Ayer lettered in soccer for 
four seasons as a wingman and was co-captain for two 
seasons. He also was president of the senior class and 
of the campus chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, national so- 
cial science honor society. Heaton, a member of the 
class of 1942, starred in football and in track. He holds 
what is believed to be the university's high jump rec- 



ord of 6-3% and was assistant football and head track 
coach when he died in I960. 

o a o 

Pick Bechtel, freshman 123-pounder from Selins- 
grove, was named the most valuable wrestler at a 
post-season banquet for the wrestling team. Bechtel 
was undefeated during the regular season. He won 
nine matches (leading S.U. in pins with six) and 
wrestled two opponents to draws. In addition, he had 
a 3-2 record and took fourth place in his weight class 
at the Middle Atlantic Conference tournament. Lamar 
Knight, sophomore 137-pounder from Knoxville, Tenn., 
had a 10-1 record during the past two seasons and is 
17-1 over a two year period. The wrestling team had 
a 6-4-1 record. 

o o o 

Basketball star Pick Eppehimer of Pottstown, Pa., 
closed Iris S.U. career with 2,546 points — an average 
of 28 for each game in which he played. He also led 
the MAC's Northern College Division in scoring for 
the third consecutive season. 



SUSQUEHANNA SCOREBOARD 1967 - 1968 



SU Opp 
BASKETBALL 

76 Scranton 95 
89 Wagner 83 

89 Scranton 9) 

81 Upsala 64 
106 Shippensburg 88 

83 Bloomsburg 84 

85 Delaware Valley 1 10 

77 Albright 66 
99 Juniata 95 

100 Lehigh 85 

99 Lycoming 120 

83 Philadelphia Textile 90 

78 Wagner 123 
64 Albright 62 
97 Elizabethtown 98 
80 Juniata 79 

75 American 95 

90 Wilkes 100 

76 Hofstra 109 

82 Ithaca 100 
95 Delaware 1 1 3 

83 Rider 106 



Won 8 



Lost 14 



WRESTLING 

27 Washington 

1 3 Dickinson 
27 Pembroke State 

6 Juniata 

38 Eastern Baptist 

25 Philadelphia Bible 

14 Bucknell 
29 American 

1 6 Delaware Valley 

8 Hofstra 

32 Wagner 

Won 6 Lost 4 Tied 



7 
19 

8 
25 

5 

6 
20 

7 

16 
29 

5 



SU Opp 
BASEBALL 

3 King's 4 

4 King's 1 
Dickinson 1 
4 Philadelphia Textile 5 
4 Millersville 6 

2 Millersville 8 

3 Albright 
7 Lycoming 4 

2 Delaware Valley 7 
Delaware Valley 6 
7 Juniata 8 

10 Elizabethtown 1 1 

4 Ithaca 10 

3 Ithaca 

4 Bucknell 3 

2 Wagner 3 

Upsala 3 

3 Upsala 7 
2 Wilkes 9 

1 Scranton 7 

4 Hartwick 13 



Won 5 



Lost 16 



GOLF 

3 Gettysburg 1 5 
6'/ 2 King's IP/2 
8 Scranton 1 
7Vi Wilkes IOV2 

12 Delaware Valley 6 

1 1 Franklin £r Marshall 7 
1 1 Vi Elizabethtown 6V2 

3/2 Bucknell 14'/ 2 

4 Juniata 14 



SU 



2 

5 Vi 

1 



TENNIS 

Elizabethtown 

Albright 

Lycoming 

Bloomsburg 

Hartwick 

Bucknell 

Wilkes 

Scranton 

Juniata 

Delaware Valley 

Millersville 



Wo 



Lost 9 



Opp 

5 

6 
8 
6 
8 
9 
8 
3 
7 
3 ', '2 



85 
70 Vi 

88 

58 Vi 
78 
37 
82 
86 

47 Vi 
76 



TRACK 

Gettysburg 59 

Delaware Valley 74 Vi 

Western Maryland 57 



Lycoming 

Hartwick 

Millersville 

Juniata 

Upsala 

Bucknell 

Kutztown 



86Vi 
67 
108 
63 
54 

97 "2 
69 



Won 6 



Lost 4 



Won 4 



Lost 6 



SPRING 1968 




Alumni 



Registration tables are crowded as alumni sign in. 




President Weber congratulates Alumni Award 
winners Merle Beam '22, the Rev. R. L. Lu- 
bold '13, Kenneth Selinger '68 and Sharon 
Fetterolf. '68. 




Bess Fetterolf Keller '16 receives a rose from 
a member of the May Court during the tradi- 
tional honoring of Emeriti Alumni. 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Day 





With President Weber serving as guide ( left) 
many alumni toured the new Campus Center 
which will be put into use next fall. Still 
under construction, the building will contain 
a dining hall, book store, lounges, meeting 
rooms, and many other facilities. Below are 
scenes from the Music Division production of 
"The Pirates of Penzance." 




DIGEST OF MINUTES 

Business Meeting, Susquehanna University 
Alumni Association, Saturday, May 4, 1968 



Susquehanna University Alumni Association met 
Saturday, May 4, 196S for its annual Alumni Day meet- 
ing under the tent. The meeting was called to order 
by President Al Molinaro '50 and the invocation was 
offered by the Rev. Dr. Joseph B. Flotten, Susquehanna 
chaplain. Following the luncheon, Buss Carr '52, 
director of alumni relations, introduced May Queen 
Jodv Sheese and her court, who presented Emeriti 
alumni with roses and members of the 50th reunion 
class with roses and congratulatory mementos from 
President Weber. Dr. John Hamia '35, Alumni Day 
Chairman, assisted. Other reunion classes recognized 
were 1923, 1928, 1933, 193S, 1943, 1948, 1953, 1958, 
and 1963. 

The class of 1968 was offically received into the 
Alumni Association by President Molinaro. John Ayer, 
president of the class, presented a trophy to Robert 
Haclfield, the first senior to reach the top of Mt. Maha- 
noy in the annual mountain climb last fall. Ayer also 
presented the class gift — a check for $8800 — to Dr. 
Weber. Ayer noted that $650 is to be used to pur- 
chase a psychology cross index for the Library and 
that the remainder will provide a communication com- 
plex for the campus radio station. Dr. Weber accepted 
the gift with appropriate remarks and also announced 
that Ayer was selected to receive the first Blair Heaton 
Memorial Award. The award is to be given each 
year to the senior man best typifying the devotion to 
scholarship and athletics shown by the late Blair 
Heaton '52. 

The business session was opened with a motion by 
Dorothy Turner '36, secretary, that the minutes of die 
last general meeting be accepted as reproduced and 
distributed. The motion was passed. Chet Rowe '52, 
treasurer, read his report of a balance of $306.69. The 
report was accepted. Committee reports followed. 

Dr. Hanna thanked all who helped plan and make 
Alumni Day a success and extended a special word of 
thanks to die kitchen staff and maintenance crew. 
Erie Shobert '35, chairman of the Loyalty Fund com- 
mittee, reported that cash and pledges for this year 
have reached $40,000. The goal for the fund is $100, 
000. Buss Carr, reporting for the club activities com- 
mittee, announced that 13 district clubs met this 
spring and that several others have scheduled meet- 
ings for this summer or fall. Harry Butts '48, chair- 
man of the nominations committee, presented the 




CONFERENCE OF PRESIDENTS 
Molinaro '50 and Dr. Weber. 



Marlyn Fetterolf '23, Al 



following slate of officers for the coming year: Marlyn 
Fetterolf '23, president; Edward Rogers '42 and Erie 
Shobert '35, vice presidents; Dorothy Turner '36, sec- 
retary; Chester Rowe '52, treasurer; Bryce Nicodemus 
'31, George Bantley 41, Shirley Young '51, William 
Davenport '53, and George Liddington '54, members- 
at-large of the Executive Board. There being no fur- 
ther nominations, all candidates were declared elected. 
The following persons, all of whom are members of 
the S.U. faculty or staff, were presented for honorary 
membership in the Alumni Association : G y n i t h C. 
Giffin, Charles E. Lyle, Kenneth O. Fladmark, Bruce 
D. Presser, Gladys H. Freed, Elizabeth Wiley, John 
H. Longaker, James M. Stoltie, Frank W. Fletcher, 
John M. Reade, Gerald R. Gordon, Leone E. Re, 
Ronald E. Berkheimer, Tarn Poison and Catherine E. 
Steltz. All were approved. 

Alumni Awards were then presented by Chester 
Rowe, chairman of the Awards Committee, to Kenneth 
R. Selinger of Merion Station, Pa., and Sharon L. 
Fetterolf of Johnstown, Pa., the Senior Man and Wom- 
an Most Typifying the Ideals of Susquehanna; and 
to Merle Beam '22 of Windber, Pa., and Raymond 
Lubold '13 of Selinsgrove, Pa., For Service. 

The luncheon meeting was closed with the sing- 
ing of the Alma Mater led by Catherine Strese '68 and 
accompanied by Michael Carl "69. 

Respectfully submit ted, 

Dorothy Tubneb '36, Secretary 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



THE NEWEST ALUMNI 



Two hunched forty-four seniors and three honorary degree recipients became 

alumni of Susquehanna on June 2, raising the total number of alumni to 5,932. 



Bachelor of Arts 

Sumnw Cum Laudc 
Samuel David Clapper, Windber, Pa. 
Nancy Ellen Dewsbury, Wantagh, N.Y. 

Magna Cum Laudc 
Norrine Louise Bailey, Lewistown, Pa. 
Kathleen Mary Baynes, Woodstown, N.J. 
Patricia Anne Corbin, Kingsley, Pa. 
Robeit Bruce Donmoyer, Lititz, Pa. 
Ann Lenore Stauffenberg, West Hazleton, Pa. 
•Cheryl Riley Stickle, Broomall, Pa. 

Cum Laude 
•Mercedes Louisa Baker, Bethayres, Pa. 
James Armacost Bowman, Littletown, Pa. 
Alinda Anne Brown, Millersburg, Pa. 
Sharon Lee Fetterolf, Johnstown, Pa. 
Laleah Dawn Grigg, Oreland, Pa. 
Willard Mudget Grimes, III, Wayne, N.J. 
Gail Eileen Kantrowitz, Roselle, N.J. 
Hans Konrad Klar, Selinsgrove, Pa. 
Victor Joe Lazarow, Flushing, N.Y. 
Catherine Louise Miehener, West Chester, Pa. 
°Marilyrj Hope Moritz, Scottsdale, Ariz. 

Rite 
°Karen Laurel Adams, Flushing, N.Y. 
John William Arnold, Stamford, Conn. 
John Warren Ayer, Jr., Southampton, Pa. 
Linda W. Baehr, Wayne, Pa. 
Dennis Michael Baker, McClure, Pa. 
John Gregory' Ballentine, Pluckemin, N.J. 
Martin Wayne Banschbach, Hicksville, N.Y. 
Douglas George Bauer, Leonia, N.J. 
Katharine Welty Beard, Selinsgrove, Pa. 
Mary Elizabeth Beeson, Sussex, N.J. 
Willard Dean Bickel, Gilberts ville, Pa. 
°David Paul Bingaman, Montgomery, Pa. 
Susan Elaine Bishop, Wenonah, N.J. 
Kathleen Lois Blunt, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 
Carl David Bose, Wantagh, N.Y. 
Terry Robert Bossert, Qnakertown, Pa. 
Carl Raymond Bovaird, Bala Cynwyd, Pa. 
James Edward Bowman, Jr., Shamokin Dam, 

Pa. 
Paul Edward Britt, Lewistown, Pa. 
Barbara Jane Brought, Lutherville, Md. 
•Monroe Alan Bruch, Allentown, Pa. 
David Raymond Bull, Mamaroneck, N.Y. 
Karalee Anne Buttorff, New Cumberland, Pa. 
Albert William Byrnes, York, Pa. 
Mary Ann Carpenter, Scranton, Pa. 
Gail Carter, Westfield, N.J. 
Keith Robert Chamberlain, Selinsgrove, Pa. 
Elizabeth Ann Charles, Ringoes, N.J. 
Anita Gayle Claycomb, Somerset, Pa. 

°°Judith Ann Coman, Phoenix, Md. 

•Francine Ruth Cooper, Wyalusing, Pa. 
Sally Lynn Curnow, Fort Washington, Pa. 

°Don Edward Dallabrida, Kulpmont, Pa. 
Arline May Davis, Doylestown, Pa. 

Barbara Jean Dick, New Cumberland, Pa. 
Jennifer Beaumont Downey, Cheltenham, Pa. 

Sharon Ernst, Selinsgrove, Pa. 

Constantine C. Exarhos, Warrington, Pa. 

•Donald Walter Fasold, Danville, Pa. 

David Michael Faust, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Sally Elizabeth Feitig, Stroudsburg, Pa. 

••Jean Elizabeth Field, Granby, Conn. 

Ruth Alice Flanders, Wayne, N.J. 

Janet Katherine Fowler, Glenside, Pa. 

Patricia Ann Frost, Massapequa, N.Y. 

Margaret June Funk, New London, Conn. 

Karen Ann Geiger, Dunmore, Pa. 

Wayne Ross Gibson, Richmond Hill, N.Y. 

Peggy Ann Gilbert, Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 

H. Donald Glaser, Jr., Baltimore. Md. 

Joanne Debra Goglia, South Plainfield, N.J. 

Loye Lorraine Gover, Sr.nbury, Pa. 

Gail Ellen Graham, Levittown, N.Y. 

Frank Calvin Grenoble, Jr., Williamsport, Pa. 

John Robert Griffiths, Scranton, Pa. 

Brian A. Gross, Trevorton, Pa. 

Andrew Norton Grover, Springfield, Mass. 

Joan Lee Hackett, Highland Lakes, N.J. 

Samuel Joseph Halpern, Short Hill, NJ. 

Nancy Aline Hamor, Camden, N.J. 

Dianne Lee Harshman, McKecsport, Pa. 



John Havas, Teaneck, N.J. 

Robert Allen Heinbach, Jr., Selinsgrove. Pa. 

Gwerj Ann Heiineforth, Glenside, Pa. 

Ronald James Hill, Westwood, N.J. 

Erie Laurens Horn, Alexandria, Pa. 

Cecil Loy Hornbeck, Jr., Sunbury, Pa. 

Denise Clair Horton, Cheltenham, Pa. 

James Paul Howard. Lansdowne, Pa. 

Richard Allen Hutter, Cedar Grove, X.J. 

Man Anna Ingram, Lansdowne, Pa. 

Christa J. Jorgensen, Brooklyn, X.Y. 

Elizabeth Elmer Kauimaim, SeLinsgrove, Pa. 

John David Kelley, Jr., Wayne, N.J. 

Richard Alan Kellogg, W'estfield, N.J. 

Jeffrey Thomas Ketaner, Morris\ r ille, Pa. 

Margaret Ann Keyser, Toronto, Ontario 

Robert James King, Montoursville, Pa. 

Benjamin Larzelere, III, Fountainville, Pa. 

Jeffrey Allen Leese, Thomasville, Pa. 

John Frederick Lehr, York, Pa. 

Barbara Ann Leonard, Sunbury, Pa. 

William Arthur Lewis, Jr., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Michael Warren Lichty, Gordonville, Pa. 

Wayne C. Liddick, Montoursville, Pa. 

Kathleen Edith Livingston, Lancaster, Pa. 

Jerome Eveler Lynch, Silver Spring, Md. 

Gary' Hughes Manifold, Stewartstown, Pa. 

\l.i\ine Manning, Rosemont, Pa. 

Constance L. Mason, Tuckahne, \.J. 

Charles Hamilton McLeskey. North Hills, Pa. 

Elizabeth Ann McNulty, Williamsport, Pa. 

Patricia Ami Mehrer, Havertowu, Pa. 

John Anthony Meyer, Wyckoff, N.J. 

Richard Frederick Michael, Hanover, Pa. 

Trudy Jean Miller, York, Pa. 

Gerald J. Miskar, Mahanoy City, Pa. 

John Charles Morrill, II, Holbrook, Mass. 

Stephen Randall Nace, Selinsgrove, Pa. 

Challis Arlene Niles, Springfield, Pa. 

Nancy Lee Oliver, Ardsley, N.Y. 

Donald Paul Orso, Rethesda, Md. 

Arlene Claire Peterson, Pennsauken, N.J. 

Gregory Douglas Phillips, Carbondale, Pa. 

Cynthia Lyn Piatt. Bordentown, N.J. 

Richard G. Poinsett, Allentown, N.J. 

Pamela Joan Rosemary Racltke, Feasterville, Pa. 

Mary Elizabeth Reichner, Wyncote, Pa. 

Richard Martin Rex. Lehighton, Pa. 

Nancy Anne Rickenbaugh, MiHlintown, Pa. 

Sally Brown Ridgley, West Chester, Pa. 

Deborah Elizabeth Ritter, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Edith Ellen Rogers, Yardley, Pa. 

Joanne Lillian Romano, Union, N.J. 

Charles John Romberger, Wilburton, Pa. 

Maryheth Ann Russell, Glenshaw, Pa. 

Robert Lewis Russell, Salisbury', Md. 

Roy Kumbe Sadler, Tanzania, East Africa 

Patricia Ann Sanderson, Royersford, Pa. 

David Mathers Sandham, West Chester, Pa. 

Frank Joseph Sawicki, Atlas, Pa. 

Laura Emily Scaife, Williamsport, Pa. 

Russell Donald Schantz, Jr., Trumbauersville, 

Pa. 
Janet Margaret Schmaltz, West Pittston, Pa. 
Richard L. Schuster, West Chester, Pa. 
Ruth Ann Seigfried, Hamburg, Pa. 
Kenneth Roger Selinger, Merion Station, Pa. 
Donald Paul Shadle, Tower City, Pa. 
James L. Shaffer, Towanda, Pa. 
Johanna Lynn Sheese, Annville, Pa. 
Carol L. Slezak, New Alexandria, Pa. 
"Barbara Louise Smith, Carlisle, Pa. 
Evelvn Charlotte Smith, Broomall, Pa. 
Kenneth William Steller, Little Falls, N.J. 
Gary Nelson Stiegler, Baltimore, Md. 
Kenneth Robert Stoker, Ivyland, Pa. 
Mallory Ann Storer, Shaker Heights, Ohio 
Nancy Joanne Stroup, Kreamer, Pa. 
Carol Ann Sutcliffe, Wayne, Pa. 
Kenneth Peter Swarthout, New Providence. N.J. 
Frederick Richard Swavely, Gilbertsville, Pa. 
Marsha Miriam Tamke, Staten Island, N.Y. 
Maureen Louise Thomas, Ashland, Pa. 
Alison Wood Townsend, Doylestown, Pa. 
David Stephan Unger, West Lawn, Pa. 
Stephen M. Vak, Mahanoy City, Pa. 
Pi la Andra VanDyke, Secane, Pa. 



"Francis Joseph Wttcro. jr.. Mt. Carmel, Pa. 
Linda Elaine Wales, York, Pa. 
Gregory Allan Walter, Chambersburg, Pa. 
Virginia Ellen Ward, Berkeley Heights. N.J, 
Anthony Michael Weaver, Elizabethville, Pa. 
Trixanna Weber, Wilmington, Del. 
Susan Love Wershing, Ridgewood, N.J. 
Linda Ruth Woolbert, Shavertown, Pa. 
Suzanne Yenchko, Hazleton, Pa. 
Nancy Elaine Ziesch, Camden, N.J. 
Richard Joseph Ziobro, Bloomfield, N.J. 

Bachelor of Science 

1 Business Administration > 
Cum Laude 
Richard Leon Steinberg, Wallingford, Pa. 

Rite 
Richard Allan Baker, Tamaqua, Pa. 
Eric Carl Bergmann, Port Washington, N.Y. 
Gary Lee Bittinger, Harrisburg, Pa. 
John B/dil. Jr.. Sunbury, Pa. 
Richard John Cromwell, Southampton, Pa. 
Arthur Darryl Ebersberger, Severna Park, Md. 
Richard Judson Eppehimer, Jr., Pottstown, Pa. 
Ray Henry Ewig, Middleburg, Pa. 
Daniel M. Fornataro, Hazleton, Pa. 
Robert E. Forse, Montoursville, Pa. 
Harold F. Geise, Sunbury, Pa. 
Paul Ray Geist, Jr., Selinsgrove, Pa. 
Lester Edwin Goodman, II, Bethlehem, Pa. 
Louis Bernard Greenberg, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Roln-rt Wayne Hadfield, East Greenwich, R.I. 
Richard Stephen Haines, Haddon Heights, N.J. 
John Stephen Hale, New Cumberland, Pa. 
Jmini\ Harrison Hall, Braidwood, 111. 
Henry H. Herrington, Levittown, Pa. 
Barry Richard Jackson, Springfield, Pa. 
Richard Joseph Lobosco, Middletown, N.J. 
David G. Lomison, Jersey Shore, Pa. 
Thomas R. Long, Pine Grove, Pa. 
Nicholas Anthony Lopardo, Massapequa Park, 

N.Y. 
James Louis Lubrecht, II, Harrisburg, Pa. 
°Leonard Joseph Marzano, Schnecksville, Pa. 
Richard Spencer McAllister, Severna Park, Md. 
Donald A. McBane, Morrisville, Pa. 
Thomas Bailey Meyer, Plainfield, NJ. 
James Basil Nayduch, Mayfield, Pa. 
Gerald Richard Pacella, Willingboro, N.J. 
John C. Paterson, Jr., Summit, N.J. 
"Michael Perot, Flourtown, Pa. 
Frederick Louise Phelps, III, North Wales, Pa. 
Marilyn Jean Pierce, Glen Ridge, N.J. 
Christopher Starkey Robbins, Wayne, N.J. 
Thomas Gerald Paul Roberts, New Kensington, 

Pa. 
Bruce Robert Shallcross, Richboro, Pa. 
Jeffery Penrose Spencer, Warrington, Pa. 
Richard Donald Sports, New Britain, Pa. 
Ernest Milton Stauffer, Weatherly, Pa. 
Dennis Authony Surovcik, Coaldale, Pa. 
Dennis Lee VanName, Haddonfield, N.J. 
Robert Craig Vogel, Wynnewood, Pa. 
Leonard Albert Willinsky, G(irardville, Pa. 
Richard Conrad Young, Tenafly, NJ. 
Ralph George Ziegler, Franklin, NJ. 

Bachelor of Science (Music Education) 

Sally Ann Carril, Hagerstown, Md. 
°Lorma Arnold Crow, West Chester, Pa. 
Sally Ann Davis, Forty Fort, Pa. 
Ellen Anne Hill, Allentown, Pa. 
Benjamin Leroy Jones, Chambersburg, Pa. 
Betty Anne Klose, Huntington Valley, Pa. 
Charlotte Lenore Knupp, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Thomas Russell Milbrand, Shamokin, Pa. 
Jeffrey Lynn Noble, Hanover, Pa. 
"Mary Elizabeth Pierce, Allentown, Pa. 
°James Robert Reaser, Milton, Pa. 
Harold Larry Roberts, Shickshinny, Pa. 
°°Jean Louise Sawyer, Nazareth, Pa. 
Walter LeRoy Startzel, Jr., Elysburg, Pa. 
Catherine Lynn Strese, Media, Pa. 
Carolyn L. Tritt, Chambersburg, Pa. 
Joan Elizabeth Vondercrone, Nazareth, Pa. 
Evelyn A. War, Totowa, N.J. 
Nan Weller, Elysburg, Pa. 



° Completed requirements for graduation in January 196S 



° ° Did honors work while enrolled at Susquehanna 



SPRING 1968 



13 



5U50UE 

Carr's Column 



! \ 



by BUSS CARR '52 



Alumni Weekend 1968 . . . 

Was it the weather, the year, or was everyone eag- 
er to see the growing campus at Susquehanna? Regard- 
less of the reason. May 3-5 was one of the best Alumni 
Weekends ever at S.U. More than 800 alumni re- 
turned to the university for one tiling or another this 
year. The awards and reunion luncheon Saturday 
afternoon was attended by about 500 persons and 
Saturday evening there were 140 at the dinner dance. 
Twenty-eight golfers participated in the tournament 
and the winners, who received their awards at the 
dinner-dance were Florence Rothermel Latsha '40 and 
Ed Rodgers '42. There is no way of estimating how 
many attended the musical, but there were about 250 
at the Alumni Worship Service and another 100 at the 
get-together at the home of Warren and M argot Giau- 
que Pirie, both '49. Reunion classes returned this 
year as they never have before. Hats off to the re- 
union chairmen who did such a great job getting their 
classmates to come back to the university. I never 
saw a group of alumni enjoy anything more. If you 
missed this year, I suggest that you circle the dates of 
May 2, 3, and 4 for 1969. Can the classes ending in 
4 and 9 do as well as those ending in 3 and 8? 

District Club Meetings . . . 

There were 13 district club meetings this spring 
and the nearly 600 alumni who attended these meet- 
ings constitute about 10? of the total alumni body. 
Every meeting was filled with enthusiasm and the 
expectation of what lies ahead for Susquehanna. Dr. 
Weber attended many of the meetings and was happy 
to see so many people becoming interested in Susque- 
hanna. After one meeting, an alumnus was so enthus- 
ed with recent developments that he said he would 
double his gift this year. Think what would happen 
if everyone would do the same. 



Molinaro '50 to Fetterolf '23 . . 

Sounds like a forward pass combination, but for 
S.U. alumni it means that Al Molinaro is our outgoing 
president and that Marlyn Fetterolf is the new presi- 
dent. Al was president for two years and, although 
he took a job in Indiana during his tenure, he re- 
mained as close to the university as possible. All 
alumni thank Al for his efforts and appreciate the job 
he did. 

Now we turn to Marlyn Fetterolf of Johnstown, 
who will cany on where Al left off. The Fetterolf 
name is synonymous with Susquehanna. I know of 
no other family that is as interested and devoted to 
S.U. as the Fetterolfs. The Alumni Association can 
be confident that this interest and devotion will be 
immediately evident. Look out, we may call on you 
next. 

Award Winners . . . 

At the Alumni Luncheon on Saturday, May 4, 
we honored two alumni and two seniors. Merle Ream 
22 and Ray Lubold T3 were honored for their service 
to Susquehanna and very deserving recipients they 
are. Roth have clone and continued to do a great deal 
for their alma mater. I'd like to take this opportunity 
to congratulate these men and to say that I look for- 
ward to continuing to work with them in the future. 
The seniors were Ken Selinger of Merion Station, Pa., 
and Sharon Fetterolf of Johnstown. They also are 
very deserving. By the way, is the name Fetterolf 
familiar? Sharon is the daughter of Frank '48 and 
the granddaughter of our new president, Marlyn '23, 
and his wife, Mable Kinzey Fetterolf '24. 

Perhaps you feel someone you know should be 
nominated lor an alumni award. If so, let us know. 
All of you must be aware of some deserving alumni, 
so don't keep it a secret. Send us their names, along 
with as much background as possible, and they will 
be presented to the proper committee. 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



CLUB NEWS 



SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY 

The annual spring dinner meeting of 
the Susquehanna Valley Club was held 
March 2 at the Fanner's Best Restaurant 
in Lewisburg, Pa., with 42 members 
present. Nelson Bailey, outgoing club 
president, conducted a short business 
meeting. Henry Albright '54, reporting 
for the nominating committee, presented 
the following slate of officers who then 
were elected: Roger Holtzapple '59, 
president; Harold Bollinger '39, vice 
president; Joan Ortolani Billig '65, sec- 
retary; and Carl Campbell '65. treasurer. 
Buss Carr gave a resume of planned 
activities for Alumni Weekend and 
Warren Pirie '49, director of psycholo- 
gical services at the university, spoke 
about "The Susquehanna Approach to 
the Psycho-Social Problems of Its Stu- 
dents." Dr. Weber also spoke briefly, 
outlining what has taken place at S.U. 
during the past few years and what can 
be expected in the future. 

CENTER-UNION 

The Center-Union District Club held 
its annual dinner meeting Friday, March 
29, at St. Luke's Lutheran Church, 
Centre Hall, Pa. Forty members were 
in attendance and enjoyed a ham din- 
ner served family style. Don Spooner 
'43, club president, conducted the meet- 
ing. The Rev. Dr. Joseph Flotten, S.U. 



chaplain, spoke about college students 
today and more specifically about stu- 
dents at Susquehanna. Buss Carr gave 
a brief resume of die progress on cam- 
pus and discussed plans for Alumni Day. 
Linda Iaeger '69 presented several vocal 
selections and was accompanied at the 
piano by Michele Resh '70. 

PHILADELPHIA 
Again the Philadelphia .Area District 
Club had a big meeting with 139 at- 
tending the annual dinner dance Satur- 
day, March 30, atop the Barclay Build- 
ing on City Line Avenue. Classes with 
the S.U. seal were presented to every- 
one who attended. President Paul A. 
Wagner '50 conducted a brief business 
meeting, after which Buss Carr an- 
nounced the plans for Alumni Day. Dr. 
Weber was the main speaker. Dancing 
followed the singing of the Alma Mater. 

WILLIAMSPORT 

The Williamsport District Club held 
its annual dinner meeting on Monday, 
April 1, at the Lycoming Hotel in Wil- 
liamsport. Twenty-six members attend- 
ed. Mrs. Winifred Myers Odell '49, 
president, welcomed the group and in- 
troduced Don Berninger '52, who served 
as master of ceremonies. Buss Carr dis- 
cussed the progress of the building pro- 
gram at S.U., announced Alumni Day 
plans, and showed slides of the campus. 



The main speaker was Dr. Howard E. 
DeMott, pr. fessor of biology, who talked 
about the students at Susquehanna to- 
day. 

LEWISTOWN 

The annual spring dinner meeting of 
the Lewistown District Club was held 
at die Birch Hill Supervisors Club. 
Burnham. Pa., Tuesday. April 2 widi 30 
members present. Bob Snyder '40, presi- 
dent, conducted the meeting. Buss 
Carr brought greetings from campus and 
encouraged everyone to return for 
Alumni Day. Betsy Kl.se '68 sang 
several vocal selections, accompanied 
by Betsy Sautter 70 at the piano. Dr. 
Weber was the main speaker. He told 
the group of the many changes that 
have taken place at the university dur- 
ing the past ten years. New officers for 
the coming year are: Herbert Yingling 
'63 president; Edward Rhodes '57, vice 
president; and Phyllis Swartz Den" '49, 
secretary-treasurer. 

HARRISBURG 
The Harrisburg Area Alumni Club had 

one of its most successful programs ever 
with a dinner-dance on Friday, April 5, 
at the West Shore Country Club, Camp 
Hill. There were 80 alumni and friends 
in attendance. Janice Adams John '59, 
president, conducted a business meeting, 
which included the election of the fol- 
lowing new officers: Richard J. Tietbohl 
'60, president; William C. Davenport '53. 
vice-president; Joyce Sheesley Shirey '62, 
secretary; and Catherine Byrod Whit- 
man '44, treasurer. Buss Carr made a 
few remarks about Alumni Day and Dr. 
Weber, the main speaker, talked about 
the future of the university. Ted 
Hutcheson '34, surprised Jan John by 




cMcKlTI 



1918 



SPRING 1968 



15 



nting her a plaque in appreciation 
for her efforts in working with the Har- 
risburg Alumni Club. 

NORTH JERSEY 

F i f t y persons attended the annual 
spring dinner meeting of the North 
Jersey Alumni Club at Dan Dowd's 
Steak House in West Orange on Satur- 
day, April 6. Gerry Herbster "58, presi- 
dent, conducted the business meeting. 
New officers elected for two-year terms 
are George '54 and Lorraine Rariek Lid- 
dington '52, presidents; Robert '53 and 
Peggy Brady Wyllie '56, vice presidents; 
John '62 and Nancy Davis Raab '61, 
secretary-treasurers. Buss Carr brought 
greetings from campus and Dr. Weber 
was the main speaker. 

JOHNSTOWN 

Forty persons were present for the 
annual dinner meeting of the Johnstown 
Area Club on Friday, April 19, at the 
Green Gables in Jennerstown, Pa. Frank 
Fetterolf '48, president, conducted a 
brief business meeting. The present of- 
ficers were re-elected for another year. 
Vernon Blough '31 and his wife, Marie, 
presented hand-made recipe holders as 
gifts from their workshop to the Johns- 
town area alumni who contributed 16 
seats to the Chapel- Auditorium. Buss 
Carr then brought greetings from cam- 
pus and discussed future plans at S.U. 
Dr. Otto Reimherr, professor of philos- 
ophy and religion, was the main speaker. 
He talked about Susquehanna's summer 
programs in Europe. 

SOUTH JERSEY 

The South Jersey Alumni Club held 
its a n n u a 1 dinner meeting Saturday, 
April 20, at the Congress Inn in Burling- 
ton, N.J. Forty-four alumni, parents, 
and guests attended. Dave Schumacher 



'64, president, conducted the business 
meeting. Plans were made for a family 
gathering this summer. Officers for the 
coming year are: Ken Erdley '55, presi- 
dent; Leslie Butler '62, first vice presi- 
dent; Richard Biedennan '64, second 
vice president; Judy Arnold Mclntyre 
'62, secretary; Peter Nunn '57, treasurer; 
and Cathy Mackey '65, Dave Schumach- 
er '64, Ralph Shockey '36, Douglas Spotts 
'63, and Richard Talbot '66, directors. 
Buss Carr announced plans for Alumni 
Weekend and introduced Dr. Weber, 
who was the main speaker. He discussed 
the university's plans for the future and 
urged everyone to come to the campus 
for a first-hand look. 

PITTSBURGH 

The spring dinner meeting of the Pitts- 
burgh Area Alumni Club was held Mon- 
day, April 22, at the Glass Towers 
Motor Inn in Coraopolis, Pa. Thirty-six 
alumni and friends were in attendance. 
Pete Shuty '38, president, conducted a 
brief business meeting during which the 
following officers were elected: Eugene 
Gundrum 48, president; Harry Johnston 
'49, vice president; and Dorothy Eil- 
hardt Gundrum '48, secretary. Buss Carr 
then introduced Dr. Weber, who spoke 
of Susquehanna's plans for die future. 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 

The annual spring dinner meeting of 
the Washington, D.C. Area Alumni Club 
was held Friday. April 26, at the Evans 
Farm Inn, McLean, Va., with 26 mem- 
bers present. Robert Curtis '63, presi- 
dent, conducted the business meeting. 
Paul Haines '31 presented a constitution 
for adoption by the club and it was 
unanimously approved. The following 
officers were elected for the coming year: 
John A. Schoffstall '33, president; Karl 



Schaffrath '64, first vice president; Freida 
Dreese Dunkle '29, second vice presi- 
dent; and Lois Renfer '52, secretary- 
treasurer. Buss Carr announced plans 
for Alumni Weekend and urged every- 
one to return to campus. Dr. Weber 
was the main speaker. He discussed the 
university's plans for expansion and im- 
provement. 

NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Members of the Northeastern Penn- 
sylvania Alumni Club held their annual 
dinner meeting Monday, April 29, at 
Aldino's Manor in Wilkes-Barre with 27 
alumni and guests present. President 
Roland Rosetti '51 conducted the busi- 
ness meeting. The group discussed proj- 
ects the club could consider. It was 
decided to send a questionnaire to all 
the members allowing each to express 
his own opinions. Harold Shaffer '40, 
chairman of the club activities committee 
of the general alumni association, spoke 
briefly about the activities of other dis- 
trict clubs. Buss Carr announced plans 
for Alumni Weekend and also spoke 
about present and future plans at Sus- 
quehanna. Carl Mover '63, associate 
director of admissions, was the main 
speaker. He discussed past and present 
admissions policies and procedures. 

CHAMBERSBURG - HAGERSTOWN 

The annual spring dinner meeting of 
the Chambersburg - Hagerstown District 
Alumni Club was held Friday, May 10, 
at the Ostennan House in Chambers- 
burg with 16 members in attendance. 
President Lynn Lerew '63 made a few 
announcements and then introduced 
Buss Carr, director of alumni relations, 
who was the main speaker. Alumni 
Weekend was discussed and the progress 
taking place on campus was reviewed. 




1923 



1928 



16 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Susquehannans 
On Parade 



'15 

Dr. J. Frunk Faust, who retired in 
1958 as superintendent of schools in 
Chambersburg, Pa., was honored at a 
recent dinner of the school directors. He 
received a bronze plaque, embossed with 
his likeness, which will be placed in a 
new junior high school that has been 
named for him. He was employed by 
the Chambersburg school system for 36 
years. 

The Rev. Dr. Lester G. Shannon is 
serving Zion Lutheran Church, Sunbury, 
Pa., as vice pastor. 

'22 

George W. Townsend and his wife 
are cottagers at the Allegheny Lutheran 
Home, Goucher St., Johnstown, Pa. 

'23 

The Rev. Lewis F. Foltz retired early 
this year as chaplain of the Veterans 
Administration Hospital, Philadelphia. 
He and his wife, the former Edna Goff 
'23, are making their home with Dr. 
Ralph H. '49 and Susan Foltz Tietbohl 
'5?.' Sinking Spring, Pa. 

'24 

The Rev. W. John Derr was honored 
on May 5 at a testimonial dinner com- 
memorating his 40 years of service at 
Holy Trinity Church in Bellerosc. 
Queens, New York City. The dinner was 
attended by 800 members of the con- 
gregation, friends, and relatives. 

'25 

Norman R. Benner, M.D., attended the 
recent Organ Week at Susquehanna. In 
addition to being a physician and radiol- 
ogist, he has been a member of the 
American Guild of Organists since 1949 
and has served as organist-choir director 
at St. John's Lutheran Church, Johnson- 
burg, Pa., since 1935. 

The Rev. Dr. Harland D. Vague and 
his wife, the former Sar« Hassinger '26, 
will celebrate the 40th anniversary of 
their wedding and of Dr. Fague's ordina- 
tion to the ministry during the first week 



of July. He is p a s t o r of Emmanuel 
Lutheran Church, Naples, Fla. 

Tire Rev. Guy M. Lubold has moved 
from Sharon Center, Ohio, to Lynchburg. 
Ohio, and is pastor of St. Paul Lutheran 
Church there. 

'30 

Raymond P. "Rip Gorman, in addi- 
tion to teaching chemistry at Red Bank 
(N.J.) High School, also is a radar- elec- 
tronics instructor at the Fort Monmouth 
Signal Corps School. 

'31 

John P. Senko of Hazleton was one of 
eight science teachers who received 
honor certificates as outstanding teach- 
ers from the Chemical Industry Council 
of Eastern Pennsylvania. 

'35 

The Rev. Robert R. Clark, editor of 
periodical publications for the Lutheran 
Church for 12 years, returned to parish 
work as pastor cf Christ Church, Sipes- 
ville. Pa. He and his wife are parents 
of Philip Clark '62 and Priscilhi Clark 
Bashore '66. Priscilla is married to Lt. 
Larry Bashore '66. 

'37 

The Rev. Dr. Raymond E. Shaheen, 
pastor of St. Luke Lutheran Chur c h , 
Silver Spring, Md., was the guest speaker 
at a Lenten service at Zion Lutheran 
Church, Sunbury, Pa. 

Clyde R. Spitzner has been named 
station manager of WFIL-TV, Philadel- 
phia, flagship outlet of Triangle Stations. 
He retains his title of sales manager. He 
and his wife, the former Helen Wentzel 
'37, live in Gladwyne, Pa. 

'38 

The Rev. James B. Diffenderfer is 
pastor of Christ Lutheran Church, 
Schoenersville, Pa. He was formerly 
pastor of Trinity Lutheran, Fairless Hills, 
Pa. 

'40 

Harold E. Shaffer recently spent sev- 
eral days on the S.U. campus as a con- 



sultant to the university's Department 
of Education. He observed student 
teachers and conducted evening discus- 
sions on teaching techniques and cur- 
riculums. An associate professor of so- 
cial studies at West Chester State Col- 
lege, he was on sabbatical leave during 
the spring semester to teach, observe, 
and evaluate teachers in several states. 

'41 

Dr. Leon E. Krouse, associate professor 
of finance at L e h i g h University, is 
among five academicians awarded fel- 
lowships to attend die 1968 resident ses- 
sion of The Stonier Graduate School of 
Banking at New Brunswick, N.J. diis 
summer. He also has been granted 
leave for the 1968-69 academic year to 
complete research on a book now in 
progress and to pursue advanced study 
in quantitative methods. 

'47 

Dr. John R. Leach, former member of 
the S.U. faculty now teaching at Jersey 
City (N.J.) State College, has written 
a book entitled "Functional Piano for 
the Teacher," published by Prentice Hall. 
Inc. He is married to the former 
Elizabeth Ann Miller '47. 

'48 

George A. Cooper has been appointed 
secretary of the group pension depart- 
ment, Connecticut General Life Insurance 
Co. He and his wife and five children 
live at 8 Crestwood Rd., West Hartford, 
Conn. 

'49 

Paul R. Bingaman has been appointed 
principal at State College (Pa.) High 
School. He is also a candidate for a 
doctoral degree in educational admin- 
istration at Penn State. 

'50 

Janet Wolf Statler and her husband 
and daughter were the subjects of a 
recent article in the Johnstown Tribune. 
The article was about their hobby of 
traveling in the family kayak. 



SPRING 1968 



17 





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1943 



1948 



Hon'50 

Dr. William A. Russ, Jr., who has re- 
tired after teaching history at Susque- 
hanna for 35 years, was honored by the 
campus chapter of Phi Mu Delta fra- 
ternity at a banquet to celebrate the 
fraternity's 50th anniversary. He re- 
ceived a plaque for his many years of 
service to the chapter. 

'53 

Robert C. Wyllie has been promoted 
to industrial engineering supervisor of 
industrial insulations at the Manville 
(N.J.) plant of the Johns - Manville 
Corp. His wife, the former Peggy Brady 
x'56, has been elected president of the 
Metropolitan New Jersey Alumni As- 
sociation of Alpha Delta Pi sorority. They 
are the parents of two children and 
live in Fanwood, N.J. 

'55 

James J. Gonnley is employed in the 
product development department of 
Rohm and Hans, Philadelphia, 



'56 

Capt. Donald L. Hartman is serving 
at Martin Army Hospital, Fort Benning, 
Ga. He is a physician and has been 
employed as a dermatologist at the 
Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pa., 
and the Tover's Clinic, Madisonville, 
Ky. 

Dr. Glen E. Smith, assistant chief of 
medicine at the U. S. Public Health 
Service Hospital, Galveston, Tex., attend- 
ed a seminar on leprosy at the National 
Leprosarium in Carville, La. 

Dr. Harold M. Trabosh, veterinarian, 
is a staff officer in toxicology and biolog- 
ical residues with the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture in Consumer and Market- 
ing Service. He and his wife and three 
children live at Bailey's Cross Roads, Va. 

'57 

Scott Anderson is teaching biology 
for the Shamokin ( Pa. ) Area School 
District. 



'58 

Richard L. Purnell wrote an article 
entitled "Making Effective Use of Game 
Films," for Football Clinic, a magazine 
widely circulated among high school 
and college coaches throughout the 
country. 

'59 

Dr. Eugene Witiak, in addition to Irs 
work as a veterinarian in the Lehigh 
Valley area, has been doing research 
and writing. Two of his articles ap- 
peared in the April and September is- 
sues of Veterinary Medicine, with the 
latter also winning a national clinical 
photographic contest. 

'60 

Donald A. Winey is a synthetic or- 
ganic chemist for Rohm and Haas, Phil- 
adelphia, and is in the process of com- 
pleting the requirements for his Ph.D. in 
organic chemistry at the University of 
Pennsylvania. He and his wife, the for- 
mer Patricia Bodlc '60, and their children 



18 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



appeared in February on the CBS-TV 
program, The 21st Century. 

'62 

Leslie R. Butler, 21 S. Summit Ave., 
Pitman, X.J.. has been elected an as- 
sistant treasurer of the First Pennsylvania 
Banking and Trust Co. in Philadelphia. 

William H. Clark Jr. has passed the 
Uniform Certified Public Accounting Ex- 
amination and is a partner in the ac- 
counting firm of W. D. Fisher and Co. 
of Selinsgrove. 

Dr. Stanford C. Sholley Jr. recently 
passed the Pennsylvania dental board 
examination and has opened a practice 
in Mifflinburg. 

'63 

George E. Amerman has been re- 
elected president and general manager 
of the Sunbury Foods Co. 

Capt. Robert S. McKee has received 
the U.S. Air Force Outstanding Supply 
Officer Certificate at the Bien Hoa base, 
Vietnam. He was selected for the award 
by the Air Force Chief of Staff for 
proficiency in fulfilling supply respon- 
sibilities. The honor qualifies recipients 
for assignment to high level positions 
in supply fields which control more than 
half of the Air Force budget. 

Ann Ferrence Met; works as a junior 
biologist in the clinical pathology de- 
partment at the Veterinary Research 
Farm, CIBA Pharmaceutical Co., Flem- 
ington, N.J. 

Donald A. Whitko is working in the 
Reading area as an adjuster for the 
Nationwide Insurance Co. 

x'63 

Donna L. Gulick is working for the 
Philadelphia Hospital. She lives at 610 
\V. Olney Ave., Philadelphia 19120. 



'64 

Eugene C. Boughner is teaching Ger- 
man at Shamokin ( Pa. ) High School. 
He expects to complete the require- 
ments for his master's degree this sum- 
mer at Bucknell. Last summer he w as 
a participant in an NDEA Institute for 
advanced German at the University of 
Scranton. 

George A. Kxrch.net is a second year 
student at the University of Virginia 
Dental School. He and his wife, the 
former Carol Cox x'65, are living in 
Richmond, Va. Carol is working as a 
medical technologist at Reynolds Metals. 

Kenneth E. Kratzer is in his first year 
at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic 
Medicine. 

Thomas C. McCarriek is employed as 
a loan and trust department officer with 
the First National Bank, Philipsburg, Pa. 

James B. Norton III is teaching speech 
in the Coatesville ( Pa. ) Area School 
District. Jim is working on a master of 
arts degree in speech at Temple Uni- 
versity and will teach a six-week drama 
course for high school students this 
summer. 

Ira G. Ritzman is employed as a tech- 
nician with The Radio Corporation of 
America at Lancaster, Pa. 

Richard W. Rumhel is a junior at die 
Georgetown University Dental School. 
Washington, D.C. 



'65 



Ens. Milton M. Kuhn returned home 
from Vietnam last summer, but is re- 
turning for another tour of duty this 
spring. 



Jacquehjn J. Loughridge is a social 
worker for the Wilmington (Del.) De- 
partment of Public Welfare, Child Wel- 
fare Services. She lives at 8 DeVille 
Circle, Apt 10, Wilmington. 

Samuel E. Metzger is teaching junior 
high mathematics and is an assistant 
football coach and junior high basketball 
coach at Cove Central High School, 
Martinsburg, Pa. 

Glenn W. Miller was promoted to 
Army Specialist 5 while serving with the 
Third Armored Division near Kirch Gons, 
Germany. He is an intelligence clerk. 

Barbara Maier Reindict/ is with the 
General Electric Co., New York City, 
in the Employee Relations Service. 

Lt. (j.g.) John F. Scholl left for Viet- 
nam in April after nine weeks of sur- 
vival training and learning die Vietna- 
mese language in California. He is 
stationed at Qui Nhon and is the officer 
in charge of a patrol boat. His address 
is 702966, Coastal Division 15, F.P.O. 
San Francisco, Calif. 96641. 

Suzanne R. Springer a third year stu- 
dent at Jefferson Medical College, served 
as medical health trainee last summer 
at Samuel Dickson State Hospital, South 
Mountain, Pa. 

Alfred M. Unglaug is employed as an 
industrial engineer with the Jones and 
Laughlin Steel Corp. He is also attend- 
ing Carnegie Mellon University, Pitts- 
burgh. 

2nd Lt. Karl E. Westerville was award- 
ed silver pilot wings upon graduation 
from flight training school at Reese AFB, 
Tex. He has been assigned to Ching 
Oman Kang Air Base, Taiwan for duty 
with a unit of the Pacific Air Forces. 




1953 



1958 



SPRING 1968 



19 



'66 

Ens. James W. Good is serving as 
deck division officer aboard the U.S.S. 
Mnllany. The ship was in the western 
Pacific earlier this year. 

Stephen D. Melehing is on active duty 
with die U.S. Navy. He has completed 
gunnery school at Great Lakes. 111. 

x'66 

Janice H. O'Donnell is supervisor of 
the stenographic department and recruit- 
ing officer for the Stone and Webster 
Engineering Corp., Boston. Her address 
is 285 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. 02115. 

•61 

F. Kent Bonny is employed in the 
accounting department of Amchem Prod- 
ucts Inc. of Philadelphia. 

Theodore N. Kuhacki is on military 
leave from Sears Boebuck and Co., at- 
tending Officers Candidate School at 
Fort Benning, Ga. He enlisted in No- 
vember. His a d d r e s s is : OC Ted 



i i 



I Do 



> ? 



GEHRING-HASONICH 
Carol Ann Hasonich '67 to Charles F. 
Gehring, February 17, 1967, Bethlehem, 
Pa. Carol will teach elementary music 
this fall in the Palmerton (Pa.) schools. 
Her husband is an accountant. The 
couple lives at 754 Lafayette Ave., Palm- 
erton 18071. 

HAY-KOSLOW 

Tonia Anne Koslow '65 to John Penn 
Hay, Jr., April 29, 1967, United States 
Merchant Marine Academy, Kings Point, 
Long Island, N.Y. Vicki Sue Lawler 
Yohe '64 served as one of the brides- 
maids. Tony is a student at San Fran- 
cisco State College, working for cer- 
tification as an elementary teacher. She 
also plans to study for a master's degree 
in nursery school education. Her hus- 
band, a 1965 graduate of die Merchant 
Marine Academy, is working for die 
Marine Engineers Beneficial Association. 
The couple resides at 1430 Francisco St., 
San Francisco 94123. 

I'OHTI-BACH 

Christine M. Bach to William P. Forti 

'65, August, 1967 Bill is a student at 

Temple University of Medicine and is 

president of the campus chapter ef Phi 



Kubacki RA 11762806, 63 Co., 6th Stu 
Bn., TSB, USASIS (3 pit), Fort Ben- 
ning, Ga. 

A / i c e J. Lahey is employed as a 
chemist in the analytical section at 
Beecham Pharmaceuticals, Soudi Plain- 
field, N.J. 

Sandra Crowl Walker is teaching 
junior high Spanish and French in the 
Lansdowne-Aldan School District. Her 
husband, Ens. William R. Walker '65, 
is a naval aviator stationed in DaNang, 
Vietnam. 

x'67 

Joseph A. Munzer is a composition 
and arranging major at die B e r k 1 e e 
School of Music, Boston, Mass. He will 
graduate next January. He also is a fac- 
ulty member at die Portsmouth (N.J.) 
School of Music. 

Specialist 4 David C. Wetzel has been 
in Germany since August of 1966. He 
will be discharged in February, 1969, 
and plans to finish college. 



Rho Sigma, a medical fraternity. Ad- 
dress is: 5928 N. Marvine St., Phila- 
delphia 19141. 

PACKER-BUBGEE 

Diane Foster Burgee x'70 to Daniel 
Leroy Packer, August 12, 1967, Church 
of the Bedeemer, Baltimore, Md. Diane 
had been attending Lock Haven State 
College. Her husband attended Buck- 
iu-11 University and is serving with the 
Army in Korea. 

HALL-PHEATT 

Pamela Joan Pheatt to Jimmy Harrison 
Hall '68, August 26, 1967, Oak Lawn, 
111. Nicholas Lopardo, '68 served as best 
man and Thomas Meyer '6S was one of 
the ushers. Jim, who graduated this 
month, will join the Harrisburg office 
of die Equitable Life Assurance Society. 
CHRISTAUDO-LEANER 

Lucia K. Learner x'67 to Lawrence 
A. Christaudo, October 1, 1967. Lucia 
is a graduate of Buffalo Seminary. She 
also attended Rochester Institute of 
Technology. Her husband has been 
studying for die bachelor of science 
degree in photography at Southern Illi- 
nois University. The couple resides at 
227 N. 14th St., Murphysboro, 111. 62966. 
BOBST-KEIM 

Patricia Keim to Maurice II. Bobst 
Jr. '61, October 21, 1967, Trinity Luth- 
eran Church, Camp Hill, Pa. A I a n 
Fuller '61 served as one of the ushers. 



Maurice is an agency supervisor in the 
Harrisburg office of die Aetna Life and 
Oasulty. The couple lives at 4171 King 
George Drive, Harrisburg, 17109. 

KENNEDY-MORAN 
Jennifer Moran to John H. Kennedy 
III '67, January 26, St. Paul's Church, 
Ardmore, Pa. Mrs. Kennedy is an 
alumna of the Packer Collegiate Institute, 
Brooklyn, and the Berkley School in New 
York. John is assistant department man- 
ager for Strawbridge and Clothier, Phil- 
adelphia. The couple lives in die Lake- 
side Apartments., Apt. 17D, Melrose 
Park, Pa. 19126. 

STRECKER-DRIES 
Lynda Louise Dries '63 to Edward G. 
Strecker. Lynda is teaching elementary 
vocal music in the Freeport (N.Y.) 
schools. The couple resides at 145 Ran- 
dall Ave., Freeport 11520. 

DEITH-ORTIZ 

Lynn Ortiz '68 to Harry A. Deith '67, 
March 2, Mamaroneck (N.Y.) Methodist 
Church. Linda laeger '69 was the solo- 
ist, Gail Carter '68 was a bridesmaid and 
Dean Kennedy '67 and Jimmy Hall '68 
were ushers. Lynn has been attending 
the University of Georgia in Athens and 
is expected to receive the bachelor of 
arts degree from Susquehanna in Sep- 
tember. Harry is an Ensign in the Naval 
Reserves and is attending Naval Supply 
Corps School in Athens, Georgia. Ad- 
dress: 11-A Eastwood Court Apts., Win- 
terville Rd., Athens, Ga. 30601. 

WILLIAMS-MAKAR 

Zolna Fruzsina Makar '67 to John 
Paul Williams '6'7. March 22, Hungarian 
Presbyterian Church, Franklin, N.J. 
Zolna also attended the University of 
Basel, Switzerland. She taught German 
in the Elmira (N.Y.) schools during the 
past academic year. John is an office 
manager trainee with the John Hancock 
Mutual Life Insurance Co., Philadelphia. 
SQUIRE-SOWERS 

Susan Ann Sowers to Gregory David 
Squire '69, April 27, Z i o n Lutheran 
Church, Sunbury, Pa. Kurt Reinhart '69 
served as an usher. The bride is a re- 
ceptionist for W. D. Fisher and Co., 
Selinsgrove. Greg will enter his senior 
year at Susquehanna in the fall, major- 
ing in biology. The couple is residing at 
238 N. Market St., Selinsgrove 17870. 
HIMELBERGER-SEIGFRIED 

Ruth A. Seigfried '68 to Bernard Le- 
roy Himelberger, May 11, St. John's 
Lutheran Church, Hamburg, Pa. Ruth 
majored in mathematics at S.U. Her 
husband is with the Air National Guard 
at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, 
near Biloxi. 



20 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



BACHRACH-SILVER 
Beverly Silver to Dr. Alan Bachrach 
'64, May 2.5. in Boston, Mass. The 
bride is a graduate of Emerson College 
and teaches junior high English and 
speech. Alan was graduated from the 
University of Pennsylvania School cf 
Veterinary Medicine on May 20. He 
has accepted a 15-month internship at 
the Henry Bergh Memorial Hospital in 
New York City. The couple resides at 
191 Knickerbocker Rd.. Apt. 2. Engle- 
wood, N.J. 07631. 



Born Crusaders 



To Mr. and Mrs. Randolph A. Cole- 
man '66, a son, Randolph, Jr., August 
17, 1967. Randy is in his second year 
at Purdue University, working toward 
the Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry. 
809 N. 6th St., Apt. 4, Lafayette, Ind. 
47904. 

To George and Nancy Reeser Ryan 
x'61, their second child, a daughter, 
Melissa Anne, September 19, 19 67. 
George is employed as a motor products 
representative for Sun Oil Co., Provi- 
dence, R.I. office. 92 Sun Valley Dr., 
Cumberland, R.I. 02864. 

To Samuel R. '63 and Joyce Sheesley 
Shirey '62, their first child, a son, Sam- 
uel Rhine, Jr., September 23, 1967. 1290 
Oyster Mill Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011. 

To Herbert K. '63 and Gayle Troxell 
Tingling '60, their second daughter. 
Debra Kay, December 30. 1967. Deidre 
Ann was bom December 27, 1965. Gayle 
is teaching mathematics in die Mifflin 
County School District. Herb is tax 
collector for the district. Box 1 2 2 A , 
Lewistown R. D. 3, Pa. 17044 

To Mr. and Mrs. George E. Sadosuk 
'64. a son, Douglas, January 18, George 
was promoted to process and quality 
control manager last year at Owens- 
Corning Fiberglass Corporation, Hunt- 
ingdon R. D. 2, Pa. 16652. 

To A. Scott and Linda Youhon Collins 
'57, their first child, Scott Llewellyn, 
January 29. 16 Kirkwood Rd., Port 
Washington, X.Y. 110.50. 

Samuel R. x' 66 an d Mary Lee 
Andrews '66, a son, Christopher Jon, 
February 2. 459 Ludlow Ave., York, Pa. 
17403. 

To Walter H. Rice III '6S and Nancy 
Lee Rice x'68, a daughter. Kimberly 
Kerr, February 4. Edgewater Beach 
Apts., Edgewater Park, N.J. 07020. 




1963 




1968 



Mr. and Mrs. John H. Longaker, Jr.. 
a son, David Richard, February 11. Mr. 
].< ngaker is assistant professor of history 
at Susquehanna. 901 X. 9th St.. Selins- 
grove 17870. 

Paul J. '69 and Susan Fegely Hampel 
'67, a daughter, February 12. Selins- 
grove R.D. 1 17S70. 

T. Dennis 69 and Barry Bacon Pritts 
x'69 a daughter. Lisa Ann, February 27. 
446 X. 7th St.. Sunbury, Pa. 17801. 

To Paul I. and Carolyn Berkheimer 
Ernst '59, their second son. Michael 
Dean, March 14. 36 Bruce Court. Mill- 
town. X.J. 0S850. 

To the Rev. and Mrs. David G. Yolk 
•52. their third child, a daughter, Sarah 
Elizabeth, March 24. 306 Park Ave., 
Freehold, X.J. 07728. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Rutis- 
hauser, Jr. '67, a son, April 2. Tom 
works in the Personnel Department cf 
Forgflo Corp., Sunbury. Pa. 351 S. 



Market St., Selinsgrove 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harmon L. Andrews 
'53, a daughter, Sara Ann. April 8. 3923 
Shelley Rd., Huntingdon Valley. Pa. 
19006. 

To the Rev. James T. 64 and Dena 
Sebastian Parks '66, a daughter, Jennifer 
Lynn, April 20. P.O. Box 52, Zion Hill, 
Pa. 1S981. 

To Dr. Spurgeon and Barbara Easton 
Johns 52, a son, James Andrew, April 
26. 6153 Parkside Rd.. Flourtown, Pa. 
19031. 

To Woodrow and Diannc Dorm an 
Mengel x'66, a son. Timothy Alan, April 
24. Selinsgrove R. D. 2 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Terry Kissinger '64, 
their third daughter. Kellee Sue, April 27. 
400 X. 9th St., Selinsgrove 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Russell I. Fisher '63, 
their third son. Matthew Wan-en, May 
4. 429 Brierly Lane. Pittsburgh, Pa. 
15236. 



SPRING 1968 



21 



DEATHS 



Leon A. Bickel '28, Sunbury, Pa. Mr. 
Bickel earned the master of arts degree 
at Bucknell University and was a sales- 
man for Lyons and Camahan, publishers. 

Alberta Swortwood Dohl '28, Olean, 
N.Y. Mrs. Dohl is survived by her hus- 
band, /. Paul '28. 

Calvin P. Ginter x'19, Altoona, Pa. 
Mr. Ginter left Susquehanna to serve in 
the Army during World War I. He also 
attended Gettysburg College and work- 
ed as a car repairman for the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Co. He was a Methodist 
and had served the church as a Sunday 
School superintendent, trustee, treasurer, 
and member of the Conference Board on 
Lay Activities. In addition, he was ac- 
tive in the Masons and the Boy Scouts. 

Martha Bodman Martz '34 ( Mrs. Her- 
man J.), Ashland, Pa. Mrs. Martz 
formerly taught at Conyngham ( Pa. ) 
Township High School. 

The Rev. Milton S potts '08, Taos, 
N. M. 

Eloy Z. Blanco '23, Central Hershey, 
Cuba, August 11, 1967. One of three 
brothers who received bachelor's de- 
grees from Susquehanna in 1923, Mr. 
Blanco had returned to Cuba after his 
graduation and was associated with the 
Hershey Sugar Mills. He is survived by 
his widow, two sons, and a daughter. 
His brothers, Henry R. and Ruben, pre- 
ceeded him in death. 

The Rev. Edwin R. Eastman, Trenton, 
N.J., December 1, 1967. Among Pastor 
Eastman's survivors are his wife, the 
former Shirley Bell '55. 

Thomas A. Brannan '28, Plains, Pa., 
December 19, 1967. 

The Rev. Hillis G. Berkey '31, Rock- 
wood, Pa., January 31. Pastor Berkey 
received the bachelor of divinity degree 
from Gettysburg Theological Seminary. 
He was pastor of St. Luke's Lutheran 
Church, Rockwood, from October of 
1945 until his death. Previously, he had 
served the Williamstown and the Jerome- 
Boswell (Pa.) charges and for diree 
years (1924-27) he was a member of 
the U.S. 110th Infantry Band. He is 
survived by his widow, one son, a 
granddaughter, two brothers and a sister. 

Lewis Sheaffer x'63, Shamokin, Pa., 
February. 

The Rev. Ralph R. Bergstresser, Coral 
Gables, Fla., February 3. A graduate 



of Gettysburg College (1928) and the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Get- 
tysburg, Pastor Bergstresser served 
churches in Steubenville and Niles, Ohio; 
Highspire, Pa.; and Coral Gables. Sev- 
eral members of his family attended or 
were graduated from Susquehanna. They 
are his mother, the former Nellie Rupley 
'04; his father, the late Rev. Ralph H. 
Bergstresser '06; his brothers, Daniel '40, 
Pliilip '41, Stephen x'43, and the Rev. 
John '48 (married to the former Dawn 
Ebert '44 ) ; and a sister, the former 
Rachel Bergstresser x'49, married to the 
Rev. Howard Hugus '48. 

Charlotte Berlew Phillips x, Hazleton, 
Pa., February 3. Mrs. Phillips studied 
violin at Susquehanna and Bucknell. She 
had been a member of the Mendelssohn 
Club of Sunbury, several local perform- 
ing groups, and the Art League of Hazle- 
ton. 

Elmira Sassaman Dean '41 (Mrs. 
Henry S.), Lewistown, Pa., February 21. 
While at Susquehanna, Mrs. Dean was 
a member of Omega Delta Sigma 
Sorority, the Business and German So- 
cieties. She was a partner in the R. M. 
Sassaman Oil Co. and a member of 
Lewistown United Presbyterian Church, 
Lewistown Chapter of the Order of 
Eastern Star, and the Toll Gate Parent- 
Teacher Association. 

Alice Gartner Fischer '98, Bala Cyn- 
wyd, Pa., February 23. She was the 
widow of the Rev. Dr. M, Hadwin 
Fischer '02, former professor at the Get- 
tysburg Theological Seminary. Mrs. 
Fischer earned the master's degree from 
Cornell University and pursued addi- 
tional graduate study at the University 
of Pennsylvania. She taught Latin at 
high schools in Berwick, Williamsport, 
and Lansdowne, Pa., and was one of 
the founders and the first president of 
the Gettysburg YMCA. She also was 
active in the Adams County Crippled 
Children's Society and other community 
organizations in the Gettysburg area. 
She is survived by a daughter, three 
sons, seven grandchildren, and one 
great-grandchild. 

Dr. Philip L. Harriman, Lewisburg, 
Pa., March 2. Dr. Harriman taught psy- 
chology at Bucknell for 34 years prior 
to his retirement in 1964. He then 
served as visiting professor of psychology 
at Susquehanna. He earned bachelor's 
and master's degrees from Colgate Uni- 
versity, the master of education degree 
from Harvard, and the doctor of philos- 
ophy from New York University. 



H. S t u a r d Flickinger, Selinsgrove, 
March 4. Mr. Flickinger was an em- 
ployee of the W. F. Groce Silk Mills, 
Selinsgrove, for 50 years. He also served 
as a school director in Perm Township 
and was a member of St. Paul's United 
Church of Christ, the Dauntless Hook 
and Ladder Co., and the Masons. He 
is survived by a son, Harry S. Flickin- 
ger, Jr. '48, a granddaughter, a brother 
and a sister. 

John G. Yost Sr. '2.9, Altoona, Pa., 
March 4. Mr. Yost had taught in the 
Altoona schools for 42 years. He earned 
the master of education degree at Buck- 
nell University in 1947. 

Clyde L. Mane vol '07, Williamsport, 
Pa., and Miami, Fla., March 6. He was 
co-owner of the Clyde L. and James C. 
Maneval Funeral Home, Williamsport. 

The Rev. Dr. William R. Fitzgerald 
'11, Selinsgrove, March 9. Pastor Fitz- 
gerald earned the bachelor of divinity 
degree in 1914 at Susquehanna and was 
awarded the doctor of divinity in 1933. 
He served congregations at Wilkes-Barre, 
Beaver Springs, and Kreamer, Pa., dur- 
ing a career of more than 50 years in 
the Lutheran ministry. Also active in 
the Masons, the Snyder County Welfare 
Association, and the Red Cross, he is 
survived by his wife, the former Susan- 
nah Moyer '13; a daughter-in-law, the 
former Anna Skirving, widow of Dr. 
Orville M. Fitzgerald '38 and of Profes- 
sor Frederick C. Stevens hon'50; four 
grandchildren, two sisters, and a brother. 
The Rev. George N. Young '27 was one 
of the officiating ministers at the funeral 
services. 

Mae Schoch Moyer '04 (Mrs. J. Clif- 
ford ) , Selinsgrove, March 20. Mrs. 
Moyer also attended Lock Haven State 
College and taught in the Snyder County 
schools. She was a member of Trinity 
Lutheran Church and the Women's Aux- 
iliary of Susquehanna. 

Nellie E. Derrickson x, Selinsgrove, 
March 25. Miss Derrickson attended the 
Camden ( N.J. ) schools and resided in 
Hollis, Long Island, until 1951 when she 
moved to Selinsgrove. She was a mem- 
ber of Trinity Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, the Susquehanna University 
Women's Auxiliary, and the Women's 
Triangle Club. Among her survivors are 
an uncle, William M. Schnure '99; a 
cousin, Jane Schnure '39; a nephew, 
James P. Schnure x'69; and a niece, 
Sally Schnure '6.5, married to Lt. William 
E. Lindsay. Jr.. '64. 

Brig. Theodore J. Osborne '35, Kearny, 
N.J. April 3. He was graduated from 



22 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



the Salvation Army Training College in 
New York in 1938 and served succes- 
sively in Albany, Pittsburgh, Newark, and 
New York. He became financial secretary 
in 1958 when he went to the territorial 
headquarters in New York and three 
years ago became assistant property 
secretary. 

Mary Schnure Burrell (Mrs. Matthew 
M. L.) '32, Millmont, Pa., April 26. Mrs. 
Burrell was a third grade teacher at 
the Laurelton ( Pa. ) Elementary School 
since 1949. Prior to that she taught in 
the Mifflinburg (Pa.) school district for 
28 years. She was a member of Christ's 
United Lutheran Church, Mifflinburg; 
the Pennsylvania State Education As- 
sociation, and Mifflinburg Chapter 152, 



Order of the Eastern Star. Her husband, 
a daughter, two sons, five grandchildren 
and a brother survive. 

Mrs. Mary Rachel Volk, Boswell, Pa., 
May 1. Among her survivors is a son, 
the Rev. David G. Volk '52. 

Mary Woodruff Martin '19, St. Peters- 
burg, Fla., May 17. Mrs. Martin also 
received the master of arts degree from 
Susquehanna in 1922. She taught at the 
university for nine years in the depart- 
ment of English and Latin. She is sur- 
vived by her husband, Dr. Basil F. 
Murtin x'28, a daughter and a son. Mrs. 
Martin was a sister of the late Ralph W. 
Woodruff '20 and a daughter of the 
late Dr. John I. Woodruff '88, acting 
president of the university in 1901-1902. 



Dr. B. Meade Wagenseller '91, Liver- 
pool, Pa., May 19. The last surviving 
member of the Missionary Institute class 
of 1891, Dr. Wagenseller earned the 
bachelor of arts degree at Bucknell, die 
master of arts at the University of Penn- 
sylvania, and the doctor of pharmacy 
at Temple University. He taught for 
several years in public schools in Penn- 
sylvania, for more than 30 years at 
Temple University, and served for some 
time as director of the clinical laboratory 
at the Selinsgrove State Colony for Ep- 
ileptics, now the Selinsgrove State School 
and Hospital. Dr. Wagenseller maintain- 
ed an interest in Susquehanna and at- 
tended the Alumni Day festivities in 
1965 and 1966. 



Blends with any decor 



A feature of any room 



Ideal for Anytime Giving . . . 



the Susquehanna University Chair 











ORDER 


BLANK 




□ 


Attached 


is 


$37.00 


for 


a 


general's chair 






□ Black 


Arms 




□ 


Cherry Arms 




□ 


Attached 


is 


$30.00 


for 


Boston rocker 




□ 


Attached 


is 


$22.00 


for 


a 


side chair 


1 will 


pay f 


reight cha 


rges from Garc 


ner 


, Mass. 


Norma 


My, a 


low three 


or 


four weeks 


for 


shipment. 


Name 
















AHHrP« 




































Make checks payable to 

The Campus Book Store 

Susquehanna University 

Add 6°o for Pennsylvania Sales Tax. 
(Tax is $2.22 for general's chair, $1.80 
for Boston rocker, and $1.32 for side 
chair) 



SPRING 1968 



23 







1968 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 




Sept. 


21 


OTTERBEIN at Westerville, Ohio 


H 


Sept. 


28 


WESTERN MARYLAND at Selinsgrove 




Oct. 


4 


BLOOMSBURG STATE at Bloomsburg, Pa. 




Oct. 


12 


ITHACA at Ithaca, NY. 


HC 


Oct. 


19 


UPSALA at Selinsgrove, Homecoming 




Oct. 


26 


LYCOMING at Williamsport, Pa. 


H 


Nov. 


2 


JUNIATA at Selinsgrove, Parents Day 




Nov. 


9 


WAGNER at Staten Island, NY. 


H 


Nov. 


16 


DELAWARE VALLEY at Selinsgrove 




H: K 


ickoff 1 :30 p.m. HC: Kickoff 2 p.m. 



THE SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 

Susquehanna University 

Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 

17870 




FOSTMASTER: Please notify if undelivered. 
Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



SUMMER 1968 



.. 



3?>y 



mmHRMR 



alumnus 






w 



1 



- 



A 



.A • 







IN MEMORIAM 



No one was a more loyal son of Susquehanna. Clyde Reidler Spitzner '37 
not only held many offices, including president of the Alumni Association and 
of the Philadelphia District Club, but was first vice president of the Univer- 
sity's Board of Directors and chairman of its Development Committee. One 
of the Board's most vital members, he was the type who is all too rare these 
days — he never said no when asked to do anything. Station manager for 
WFIL-TV, Philadelphia, and general sales manager for the Radio and TV 
Division of Triangle Publications Inc., he applied his special talents and con- 
tacts in the interests of his Alma Mater in countless ways — recruiting good 
students for Susquehanna, arranging TV coverage of various events, helping 
secure outstanding campus guests like Efrem Zimbalist Jr. and Stuart Saunders, 
seeing to it that WQSU-FM, the campus radio station, had the best possible 
equipment to initiate broadcasting last year, introducing important people to 
the University, and many more. 

Clyde had come up the hard way. Left motherless in infancy, he was 
raised by a succession of aunts and then his grandfather. He earned his 
way through college, played baseball, football and track. He then became a 
commercial teacher and coach, received his master's degree from the Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, and established a reputation as a specialist in the field of 
consumer education. During World War II he was a lieutenant commander in 
the U.S. Navy. In 1946 he was appointed the first executive director of the 
Philadelphia Junior Chamber of Commerce and he entered the radio and 
television industry in 1951. In civic, professional and philanthropic organiza- 
tions, he held numerous elective and appointive posts. In 1961 he received 
Susquehanna's Alumni Award for Service. 

On July 20, two days after his 53rd birthday, Clyde died suddenly at 
his home in Gladwyne, Pennsylvania, leaving his wife, the former H el e n 
Wentzel '37, and three children — Louise (Mrs. Dennis) Reilly x'67, William 
and Linda. 

The like of Clyde Spitzner does not pass this way often. The University 
family is humbly grateful for his unique contribution and mourns the loss of 
this distinguished alumnus. 



Susquehanna University Alumni Association 

President 

Marlyn R. Fetterolf "23 

Vice Presidents 

Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42 
Dr. Erie I. Shobert II '35 

Recording Secretary 
Dorcthy Turner '36 

Treasurer 

Chester G. Rowe '52 

Historian 

Dr. John J. Houtz '08 

Executive Board Members-at-Large 

Term expires 1969: Dr. Lawrence C. Fisher 
'31, John Yonkondy '36, Ham' W. Butts Jr. 
*48, Dr. Nelson E. Bailey '57, Lynn E. Lerew 
'63. Term expires 1970: Timothy E. Barnes 
'35, Dorothy Eilhardt Gundrum '48, The Rev. 
Dale S. Bringman '48, Dr. James C. Gehris 
'50, Nancy Davis Raab '61 (Mrs. John H. ). 
Term expires 1971: Dr. Bryce E. Nicodemus 
'31, George H. Bantley '41, Shirley A. Young 
'51, William C. Davenport '53, George C. 
Liddington *54. 

Representatives oil the University Board of 
Directors 
Lawrence M. Isaacs '43 
Louise Mehring Koontz '35 

Representative on the Athletic Committee 
Simon B. Rhoads '30 
Jack P. Shipe '40 




ON OUR COVER 

John David Kelley '68, made up for 
his role in the Susquehanna University 
Chancel Players' produetion of "J-B." A 
feature story describing Susquehanna's 
theatre courses and productions begins 
on page 4. 



Ronald E. Berkheimer 
Acting Editor 

Charles H. "Buss" Carr '52 
Director of Alumni Relations 



The SUSQVEHRNM RLUMNUS 



Vol. 37 



SUMMER 1968 



No. 4 



CONTENTS 



Theatre at Susquehanna 
by Charles Price 



Alumni Loyalty Fund Report 



SU Sports 

by Ron Berkheimer 



I Do" 



11 



12 



Susquehannans On Parade 14 



Born Crusaders 18 



Deaths 



18 



& 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Publish- 
ed four times a year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



SUMMER 1968 



Theatre 

at SUSQUEH 



"The play's the thing," exclaims Shakespeare's 
Hamlet, "wherein I'll catch the conscience of the 
king." But to the faculty members of Susquehanna's 
Department of Speech, "the play's the thing," not to 
catch a man's conscience, nor to provide a near-pro- 
fessional evening of theatrical entertainment, but to 
teach the theatre. 

Few college theatre groups are coached from such 
a thoroughly student-orientated philosophy as Dr. 
Bruce L. Nary, Bobert A. Schanke and Larry D. 
Augustine apply to their work at Susquehanna.* 
This emphasis on an academic purpose is evident in 
die whole process of theatre production at the university 
- from the choosing of a play to the lowering of the 
curtain on the final performance. 

Susquehanna has a tradition of college theatre. 
The annual Shakespearean Festival, usually held in 
the spring, dates back to 1949. The 20th anniversary 
of the festival will be observed next year. But, theatre 
could hardly come into its own as long as it was only 
an adjunct to the Department of English. 

Dr. Nary came to the university in the fall of 
1960 as an English professor. Now he heads the new 
Department of Speech, consisting of three faculty 
members and offering two areas of concentration — 
public address and theatre. 

Eastern colleges have been slow to create speech 
departments, although in the Midwest a number of 
them have been in operation for 50 years or more. 
The department at the University of Michigan, where 
Dr. Nary earned both his master's and Ph.D. degrees, 
was established in 1890. Susquehanna's Department 
of Speech came into being in 1966. 

Dr. Nary likes to refer to the plays produced by 
the department as "the laboratory for theatre courses." 



•Although Larry Augustine is qualified to teach theatre 
courses or direct plays, his primary responsibility is the pub- 
lie speaking portion of the curriculum. He also is faculty 
adviser to the university's Forensic Society. 



He explains on the printed program for nearly every 

production: 

"Through rehearsal and performances, 
students receive additional instruction in var- 
ious phases of the arts of the theatre. Educa- 
tional theatre also gives university students 
the opportunity to see plays and know the 
theatre as a performing art." 

It is natural for a faculty member concerned with 
a newly-organized department to be anxious to make 
it attractive to students majoring in the field. So, 
the productions of the Susquehanna University Play- 
ers and the newer Chancel Players are chosen to chal- 
lenge students concentrating in theatre. Some of these 
students are planning careers as actors. Others want 
to teach drama. All, however, have found theatre pro- 
ductions at Susquehanna a demanding thing. From 
last September through the conclusion of the Chancel 
Players' eight day tour in April, there was rarely a 
night when a play was not being planned, rehearsed, 
or performed. The five speech majors (with concen- 
tration in theatre) who graduated in June had little 
time for other pursuits during this seven-and-a-half- 
month period. 

For some years, the Susquehanna University 
Players produced two major plays a year — a Shakes- 
pearean play in the spring, around the time of the 
Bards April 23 birthday, and a modern classic in the 
fall. Last season there was a third major production, 
Archibald MacLeish's Pulitzer Prize winning "J.B.," 
presented by the Chancel Players early in January and 
taken on tour in April. In addition, George Bernard 
Shaw's "Androcles and the Lion" was performed in 
both a children's version and a one - act version for 
adults. 

Such a season reveals part of Dr. Nary's purpose 
— to give students a first-hand acquaintance with clas- 
sical English drama, modern works, religious plays and 
children's productions. lie points out that a very 

SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



N A 



by CHARLES PRICE 




Vic Lazarow as the paunchy, effusive 
Falstujj in "Henry IV, Part I" 



different style of acting is necessary for an audience of 
children. 

The tour, a recent addition to the program, gives 
students the experience of performing in a new situa- 
tion, before diverse audiences and widi different facil- 
ities. Living out of a suitcase is yet another new ex- 
perience for inan\' students. 

Taking a play on tour also accentuates what 
Schanke calls the "ensemble technique" — creating a 
team rather than individual stars. Just before the 
curtain rose for one performance an actor became ill 
and another had to take his place. "The show must 
go on." 

Since the three major productions and the tour 
played to combined audiences of some 4,500 persons, 
the theatre program provided "all college students an 
opportunity to see and appreciate theatre." Moreover, 
about 2,500 high school students and adults had die 
chance to see and appreciate this branch of the per- 
forming arts, at a very modest cost. Tickets were $1 
for high school students and $1.50 for adults. 

Because they believe college theatrical produc- 
tions should be a "laboratory" for coursework, Dr. 
Nary and Schanke limit the casts of all Susquehanna 
plays to students. Many other college or university 
drama groups include faculty members and community 
residents in the interest of a superior performance. 

Insisting on a cast composed entirely of students 
can create problems. The choice of plays for any 
given year is determined by the students available to 
act in them. Last spring it was decided to present 
"The Tragedy of King Lear" during the Shakespearean 
Festival. This seemed an unusual choice for any col- 
lege group. Almost every character in "King Lear" 
is mature. The two principal male roles, Lear and 
Gloucester, are old men. But as Dr. Nary explains: 
"We had four boys with real talent and we chose 'Lear' 
to give each one a challenge." Schanke remarked 
while the play was in rehearsal: "We're probably out 



SUMMER 1968 



of our minds to even attempt 'Lear.' " Most persons 
who saw the production, however, felt that it was 
excellently done. 

Another problem with Shakespeare's plays is that 
they have few female roles. For this reason, the 
women's roles are triple cast, with three actresses re- 
hearsing for each and giving performances on alter- 
nate nights. More women students thus have the 
opportunity to do Shakespeare. 

Theatre productions also are a "laboratory" in the 
off-stage experience they provide. Schanke's classes 
in theatre production construct stage plans, build the 
sets, plan the lighting and sound effects, and help 
to select costumes and apply makeup. One room in 
the basement of the Chapel-Auditorium has been set 
aside as a scenery shop. It is equipped with carpentry 
tools, paint and brushes, glue, etc. A set designer 
is not limited to the color chart of a paint store. He 
mixes his own pigments. The process is more creative 
— and cheaper. 



Lighting and sound are other concerns of the 
students and their faculty directors. Benjamin Apple 
Theatre's limitations in these two respects proved al- 
most a blessing in disguise. Two portable dimmers 
were purchased and became part of the instructional 
equipment. The Department of Physics was brought 
into the act to help install thousands of feet of cable. 
The resulting lighting and sound equipment were to a 
large extent a student creation. Using tape recorders, 
pre-amps, etc., students create sound effects, record 
them, and play them back during performances. Both 
light and sound are controlled from a control booth 
at the rear of the theatre. This allows the operators 
to see the stage, following a modern trend in theatre 
construction. Equipment, props, etc., for the tour 
version of "J-B." completely filled one of the university's 
pickup trucks. 

A costume shop and professional theatre cosmetics 
for makeup also have been added to the instructional 
program. Five women designed and made their own 



A tense scene in the 
Susquehanna University 
Players' production of Arthur 
Millers "The Crucible" 




SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




*Akfi 



Faculty members Nary, 
Schanke and Augustine 



costumes for their roles in "King Lear," thus beginning 
a costume wardrobe that in time may eliminate a 
considerable portion of the expense of rentals. Since 
the costumes rented for "King Lear" cost $862, the 
two newly-purchased sewing machines could soon pay 
for themselves. Costume design begins with research 
to ascertain the style lines of any given historical 
period. After this, sketches are made, materials select- 
ed, patterns drawn, and the finished garment finally 
produced. 

Makeup demands far more skill than any layman 
would expect. Students in the theatre production 
classes hold makeup rehearsals to coach the actors in 
the use of the makeup. Beards, almost an essential 



for Shakespearean plays, are a real challenge. Even 
with professional theatre cosmetics, making a beard is 
a long process. King Lear's beard involved eight 
hours of work and Vic Lazarow '68 found that it took 
him an hour and a half to get it on. In the midst of 
the 15-day run, the beard had to be partially recon- 
structed. 

With students involved in the technical aspects 
of production as well as the acting, a certain amount 
of waste may be inevitable. Material for a set, for 
example, may be cut too small. Schanke feels that 
this is part of the learning process as the risk of error 
is basic to learning. 

Dr. Nary and Schanke feel they need from six 
to eight weeks to prepare any major production. After 
the play has been chosen, it is edited and cut to about 
2,200 lines so that it can be performed in little more 
than two hours, allowing a 10-minute intermission. 
Even this kind of planning shows student concern. 
Dr. Nary has in mind high school students, who come 
to the Shakespearean Festival in groups. Many spend 
an hour or more getting to the theatre. For their 
benefit, performances begin at 8 p.m. rather than the 
more professional 8:30 so that die students are more 
likely to get back to their homes before midnight. 

Two nights are set aside for try-outs. When the 
cast has been selected, the next step is to read the en- 
tire play. This preliminary reading is important be- 
cause the cast needs it to get the feel of the play as a 
whole. They may not go through the entire play 
again for weeks since rehearsals begin with specific 
scenes and acts. 

While the casting is in process, Schanke's produc- 
tion classes are sketching a blueprint of the stage lay- 
out, complete with elevations. 

Then comes the task of "blocking the play" or 
planning the movement. This is primarily a technical 
matter. Dr. Nary creates his own "production prompt 
book" — a sheet of directions following each page of 
script. The sheet lists entrances, exits, and each 
character's movements on stage. In a Shakespearean 
play, this involves the director's own imagination be- 
cause no stage directions written by Shakespeare him- 
self are available. In "King Lear," for example, Dr. 
Nary deliberately had the Fool take the throne after 
Lear in his headstrong folly has disowned Cordelia 



SUMMER 1968 



and banished Kent. Symbolically, we are told that 
the kingship has fled and folly has taken its place. 

Movement is only a part of the director's inter- 
pretation of the play. He also has to plan the exposi- 
tion, the crisis, the resolution. Each character in the 
play must feel that he is acting with reason and justify- 
able motive. This demands the interplay of director 
and actor. Dr. Nary refuses to act out the role so 
that the student can imitate. He insists on the longer 
and slower process of discussion. In this way, the 
student discovers for himself the character he portrays. 
Only then can memorization really begin. 

Deadlines are established and by the final week 
of rehearsal, scripts are used only for discussion. The 
cast, working with sets, lights, costumes and props, 
begins to "play' the production. After each hour of 
rehearsal. Dr. Nary takes time out for a 15-minute 
critique of that portion of the play. In that final week, 
each student learns how to put on his own makeup, 
having had previous instruction in makeup technique. 

Then, when the last dress rehearsal is completed, 
the directors bow out. The play is turned over to the 
student stage manager. While the play runs, Schanke 
and Nary sit in the audience, just as any professional 
director. 

Peter Beiger '64, now pursuing his own acting 
career, has said that he learned from Dr. Nary the 
commitment which the theatre demands. How does 
one get such a commitment from a large cast, many 
of whom have no plans to become actors, or even 
teachers of drama? Dr. Nary admits he has his prob- 
lems. Some freshmen think of a role in a play as a 
form of recreation. They soon learn differently. Like 
the proverbial course of true love, educational theatre 
doesn't always run smooth. Dr. Nary tells of his 
problem when a student quit the cast two weeks be- 
fore an opening. Her costume had already been order- 
ed. There was quite a scurry to find a substitute who 
coulrl not only act the role, but also fit the costume. 

When they were asked whether the Chapel-Aud- 
itorium — with its 1500 seats and a large stage — aids 
in theatre productions, Dr. Nary and Mr. Schanke 
pointed out that it is both a blessing and a problem. 
If Beniamin Apple Theatre is smaller than it would 
need to be, the Chapel-Auditorium is almost too large. 
Anvone seated beyond the mid-point of the auditorium 
can scarcely catch a facial expression. The building 
serves so many purposes, all of which are valuable 
to the r'olleTe community, that sets must be constructed 
on rollers for easy removal. 



Benjamin Apple Theatre also has its problems. Al- 
though it provides an intimate, almost cozy, relation- 
ship between actor and audience, its stage is severelv 
limited. Doors leading to the stage are only 22 inches 
wide. But these limitations are part of the challenge — 
a challenge to both directors and students. Those who 
saw the electric performances of Arthur Miller's 
"Crucible," Thomas Wolfe's "Look Homeward Angel, " 
or Shakespeare's "King Lear" know that the limitations 
can be triumphantly overcome. 

Yet, as any businessman will ask of a laboratorv 
whether it has justified its cost in successful new pro- 
ducts, so educational theatre at Susquehanna can give 
a promising account of itself in its graduates. A refer- 
ence previously was made to Pete Beiger, who values 
highly the training he received at the university. 
Beiger had a substantial part in the 90-minute tele- 
vision production of "The Diary of Anne Frank" and 
for a time played the lead role of "Smitty" in the long- 
running off-Broadway drama, "Fortune in Men's Eyes," 
which later went on tour in Canada and to the West 
Coast. 

Also planning professional acting careers are Mary 
Lee Clukey and Barbara Mundy, both '67, and Vic 
Lazarow. Clukey and Mundy are taking graduate 
studies at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts 
in New York City and Lazarow has been accepted for 
graduate work at the University of Michigan. 

In addition, the theatre program has produced 
several teachers who are doing excellent work. Mrs. 
Frank Keyes (Judith Jantzer) '64, directs theatre in 
the Line Mountain Schools, Mrs. W. Garner Trailer 
(Paula Weiss) '67 teaches English and drama at West 
Pittston High School, and Harry C. Strine III '64 is 
teaching the same subjects at Shamokin High while 
working toward a master's degree from Ohio State 
University. 

Students majoring in speech with a concentration 
in theatre must accumulate 30 credits in speech and 
theatre courses. These courses include Public Speak- 
ing, which deals with the fundamentals and practice 
of speaking before an audience, emphasizing content 
and delivery; Introductory Speech Science, dealing 
with phonetics, voice production and pronunciation; 
Acting; Theatre Production; Directing; and Oral In- 
terpretation, which deals with the techniques of read- 
ing aloud. In addition, six credits (two courses) must 
come from a group of electives which include English 
Drama, Modern Drama, Shakespeare, American Dra- 
matic Theory, and Advanced Oral Interpretation. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



ALUMNI LOYALTY FUND REPORT 



Receipts To Date Below Last Year 



According to the lastest statis- 
tics, Susquehanna's 1 9 6 S Loyalty 
Fund is not faring as well as 
should be expected. Cash and 
pledges received to date arc 
$39,323 - nearly $30, GOO of which 
are still unpaid. Last year at this 
time the total was $48,767, with 
$21,984 remaining to be paid. 

The '67 Fund finallv reached 
$53,457, off from the '66 high of 
$89,432. Granted, two and three 
years ago there were several large 
gifts which did not repeat. But. 



PRESIDENT'S CLUB 

Alvin W. Carpenter '24 
Lawrence C. Fisher '31 
Lawrence M. '43 and Louise Kresge 
Isaacs '45 



UNIVERSITY CLUB 

Paul B. Lucas '28 



CENTURY CLUB 

•William M. Schnure x'99 
"Mervin J. Ross '09 
"John B. Kniseley '13 
"Mary G. Steele 14 
"Phoebe Herman '17 
"Elizabeth Hall Neideigh '17 

Eva P. Herman '18 
"Helen Salem Wescoat '19 

Ellis K. Lecrone '21 

Beatrice Rettinger '23 

Margaret Widlund Blough '24 
"Alma V. McCollougb '24 
"A. Ellsworth Grove '25 
"Lucy Herr Smith '26 
Parke R. Wagner '26 

Charles E. '27 and Dorothy Roth- 
ennel Chaffee '28 

Mary Farlling Hollway '28 
"Essex Botsford Wagner '28 

Helen Ott Soper '28 

Carl G. Smith '28 
"Ray G Sheeler '28 

Harold E. Ditzler '28 
"George A. Hepner '28 
"Gertrude Fisher Jones '29 

Miller R. Gerhardt "30 

Paul M. Bishop '30 

Richard A. Scharfe Jr. '31 
"Laird S. Gemberling '33 
"Grace C. Boyle '33 

D. Edgar and Aberdeen Phillips 
Hutchinson '34 



should not other large gifts re- 
place them? 

Even more important, for sev- 
eral years the Fund was receiving 
contributions from approximately 
1000 persons. At this writing, only 
267 have given in 1968 — indicat- 
ing that more people than usual 
have postponed their giving tins 
year. If you are among these, will 
you think now about helping Sus- 
quehanna regain its fine alumni 
giving records? The monev is 
needed now more than ever. 



"Louise Mehring Koontz '35 
Gustave W. Weber hon'64 
Ralph Witmer '15 



John F. '35 and June Snyder Han- 

na '42 
Frederic C. Billman '36 
"Janet Earhart Harkins '36 
John C. '37 and Marjorie Wolfe 

McCune '43 
"Lester J. Karschner '37 
"Elizabeth Johnston Keil '38 
W. Frank and Isabel Tewkesbury 
Laudenslaver '39 
"Henry J. Keil 39 

"William P. '39 and Hester Bittinger 
Avers '40 
Robert A. Gabrenya '40 
Jack P. Shipe '40 
"Jane Hutchison Kaempfer '41 
"Glenn L. Musser '41 
George A. Cooper '48— Connecti- 
cut General Life Ins. Co. 
James Hazlett '52 
Bruce A. Beli '55 
Deborah Krapf Bell '56 
Arthur A. Zimmerman '57 
Margaret Dalby Zimmerman .59 
James A. '65 and Sally Stephenson 

Gibney '63 
"Hilda Karniol hon'64 
Carles E. Lyle hon'68 
E. Beatrice Herman hon'32 
Margaret Miller Krapf, friend 
"Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Dechert, 
friends 





BOX SCORE 








1968 




Alumni 


Loyalty 


Fund 


Class 


Living Contrib- 
Wembers utors 


Cash 


X 




1 $ 


5.00 


1899 


2 


1 


100.00 


1902 


8 


1 


50.00 


1909 


21 


1 


100.00 


191 1 


10 


1 


2.00 


1913 


13 


3 


177.00 


1914 


17 


2 


105.00 


1915 


25 


3 


527.00 


1917 


29 


4 


207.00 


1918 


23 


3 


130.00 


1919 


29 


2 


50.00* 


1920 


35 


1 


2.50 


1921 


52 


3 


1 60.00 


1922 


43 


3 


75.00 


1923 


37 


1 




1924 


47 


3 


700.00* 


1925 


57 


6 


125.00 


1926 


77 


6 


217.50* 


1927 


86 


2 


12.50* 


1928 


136 


14 


615.00 


1929 


135 


5 


195.00 


1930 


116 


4 


125.00* 


1931 


133 


3 


10.00* 


1932 


98 


1 


20.00 


1933 


86 


4 


280.00 


1934 


85 


2 


100.00 


1935 


76 


3 


60.00* 


1936 


71 


3 


215.00 


1937 


54 


2 


130.00 


1938 


56 


3 


65.00* 


1939 


60 


9 


365.00* 


19-40 


83 


5 


190.00* 


1941 


63 


3 


3 1 0.00* 


1942 


71 


6 


220.00 


1943 


52 


4 


90.00 


1944 


42 


4 


27.50 


1945 


36 


1 


.50 


1947 


65 


5 


140.50 


1948 


89 


7 


247.50 


1949 


132 


6 


94.50 


1950 


143 


9 


152.50 


1951 


90 


7 


135.00 


1952 


108 


10 


270.00 


1953 


105 


4 


45.00 


1954 


119 


6 


62.50 


1955 


78 


3 


117.50 


1956 


106 


8 


187.50 


1957 


103 


4 


1 56.00 


1958 


1 16 


7 


140.00 


1959 


138 


4 


135.00 


1960 


133 


1 


20.00 


1961 


131 


4 


25.00 


1962 


187 


3 


22.50 


1963 


246 


9 


142.50 


1964 


282 


7 


62.50 


1965 


353 


6 


87.50 


1966 


316 


1 


20.00 


1967 


373 


2 


5.00 


Honoraries 


16 


,068.00 


Others 




8 


244.50 


Match 


ng Gifts 7 




'cash 


included in class 


totals) 


-Pledge 


Da id 


?arly and 


included 


in 1967 Fu 
Total Cash a: 


id totals 




of 




7/30/68 


$ 9,607.20 


Unpaic 


Pledg 


es 




as of 7/3C 
TOTALS 


/68 29,715.49 


267 $39,322.69 


President's C 


ub Mem 


bers: 7 


University CI 


ub Mem 


uers: 1 


Century Club 


Membe 


rs: 54 



SUMMER 1968 



HONOR ROLL OF DONORS 



First Report 



Blain Havice 

1899 

"William M. Schnure 

1902 

Maude Reichley Moist, in memory 
of her husband, David Blaine 
Moist '02 

1909 

°Mervyn J. Ross 

1911 

William M, Duck 

1913 

°Ne\vton Kerstetter 

John B. Kniselev 
"Sarah B. Manhart 

1914 

F. C. Ellerman 
"Mary G. Steele 

1915 

Ira C. Gross 
Alice F. Weaver 
Ralph Winner 

1917 

"Phoebe Herman 

P. Kipiiir farrett 
"Elizabeth Hall Neideigh 

Marion Mover Potteiger 

1918 

Lulu Fetterolf Harman 
Eva P. Herman 
Katharine V. Persing 

1919 

Willard D. Allbeck 
"Helen Salem Wescoat 

1920 

Arch A. Aucker 

1921 

Ellis K. Lecrone 
Harry E. Swanger 
Ruth LaRue Thompson 

1922 

"Beatrice Fisher Dunning 
Alma L. Long 
Bessie C. Long 

1923 

Beatrice Rettinger 
1924 

Margaret Widlund Blough 

Alvin W. Carpenter 
"Alma V. McCollough 
19?5 
"Martin M. Enders 

Harland D. Fague 
"A. Ellsworth Grove 

Harry E. Steffen 

Harold E. Stong 

Christie Zimmerman 
1926 

Barbara E. DeRemer 

Sara Hassinger Fague 

Hayes C. Gordon 
"Lucy Herr Smith 

Orren R. Wagner 
"Parke R. Wagner 

19*7 

Charles E. Chaffee 
"Elsie Nace Enders 

1928 

Dorothy Rothermel Chaffee 

Harold E. Ditzler 
"George A. Hep,,, , 

Mary Fariling Hollway 

Grace Williams Keller 

Paul B. Lucas 
"Dorothy W. Pritchard 

Anne D. Sch leffer 
"Ray G. Sheeler 



"Laentena McCahan Shelley 

Carl G. Smith 

Helen Ott Soper 
"Essex Botsford Wagner 

Eleanor O'Donnell Wargny 

1929 

"Helen Simons Barrick 

Ruth G. Beck 
"Gertrude Fisher Jones 

Rebecca C. Puffenberger 
"Katherine P. Reed 

1930 

Paul M. Bishop 
Miller R. Gerhardt 
Paul W. Hartline 
Florence Lauver 

1931 

Lawrence C. Fisher 
Julia Morgan McCloskey 
Richard A. Scharfe Jr. 

1932 

Lee M. and Janet Leitzel 
Fairchild 

1933 

"Grace C. Boyle 
"Laird S. Gemberling 

Harry H. Johnson 
"John A. Schoffstall Sr. 

1934 

D. Edgar and Aberdeen Phillips 
Hutchison 

19*5 

John F. Hanna 
"Louise Mehring Koontz 
"Mary Patterson Yeager 

19'6 

Frederic C. Billman 

"Janet Earhart Harkins 

Eugene D. Mitchell 

1937 

"Lester J. Karschner 
John C. McCune 

19=!8 

"Elizabeth Johnston Keil 
Charles J. Stauffer 
Elizabeth Fry Vogel 

1939 

"William P. Ayers 

Robert M. Bastress 
"Jean Beamenderfer 
"Henry J. Keil 

W. Frank and Isabel Tewkesbury 
Laudenslayer '39 
°M. Jane Schnure 

Shirley Finkbeiner Stehlin 

Eleanor Saveri Wise 

1940 

"Hester Bittfnger Ayers 

Robert A. Gabrenya 

Jack P. Shipe 
"Barrier S. Swartz 

Eugene F. Williams 

1941 

"Jane Hutchison Kaempfer 
"Glenn L. Musser 
Paul C. Shatto 

1942 

Sovilla Rowe Gargie 

June Snyder Hanna 

Martin W. Hopkins 

Edward S. and Blanche Forney 

Rogers 
B. Mary Shipe 

1943 

Herbert H. Holderman 
Marjorie Wolf McCune 
"Donald F. and Ruth Billow 
Spooner 

1944 

K-tharinc Heldt Aucker 
William A. Jr. and Margaret 
Genmiill Janson 
"Janet Hoke Reiff 



1945 

John J. Kocsis 

1947 

"William E.Bomgardner 

Mary' Lizzio Govekar 

Hilda Markey Kocsis 
"Nancy Mvers Landis 

Adah A. Wolfe 

1948 

Russell F. Brown 

George A. Cooper 

Alovsius V. Derr 
•H. Lee Hebel 

Charles L. and Eleanor Steele 
Lady 
"Augustus V. Tietbohl 

1949 

Harriet MacNamara Bowen 
Phyllis Swartz Derr 
Millard G. Fisher 
"Edith Wegner Hebel 
James B. Reilly 
Eriua Bonawitz Wames 

1950 

|. Iin B. Doran 
Charles H. Grand 
Roger C. Howling 
Everett M. and Jeanne Kahler 
Manning 
"Vernon J. Miller 
A. B. Portzline Jr. 
Janet Wolf Statler 
Donald E. Wissinger 

1951 

Herbert O. Bollinger 
Alice Yonghaus Davenport 
Lois Seybrecht Grand 
"Jeanne Attingcr Hassinger 
Grace McKeever Newman 
Marilyn Beers Reilly 
Flora Barnhart Wissinger 

1952 

Charles H. and Voylet Dietz Carr 

James Hazlett 

Bernice Jochem Howling 
"Barbara Easton Johns 

JoAnn Alexander McAllister 
"James W. Morris 

Kathleen Schnerr Price 
"Lois Renfer 
•David G. Volk 

1953 

Edward P. Kopf 
"Beatrice Morrow Myers 
Marvel Cowling Robinson 
Gininar Zorn 

1951 

William F. Delbaugh 
Faye Kostenbauder 
"Graydon I. Loss 
Stanley S. and Patricia Hess 

Manning 
Barbara Morris Zorn 

1955 

Walter C. Albert Jr. 

Brace A. Bell 

Annabelle Thomas Rogers 

1956 

Claire Rosengarten Albert 

Deborah Krapf Bell 

John C. and Charlotte Meerbach 

Bunke 
Carol Dauberman Chidsey 
Robert L. Hackenberg 
Clyde R. Kauffman 
Joanne Mummert Spangler 

1957 

Nelson E. Bailey 

Jack K. Bishop 

George F. Schluchterer III 

Arthur A. Zimmerman 

1958 

William R. and Carolann Zust 
Asp ray 



Wayne M. and Janet Gordon Rutz 
Mary Moore Schatkowski 
Janis Quigley Schluchterer 
°James W. Wright 

1959 

"John T. Baskin 
"Donald L. Middlesworth 
"Susan Lehman Northrup 
Margaret Dalby Zimmerman 

I960 

"Larry A. Wingard 

1961 

*Louis R. and Margaret Webb 
Coons 
Janice Conway Niemann 
Nancy Reeser Ryan 

1962 

"Maria Wernikowski MacFarlan 
"John H. Spillman 
Susan Sload Thompson 

1963 

Curtis W. Barry 

Jay S. Benuan 
"Robert W. Curtis 

Sally Stephenson Gibney 
"Elwiiod B. Hippie Jr. 

Carl M. Mover 
"Linda Leach Spillman 
•H. Nathan Ward 

Janet H. White 

1964 

Dianne Stauffer Gimbi 
Richard E. Howe Jr. 
Grace Simington Karschner 
Patricia Taylor Schmidt 
Richard A. and Susan Chapman 
Seaks 
"James M. Wilde 

1965 

John M. Brokenshire 

James A. Gibney 

Richard S. Karschner 
"Aurelie Toconita Laurence 
"Nancy Burns Shilling 

Elizabeth Bunting Strong 

1966 

Peter C. Friedman 

1967 

Richard R. Jr. and Rosemary 
Robinson Hough 

Honoraries 

"Fiances Dimlap Alterman hon'65 
George H. Berkheimer hc'5 1 
Joseph S. Clurk hc'61 
Paul W. DeLauter hc'56 
Gynith Giffin hon'67 
Irvin Gray bill Jr. hon'67 
E. Beatrice Herman hon*32 

"Hilda Karniol hon*64 

"Charles Leese hon'37 
Charles E. Lyle hon*68 
Otto Reimherr hnn'67 

"Wilbelm Reuning hon'67 
Catherine E. Steltz hon*68 
Cedric W. Tilberg hc'63 
Gustave W. Weber hon'64 

"J. Gould Wickey hon'30 

Orhers 

"Mr. and Mrs. G. Rudolph Dechert 
Mi. and Mrs. Roger H. Johnson 
Margaret Miller Krapf 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Shields 
Centre-Union S.U. Alumni Club 

Matchinq Gifts 

Ford Co. 
Hershev Fund 
IBM Corp. 
Ji hnson & Johnson 
The New York Times Foundation 
Westinghouse Educational Foun- 
dation 
W. T. Grant Co. 

"For purpose other thin 
capital campaign 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



su 



SPORTS 



by RON BERKHEIMER 



The Father and Son coaching combination of 
Amos Alonzo Stagg Sr. and Jr. is now in the university's 
Sports Hall of Fame. The Staggs and H. Donald 
Sweeley '21 were named to the Hall of Fame recently 
by a five-man committee appointed by the Athletic 
Committee. 

They were the first choices made under the per- 
manent selection procedures, which provide for the 
naming of a maximum of three new members each 
year. The Hall of Fame was established in 1967 as 
part of the observance of the 75th anniversary of foot- 
ball at the university. Twenty-eight former gridiron 
greats were picked then as charter members, but 
former athletes and coaches from all sports played 
by Susquehanna are eligible now. 

The Staggs were football co-coaches at Susque- 
hanna from 1947 to 1952 and had an undefeated sea- 
son in '51. A. A. Stagg Jr., now vice president of a 
Chicago investment firm, spent 26 years at the uni- 
versity, many of them as athletic director and football 
and basketball coach. "Deacon" Sweeley, a retired 
high school teacher and coach, excelled in and cap- 
tained S.U. teams in football, basketball, and baseball. 

Amos Alonzo Stagg Sr., who died in March of 
1965, was a football immortal when he came to Sus- 
quehanna. A graduate of Yale University, he had 
been named as an end to Walter Camp's first All- 
America team in 1889. He had coached for 41 years 
at the University of Chicago and for 15 at College of 
the Pacific, where in 1943 at the age of 81 he was 
named Coach of the Year. Tiny C. of P. had lost only 
to undefeated and untied Southern Cal that year in 
a 6-0 game. Two College of the Pacific touchdowns 
were nullified by penalties. 

In addition, Stagg had helped form the Big 10 
Conference in 1905, served on the NCAA rules com- 
mittee for many years, and pioneered in the develop- 
ment of such football tactics as double wingback and 
spread punt formations, the "lonesome end," and 
single and double flankers. 

At Susquehanna, he served as offensive coach and 
his son directed the defense. He passed Iris 90th 
birthday during these years, but was still in excellent 
physical condition and sometimes jogged ahead of 
his players around the university's quarter-mile track. 




Hall of Famers A. A. Stagg Sr. and Jr. 



His wife, Stella, also had a great knowledge of the 
game and often diagrammed plays on the sidelines 
or scouted opponents. When she became ill in 1953, 
he decided not to make the long trip from their home 
in Stockton, Calif., to Selinsgrove. He closed his 
career with seven more seasons as an advisory coach 
at Stockton Junior College, finally retiring in 1960 at 
the age of 98. 

Stagg, however, was as famous for his admirable 
character and beliefs as he was for his coaching skills. 
He opposed excessive football recruiting and the "win 
at any price" philosophy, insisted on following both 
the letter and the spirit of the rules, did not drink or 
smoke and was an inspiration to the thousands of 
young men he coached. No account of Iris life, how- 
ever brief, should omit reference to this. 

A. A. Stagg Jr. came to Susquehanna in 1935 
and remained until 1961. He was football coach for 
17 years and had another undefeated team in 1940. 
He also coached basketball, track and tennis at times, 
directed an extensive intra-mural program, and taught 
phvsical education and health. Honored with profes- 
sor emeritus status, he still maintains an interest in 
the university and returns to campus occasionally. 

The younger Stagg earned the Ph.B. and M.A. 
degrees at the University of Chicago and the M.A. 



SUMMER 1968 



11 



from Columbia. He played football at Chicago under 
his father and was an outstanding tennis player. Be- 
fore coming to S.U., he also spent 12 years on the 
coaching staff at Chicago. 

Sweeley was a football halfback and quarterback, 
basketball center and forward, and baseball shortstop. 
He enrolled at Susquehanna in 1916 and as a fresh- 
man scored the winning touchdown in a 10-9 victory 
over Bucknell. The Crusaders then played such na- 
tional football powers 
as Penn State, Fordham, 
Colgate and Syracuse. 
Another highlight of 
Sweeley s college career 
was playing in the 1920 
game in which S.U. held 
Colgate to a scoreless 
tie. 

Following his grad- 
uation, he began a high- 
ly-successful high school 
coaching career in Illin- 
ois. He coached briefly 
at Westfield and Casey, 
remained at Georgetown 
from 1924 until 1935, 

and then went to Paris High School where he stayed 
until he retired from coaching in 1963. At George- 
town he had a 71-13-11 record in football and coached 
a basketball team which won a district championship 
game by a 1-0 score. The game later was mentioned 
in Ripley's "Believe It or Not." 




'Deac" Sweeleij 



He also had great success at Paris, winning the 
Eastern Illinois League football championship in 1937, 
1938 and 1939. During a banquet given for him when 
he retired, these years were referred to as the "Knute 
Rockne Era" of Paris football. Sweeley and his wife, 
the parents of four grown children, still live in Paris. 

© a o 

Some 65 to 70 athletes are expected to report to 
the university Aug. 31 for pre-season football practice. 
The Crusaders open Sept. 21 in a night game with 
Otterbein and play their first home game at 1:30 p.m. 
Sept. 28 with Western Maryland. 

Susquehanna will have a young team this season. 
There are only six seniors on the squad. Five sopho- 
mores — tackles Joe Dambrocia and Tom Lyons, tight 
end Whitney Gay, split end Bruce Bengtson, and half- 
back Dennis Simmons — are expected to win starting 
berths on the offensive unit. A number of other sophs 
and several freshmen will see considerable varsity 
action. 

"We were pleased with the hitting and the at- 
titude shown during spring practice," coach Jim Hazlett 
said. "I'm sure we will have a better team this year." 

Another reason for Hazlett's optimism is a more 
favorable schedule. Gone are Waynesburg, Witten- 
berg and Findlay. All three defeated Susquehanna by 
one-sided scores last fall. 

The new schedule, with six Middle Atlantic Con- 
ference games, makes the Crusaders eligible for the 
Northern College Division title for the first time since 
1S62. 



< t 



I Do" 



BURBANK- DAVIS 
Arline May Davis '68 to Russell Bur- 
bank, January 28, Doylestown ( Pa. ) 
Presbyterian Church. Martha Pape '66 
served as maid of honor. Arline and 
her husband both attended Goethe In- 
stitute, Kochel, West Germany, until 
this past June. They have been touring 
Europe this summer. Mr. Burbank will 
take graduate studies in the fall at the 
Institute of Foreign Trade, Phoenix, 
Ariz. 

JOHN - HIGLEY 
L o a i s e Wadsworth Higleij x'67 to 
Walter Weinhagen John, May 18. Louise 
is a graduate of the Westover School in 



Middlebury, Vt, and Bennett Junior 
College. Her husband studied at Michi- 
gan State University and Columbia 
University's Graduate School of Business. 
He is a management consultant in tire 
New York office of Lybrand, Ross 
Erothers and Montgomery. 

WOLF - CURTIS 
Anne Louise Curtis to Richard Scott 
Wolf '67, June 1, Second United Church 
of Christ, Harrisburg, Pa. Dick is em- 
ployed as a chemist with the Armstrong 
Cork Co. The couple is residing at 3001 
N. Fourth St., Harrisburg. 17110. 

REED - DOWNIN 
Ronald 8. Reed '66 to Gloria S. 
Downin, June 2, The Church of the 
Abiding Presence at the Lutheran The- 
ological Seminary, Gettysburg, Pa. 
David Ei/stcr '66 served as best man. 



Mrs. Reed will enter her senior year at 
Wilson College this fall. Ron is a stu- 
dent at Gettysburg Seminary. Tire 
couple will move to McConnellsburg, 
Pa. in September, where Ron will com- 
plete a cne-year internship at St. Paul's 
Lutheran Church. 

LYNCH- CAPON ITI 
Jeanne Caponiti to Jerome E. Lynch 
'68. Jerome is a science teacher at 
Montgomery Mills Junior High School, 
Montgomery County, Md. The couple 
lives at 505 Fleetwood St., Silver Spring, 
Md. 20910. 

GLASER - LaRUE 
Suzanne LaRue to //. Donald Glaser 
Jr. '68, June 4. Mrs. Glaser is a 1968 
graduate of the Barnes Hospital School 
( f Nursing. Don is pursuing graduate 
Study at Kent State University. Address: 



tt 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



5047 Waterman Blvd.. St. Louis, Mo. 
63110. 

WEAVER - HEINTZELMAN 
Susan V. Heintzelman v'6'9 to A. 
Michael Weaver '68. June 5. Michael is 
employed in the Process Control Depart- 
ment of the Owens-Corning Fiberglass 
Corp. The couple resides at 215 Ninth 
St.. Huntingdon, Pa. 16652. 

EWIG - BERKEV 
Bonnie Gave Berkey to Ray Henry 
EiLig '68, June 8, Trinity Lutheran 
Church, Selinsgrove. Barbara Fuhner 
x'68 served as maid of honor, Voylet 
Dietz Cart '52 as organist, and Charles 
H. "Buss" Carr '52 as soloist. Bonnie 
wis employed as a secretary at S.U. Ray 
is an accountant for Ernst & Ernst in 
Buffalo, N. Y. Address: Sir Thomas 
Courts, 2360 Calvin Ext., Tonawanda, 
N.Y. 14150. 

KELLOGG - Z1ESCH 
Nancy Elaine Zieseh '68 to Richard 
Alan Kellogg '68, June 8. Address: 215 
East Dudlej Ave., Westfield, X.J. 07090. 

RAPP - LAWRENCE 
Elizabeth Margaret Lawrence to Ken- 
neth I. Rapp '66, June 15, Beaver Mem- 
orial Methodist Church, Lcwisburg. Pa. 
Richard E. Talbot '68 served as an usher 
and Robert MeNally '33 was organist. 
Mrs. Rapp is a graduate of Mansfield 
State College and taught first grade in 
the North Ward School, Lewisburg. Ken 
is in the Army. The couple is living in 
Hanau, Germany. Address: Pfc. Kenneth 
I. Rapp US 52812144, H Co 23rd 
Engrs., Brig. (ADM), A. P. O. New 
York, N.Y. 09165. 

VAX XAME - ORTH 
Margaret C. Orth '66 to Denim L. 
Van Name '68, June 15. Margaret taught 
vocal and string music at Mifflinburg 
(Pa.) Junior-Senior High School. Dennis 
is a management trainee for the New 
Jersey Rivet Co. Address: Imperial 
II mse, Apt. =203, 35 White Horse Pike, 
Audubon, N.J. 08106. 

RUXVAX - BECKMAN 
Faye Clara Beckman to Joseph S. Run- 
yan II x'69, June 18, Trinity Lutheran 
Church, Milton, Pa. The ceremony was 
performed by the Rev. Walter L. Bran- 
dau '51. Dav'd Von Gundcn '69 was 
the best man. Mrs. Runyan is employed 
at the Evangelical Home, Lewisburg. 
Joe is in the Navy. 

HALLMAN - LAUBACH 
Patrieia Louise Laubach '66 to Donald 
L. Hallman, June IS. Patricia is teach- 
ing vocal elementary music in the Upper 
Mcrion School District, King of Prussia, 

SUMMER 1968 



Pa. The couple is living at 233 Summit 
Ave., Fort Washington, Pa. 10934. 

EVANS - HAMOR 

Saucy Aline Humor '64i to Robert P. 
Evans, June 22. Address: Box 36, Kill- 
ington, \'t. 05751. 

DUXKELBERGER - KARELIS 
Ruta Karelis to Dr. Fred B. Dunkel- 
berger '63, June 22, Latvian Lutheran 
Church, Quakertown. Pa. Mrs. Dunkel- 
berger was graduated from the Moore 
College of Art and was employed by 
Kabana Associates Advertising Art Study, 
Philadelphia. Fred is serving his second 
year residency in periodontics at the 
Eastman Dental Center, Rochester, N.Y., 
and also is pursuing graduate study in 
physiology at the University of Rochester. 
Address: 148 College Complex Circle. 
Apt. 5, Rochester. N.Y. 14623. 

WARD -SUMMER 
Carole Lee Summer '63 to H. Nathan 
Ward '63. June 22. First Moravian 
Church. Riverside, X.J. Margaret Oelk- 
ers Talbot '66 served as matron of honor, 
Linda laeger '69 as maid of honor, and 
Nancy Nelson Ccme '66 as one of the 
bridesmaids. Among the ushers were 
Carl Moyer, Steven Gettier, and David 
Hackenberg, all '63. Robert Snyder '67 
served as organist and Robert Summer 
HI '63 as soloist. Carole had been teach- 
ing music in the Pennsauken (X.J.) 
Public Schools. Xate earned the master 
of education degree from Pennsylvania 
State University and is band director 
at Allen Junior High School, Lemoyne, 
Pa. He is als > instrumental music in- 
structor for the West Shore Joint School 
System and gives private lessons. The 
couple resides at 307 E. Cresrwood Dr., 
Camp Hill, Pa. 17011. 

MIXER -MILLER 

Trudy Jean Miller '68 to Gary T. Min- 
er '69, June 29. James Reaser '68 served 
as organist and Barbara Ballard '69 as 
soloist. Trixanna Weber '68 and Linda 
Garher '69 were bridesmaids. Jeffrey 
Mattis and Erik VanAnglen, both '69, 
were ushers. Trudy will be teaching 
in the West Beaver Elementary School, 
McClure, Pa., in the fall. Gary will re- 
turn to S.U. f:r his senior year. Address: 
Center Ave., E?aver Springs, Pa. 17812. 

EELLETTI - SHAW 
Leanne Shaw '66 to Ronald J. Belletti. 
July 6, Methodist Church Oonshohocken, 
Pa. Mr. Belletti was graduated from 
Lehigh University in 1964. He and Le- 
anne are members of the audit staff of 
Haskins & Sells, certified public account- 
ants, in Philadelphia, Pa. The couple 



lives at 317 Whitemarsh Apts., Lafayette 
Hill, Pa. 19444. 

ROBBIXS - HAYES 
Mary Ruth Hayes to Christopher 
Starkey Bobbins '68, July 14, St. Michael 
the Archangel Church, Sunbury, Pa. 
Ushers were Paul Britt, Michael Faust, 
and Thomas Milbrand, all '68. Mrs. 
Robbins had been employed as an oper- 
ator by the Bell Telephone Co. Chris 
is a management trainee for Roadway 
Express, Inc., Allentown, Pa. Address: 
Valley View Apts., S. 15th and Elm 
Sts., Allentown. 18102. 

JOXES - ZECHLER 
Sherry Grace Zechler to Edward L. 
Jones '61, July 19. Ed was graduated 
in May of 1967 from the Conservative 
Baptist Theological Seminary and is pre- 
sently working in Denver, Colo., teach- 
ing and counseling high school dropouts. 
His wife is an honors graduate of 
U.C.L.A. and a former airline hostess. 
She is now employed by the Denver 
Youth for Christ. Address, P. O. Box 
14093, Denver, Colo. 80214. 

VOOEL- WORRELL 
Eile e n Worrell '67 to William A. 
Vogel '65. August 10, Chapel of the 
Methodist Home, Cornwall, Pa. Katli- 
leen Sitnmers Andrews '67 was matron 
of honor and Charles W. Borgerding Jr. 
'65 was best man. Bill teaches mentally 
retarded children for the Parkland 
School District, Allentown, Pa. Address: 
816 Valley View Apartments, Allentown 
18102. 





1968 




SUSQUEHANNA 




Fall Sports Schedule 






FOOTBALL 




S 21 


Otterbein 


A 


S 28 


Western Maryland 


11 


O 4 


Bloom sburg 


A 


12 


Ithaca 


A 


O 19 


Upsala, Homecoming 


11 


26 


Lycoming 


A 


N 2 


Juniata, Parents Day- 


11 


N 9 


Wagner 


A 


N16 


Delaware Valley 
SOCCER 


H 


O 2 


Elizabethtown 


H 


O 5 


Drew 


H 


O 9 


Dickinson 


II 


O 12 


Messiah 


A 


16 


Franklin & Marshall 


H 


18 


Wagner 


A 


22 


Lycoming 


A 


26 


Upsala 


A 


N 2 


Gettysburg 


H 


N 7 


Philadelphia Textile 


A 


N 9 


Wilkes 


A 


N16 


Bucknell 


II 



Susquehannans 
On Parade 



Jennie E. Anderson has retired after 
teaching 41 years in elementary schools 
in Shamokin Dam and Hummels Wharf, 
Pa. Miss Anderson also played the organ 
at the United Methodist Church of Sha- 
mokin Dam for 35 years and is a former 
leader of the Girl Scout troop at the 
church. 

Clarence Weaver, a teacher in the 
Sunbury (Pa.) schools since 1946, was 
honored this spring when the 1968 Pro- 
file, Shikellamy High School yearbook, 
was dedicated to him. 

x'99 

William M. Schnure's health has not 
been good and he is unable to walk 
around the campus as he has done so 
often. A card or a note from old friends 
is good company. His address: The 
Doctors' Nursing Home, Selinsgrove 
17870. 





CROSS COUNTRY 




S 28 


King's & Millersville 


H 


O10 


Bloomsburg 


H 


012 


Gettysburg 


A 


16 


Elizabethtown 


A 


19 


Dickinson 


H 


22 


Lebanon Vallej 


A 


26 


Lycoming 


A 


31 


Delaware Valley 


A 


N 2 


Juniata 


H 


N16 


Scranton 


H 


N22 


MAC Championships 


A 


WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY 


O 3 


Bucknell 


A 


O 5 


Lancaster Club 


A 


O10 


Wilkes 


H 


O 16 


Lock Haven 


H 


22 


Dickinson 


A 


24 


Shippensburg 


H 


G-31 


Penn State 


H 


N 6 


Lebanon Valle) 
JV FOOTBALL 


A 


O 8 


Stevens 1 i 


H 


21 


Lycoming 


H 


29 


Western Maryland 


A 


N 4 


Johns Hopkins 


H 


N 11 


Bucknell 

JV SOCCER 


A 


23 


Bucknell 


A 


O30 


Dickinson 


II 



'07 

Mary Esther Burns, M.D. received a 
gold pin marking the 50th anniversary 
of her graduation from The Women's 
Medical College of Pennsylvania at the 
ci liege's 1 16th Commencement exercises 
in Philadelphia. Dr. Burns was a phy- 
sician in the Bronxville, N.V. area, but 
is retired now and lives in Selinsgrove. 

'11 

Dr. Miles R. Derk, former state sen- 
ator, was honored at the ceremonial 
ground breaking for the last segment of 
the Keystone Shortway, which took place 
near the Clinton County community of 
Carroll, Pa., site of the Jersey Shore in- 
terchange. Dr. Derk was cited for being 
the co-sponsor cf a bill, introduced in 
the Legislature in 1955, which led to the 
construction of the Shortway. 



'15 



Ralph Witmer attended a reunion in 
Boston of the Army Ambulance units 
which served in Europe during World 
War I. 

Drs. Lester G. Shannon and John F. 
Harkins, were honored for their 50th 
anniversary in the ministry at the 
annual convention of the Central Penn- 
sylvania Synod, Lutheran Church 
in America, at Gettysburg College. Each 
received an ovation and a scroll of 
achievement from the delegates at the 
convention. Dr. Shannon, husband of 
the former Susan Geise 'IS, is vice pas- 
tor of Zion Lutheran Church, Sunbury. 
Dr. Harkins, retired, lives in State Col- 
lege, Pa. His wife is the former Man/ 
Wagner '16. 

'17 

Phoebe Herman, regent, welcomed 
members of the Conrad Weiser Chapter, 
Daughters of the American Revolution, 
at a luncheon in May, celebrating the 
70th anniversary of the chapter. Eva 
Herman '18 and Helen Swope Ranck '31, 



14 



past regents, received recognition. Mrs. 
Ranck is presently serving as registrar 
and Miss Eva Herman is the chapter 
historian. Flora Burnhart Wissinger '51 
was the accompanist for the soloist, Mrs. 
Kenneth Fladmark. 

'21 

Ellis K. Lecrone and his wife recently 
sold their home in Wilmington, Del. and 
now live permanently in Florida, where 
they have spent the past three winters. 
Their address is 5817 - 21 Ave. South, 
St. Petersburg 33707. 

x'22 

H. Roy Smoltz, in addition to holding 
the office as treasurer for the Susque- 
hanna Valley Area Council, Boy Scouts 
of America, has been named to the Re- 
ligious Awards Committee. 

'23 

Lynne O. Ramer has been named an 
honorary submariner on the U.S. Navy's 
smallest submarine, USSXI. One of his 
twin sons, David, served on submarines 
for 14 years. David has been injured in 
an automobile accident and is expected 
to be at the National Naval Medical 
Center, Bethesda, Md., for at least one 
year. 

'24 

Lottie Brosius Kepner, widow of Dr. 
/. Wilson Kepner '24, has won numerous 
prizes in poetry contests and her poems 
have appeared in many newspapers and 
magazines. Mrs. Kepner served as a 
columnist for the Maryland Gazette, 
feature writer for the Brooklyn News, 
taught school in Lewistown and East 
Lewisburg, Pa., and has done substitute 
teaching in the Baltimore public schools. 



'25 



Dr. Roger M. Blough, chairman of the 
board and chief executive officer of U.S. 

Steel, lias been elected to the board of 
directors of the Campbell Soup Go. 

SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



W. Earl Thomas, superintendent of 
the Union County ( Pa. ) School District 
has announced that he will retire in 
January. Mr. Thomas taught school in 
Middleburg and Mifflinburg, Pa., and 
became chief administrator at Mifflinburg 
in 1930, holding the latter post until he 
became county superintendent in 1954. 

'27 

Mary E. Bowersox, business teacher 
and chairman cf the business depart- 
ment at Middleburg ( Pa. ) Joint Higli 
School for the past 31 years, has re- 
tired after 45 years of teaching. Miss 
Bowersox is a licensed insurance broker 
and expects to continue operating the 
H. A. Bowersox Insurance Agency. 

'28 

The Rev. Harold F. Dodder, pastor 
of St. Peter's Lutheran Church, Lafayette 
Hill, Pa. since 1941, was presented with 
the Distinguished Service Award by the 
VVhitemarsh - Plymouth Junior Chamber 
of Commerce. The award highlighted a 
career of service spanning more than a 
quarter of a century in Whitemarsh 
Township. The Jaycees cited Pastor 
Doebler for his "outstanding service, 
leadership and devotion to the commun- 
ity," and noted that under his leader- 
ship the church has enjoyed "unprece- 
dented growth and community involve- 
ment." Pastor Doebler resigned from 
St. Peter's, as of June 2, and said he 
now plans to seek a pastorate in a 
mountain or rural parish. 

Miss Clair E. Scholdn, a former 

supervising principal, was presented with 
the Alumnus of the Year award at the 
7()th annual meeting of the Northumber- 
land (Pa.) Area High School Alumni 
Association. Miss Scholvin is the second 
recipient of the award, which was pre- 
sented last year for the first time. 

'29 

Paul H. Aumiller and his wife, the 
former Beatrice Shively '34, observed 
their 25th wedding anniversary June 
4. Mr. Aumiller served in World Wars 
I and II and recently retired from his 
position as revenue agent for the Selins- 
grove State School and Hospital, where 
Mrs. Aumiller serves as a music in- 
structor. 

Dr. Harold N. Moldenke was the re- 
cipient of the Gold Medal, the highest 
honor betowed by the Garden Club of 
New Jersey. The inscription reads: "For 
bringing the wonders of our natural 
world to many people, especially 
children." Dr. Moldenke is an associate 



professor in the department of science, 
Paterson State College, and co - editor 
and publisher of "Phytologia," a nature 
publication. He is a former curator of 
die New York Botanical Garden and a 
former director of Trailside Nature and 
Science Center, Watchung, N.J. 

x # 29 

Wtimer G. Hackenberg was elected 
administrative vice president of the Tri- 
County National Bank of Middleburg, 
Pa. Mr. Hackenberg began his banking 
career after serving in World War II 
widi the Army Medical Administrative 
Corps. 

'31 

Ira G. Sassaman, director of parish 
education for the Central Pennsylvania 
Synod, Lutheran Church in America, 
was awarded the honorary degree of 
doctor cf humane letters by Gettysburg 
College at Commencement exercises 
June 2. 

x'31 

Arnold Michaels, president of Grodins, 
retailers of men's clothing, negotiated 
the purchase of the 11-store Mullen and 
Bluett chain in Southern California. Mr. 
Michaels resides in Kentfield, Calif., with 
his wife, Lillian, who supervises the 
decorating and buying of antiques for 
Grodins. Acquisition of the Mullen and 
Bluett chain makes Grodins the nation's 
largest independent menswear retailer, 
with annual sales, including the opera- 
tion of a knitwear subsidiary, of more 
than $20 million. 

'33 

Charles Coleman made his last formal 
appearance as conductor of the Shikel- 
lamy Senior High School Band at the an- 
nual Spring Choral and Band Concert. 
After the concert, Mr. Coleman was 
presented with a $500 savings bond and 
a baton at a surprise reception. During 
the coming academic year, he will con- 
fine his duties to supervision of the mus- 
ical program for the entire Shikellamy 
( Sunbury-Northumberland, Pa. ) district. 

Bruce F. Worthington is teaching 
chemistry at Brevard Junior College, 
near Cape Kennedy. He has been in 
Florida for the past five years and pre- 
viously taught for 30 years in New- 
York state. His wife is the former 
Marian Walborn '33. 

'35 

Russell W. Eisenhower, superintendent 
of Northumberland County ( Pa. ) 



schools, attended the 106th convention 
of the National Education Association 
at Dallas, Tex., in July. 

'36 

Eugene Mitchell served as guest con- 
ductor for the annual spring concert of 
the Junior and Senior Bands at West 
Snyder High School. Mr. Mitchell is the 
postmaster of Beaver Springs, Pa., and 
also gives private music lessons. 

The Rev. Ralph I. Shockey, S.T.M., 
pastor - superintendent of the Lutheran 
Home at Moorestown, N.J., was among 
those present as a Hag, which had flown 
over the capital in Washington, was 
raised in observance of the home's 20th 
anniversary. 

'37 

Dr. B. Henry Shafer, supervising prin- 
cipal of the Wyomissing ( Pa. ) School 
District, submitted his resignation in 
May, upon his appointment as director 
of secondary education at Kutztown 
(Pa.) State College. 

'38 

The Rev. James B. Diffenderfer, for- 
mer pastor of Trinity Evangelical Luth- 
eran Church, Fairless Hills, Pa., accepted 
the pastorate of Christ Lutheran Church 
in Allentown, Pa. in February. Pastor 
Diffenderfer also is certified as a pro- 
fessional hospital chaplain by the Amer- 
ican Hospital Association. 

'39 

Henry J. Keit, head of Henry Keil & 
Sons, Fair\iew, X.J., is the new president 
ul (he 900-member Fuel Merchants As- 
sociation of New Jersey. Mr. Keil was 
head football coach at Susquehanna dur- 
ing the 1955 through '59 seasons. His 
wife is the former Elizabeth Johnston 
'38. 

Jess M. Kemberling, chairman of 
Dutch Pantry, Inc., a restaurant chain, 
announced that the Corn Products Com- 
pany has acquired an interest in Dutch 
Pantry. Kemberling said the affiliation 
makes available to the Dutch Pantry 
"marketing, research, and manufacturing 
skills, developed through the operation 
of over 100 plants and 12 research cen- 
ters throughout die free world." 

'40 

E d u a r d Eisenhart, coordinator of 
history courses for Uie Basking Ridge 
(N.J.) schools, is one of 25 school social 
science chairmen from various parts of 
the United States who attended a two- 
month seminar at the India International 
Center in New Delhi. 



SUMMER 1968 



15 



Dr. Paul M. Orso and the Rev. /. Leon 
Haines have been elected president and 
tary, respectively, of the Maryland 
Synod, Lutheran Church in America. Dr. 
Orso lias served for 16 years as executive 
director of Lutheran Social Services of 
the National Capital Area and recently 
was elected vice president of the Tressler 
Lutheran Home for Children. 



'42 

Mildred Bittner, counselor at Selins- 
grove Area Joint High School, and 
several of her friends, motored to Nova 
Scotia, Cape Breton Island, Prince Ed- 
ward Island and New Brunswick. They 
returned through the New England 
states. 

S a v i 1 1 a Roue Gargie, elementary 
teacher in the Selinsgrove Area School 
District, is one of the five teachers who 
have developed a six-week summer pro- 
gram, supported this year through a 
Federal grant. The program combines 
group discussions in which there are 
no more :.han five students per teacher 
with field trips to industrial plants, zoos, 
museums, hospitals, etc. Pictures, tapes, 
films, and reading materials also are used 
and the teaching team will follow up the 
experiment with a report on the value 
of the experience to the children, to- 
gether with recommendations for future 
programs. 

'49 

Robert L. Dornsife was appointed di- 
rector of development for United Cere- 
bral Palsy of Western Pennsylvania, Inc., 
which operates a center in Spring 
Church, Kiski Township. Mr. Dornsife 
will be responsible for developing serv- 
ices in counties where there are no 
UCP affiliates. His wife is the former 
Margaret Williams '49. 

'52 

The Rev. Wayne Lupolt, pastor of St. 
Luke's Lutheran Church, Sunbury, serv- 
ed as a delegate to the biennial conven- 
tion of the Lutheran Church in America 
at Atlanta, Ga. in July. The convention 
elected Dr. Robert J. Marshall as LCA 
president, succeeding the late Dr. 
Franklin Clark Fry he'66. 

'53 

Richard C. Burley, executive officer of 
Surface Division 4-59, United States 
Naval Reserve, \\ ilhamsport, Pa., has 



been promoted to commander. Cdr. 
Burley joined the unit in 1956, after 
serving a b o a r d the destroyer U.S.S. 
Coolbaugh. His wife is the former 
Elinor Smith '53. 

'54 

Kay Campbell, chairman of die 
science department at West Morris (N. 
J. ) High School, is serving on a com- 
mittee of teachers studying science ed- 
ucation for terminal students under the 
auspices of the New Jersey State Science 
Teachers Association and the State De- 
partment of Education. 

J. Mike Rising of Selinsgrove now 
operates his own business in general 
construction work for all phases of home 
building, commercial construction, and 
remodeling. Mr. Rising also is an in- 
structor in the Construction Department 
of Williamsport Area Community Col- 
lege. 



x'58 



Terry Al trams, former radio and tele- 
vision announcer for WGAL-TV, Lan- 
caster, Pa., is now program director and 
assistant manager of radio station 
WKOK, Sunbury, Pa. 

'61 

The Rev. Gilbert C. Askew, a gradu- 
ate student at Temple University and 
•former assistant pastor of Zion Lutheran 
Church, Sunbury, is driving a "book- 
mobile" this summer, bringing inex- 
pensive books into low income neighbor- 
hoods' in Philadelphia. The work is being 
done through the Teacher Corps. Dur- 
ing the academic year, he teaches in 
ghetto schools while working toward his 
master's degree in education. Mrs. 
Askew, the former Lynn Hassinger '57, 
is an administrative assistant at Temple. 

David E. Hutchinson III has been 
named district sales representative for 
Firestone Stores, Inc., and is working 
out of the Akron, Ohio office. 

Lauranee W. Miller has been pro- 
moted from assistant director of the 
Wiley House, Home for Emotionally 
Disturbed Children, in Allentown, Pa., 
to executive director. 

Frank A. Procopio, formerly a chemist 
in the corlon tile department of the Ann- 
strong Cork Company plant at Lancaster, 
Pa., has been promoted to die position 
ol plant chemist and quality control 
manager of the plant at Marietta, Pa. 



Frank is married to the former Louella 
Coecodrilli '62. 

'62 

Carl H. Hitehner is working as an 
auditor in the San Francisco office of 
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. 

'63 

George F. Amerman president a n d 
treasurer of Sunbury ( Pa. ) Foods, Inc., 
will join the S.U. faculty this fall as a 
part-time lecturer in accounting. 

Kay Potts teaches reading and algebra 
at Line Mountain High School, Man- 
data, Pa., and is a faculty adviser to the 
cheerleaders. 

Ens. Janet H. White is with the wom- 
en's branch of the U.S. Naval Reserve 
and is stationed in Jacksonville, Fla. 

'64 

William O. Andes III has completed 
two years in the Navy. He was a radio- 
man on the carrier U.S.S. Wasp. He is 
now employed as a caseworker for the 
Northumberland ( Pa. ) County Board of 
Assistance, working out of the Shamokin 
office. 

Terry L. Hand, who holds the master's 
degree in biochemistry from the Univer- 
sity of Missouri and is now a third-year 
medical student at Temple University, 
received one of the scholarships award- 
ed by the Allergy Foundation of America 
for two months of clinical and research 
training in the field of allergy. He will 
work under die supervision of Dr. Her- 
man Friedman, associate professor in the 
department of microbiology, Temple Uni- 
versity. Terry is married to die former 
Patricia Robinson. They are the parents 
of a daughter. Tiffany. 

John C. Horn Jr. has been promoted 
to captain in the U.S. Air Force. Capt. 
Horn is a navigator - bombardier at 
Homestead AFB, Fla., and a member 
of the Strategic Air Command. His wife 
is the former Susan Metz x'67. 

Mary Jane Witmer Rebuck was ap- 
pointed secondary music teacher for the 
Line Mountain School District, Man- 
data, Pa. 

Hon'64 

Dr. Gustaoe W. Weber. S.U. presi- 
dent, is listed in the 35th edition of 
"Who's Who in America," a publication 
which includes information about 66,000 
prominent persons throughout the 
country. 



16 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Two hour-long television programs dealing with the 21st annual Pennsylvania Inter- 
collegiate Band Festival will be shown by WITF-TV (Channel 33) at 10 p.m. Sept. 4 
and 11. Some 130 student musicians from 35 colleges and universities throughout 
the state participated in the festival Feb. 2-4 on the Susquehanna campus. WITF-TV, 
an educational station in Hershey, will make the two programs available to 22 member 
stations of the Eastern Educational Network. 



'65 

Carl L. Campbell, vice president of 
the Tri-County National Bank, served 
as speaker for the Selinsgrove Rotary 
Club at a June meeting. He spoke about 
the history of the check and illustrated 
the proper method of writing one. 

John Vignone is expected to play pro 
■football this fall for the Orlanda ( Fla. ) 
Panthers in the Continental League. The 
Panthers are coached by former S.U. 
coach and athletic director Jim Garrett. 
V i g n o n e spent three seasons in the 
Houston Astros' baseball chain and has 
been taking graduate studies at Penn- 
sylvania State University. 

Ens. William R. Walker, U.S.N.R., 
returned from a tour of duty in Da- 
Nang and Chu Lai, Viet n a m . Ens. 
Walker still has more than two years 
of active duty in his enlistment. He is 
married to the former Sandra Croivl '67. 
Sandy is teaching junior high Spanish 
and French in the Lansdowne - Aldan 
I Pa.) School District. 

x'65 

William R. Metz was graduated from 
Rider College in June. He received the 
B.S. degree in commerce with an indus- 
trial accounting major and is now em- 
ployed in the data processing department 
of the Proctor and Gamble Co. at Cin- 



cinnati. He is married to the former 
Ann Ferrence 63. 

'66 

Marilyn Eck worked in England for 
14 months on archaeological excavation 
and other temporary jobs. She and 
Margaret Gregory "67 then traveled in 
Scandinavia and Western Europe during 
the summer of 1967. Last fall they 
traveled in an Army truck through Yug- 
i slavia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Iran, Afghan- 
istan, Pakistan, India. Kashmir and 
Nepal. Marilyn returned heme in March 
and is doing organic research for the Re- 
search and Development Division of 
American Cyanamid Co. at Bound Brook, 
N.J. Peggy stayed in England and is 
wi rking there. 

Thomas R. Gresh, stationed at Fort 
Devens, Mass., has been promoted to the 
rank of first lieutenant in the Army. 

R. Peter Johnson and his wife, Martha, 
after ten weeks of strenuous training in 
the Hindu language, were assigned by 
the Peace Corps to a small village in 
the state of Bihar, India. The nearest 
city is Patna, near the Nepal border. 
They work in a dispensary and go out to 
the villages to publicize planned parent- 
hood. 

Stephen L. Ominsky has completed 
two years in the Peace Ccrps. He taught 
English to elementary school children 



in Santiago on Luzon Island in the Phil- 
ippines. He also became concerned with 
the economic plight of local farmers and 
spent a great deal of time, including a 
scheduled vacation, setting up demon- 
stration rice plots, using a new strain, 
IR8. Through the use of modern 
methods and equipment and the new 
strain, local fanners may be able to 
triple production. 

Capt. Richard A. Pawloski is serving 
with the Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 
323, Marine Air Group 13, in Chu Lai, 
Vietnam. His wife, the former Diane 
Hillegass '67, is a social worker in the 
Allentown (Pa.) area. 

James W. Knepp Jr.. a student at 
Dickinson School of Law, Carlisle, Pa., 
attended the Army Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps summer camp at Ft. 
Penning. Ga. He also has been serving 
a Congressional political internship this 
summer in the office of Congressman 
Herman T. Schneebeli at Washington. 

Hon'67 

Dr. Bruce L. Nary, Professor of Speech 
at Susquehanna, is chairman of a regional 
committee screening college drama 
groups for the first American College 
Theatre Festival to be held in Washing- 
ton, D.C. in the spring of 1969. 

x'68 

A/1C Robert Schilpp is serving at 
Kunsan Air Force Base in South Korea. 
He completed his basic training at Lack- 
land ( Tex. ) Air Force Base. 

Airman John P. Phillips has been 
recognized for helping his unit earn the 
U.S. Air Force Outstanding Unit Award. 
The unit was cited for exceptional and 
meritorious achievements while assisting 
in the evacuation of 1,736 refugees from 
c i" tries in the Middle East during the 
Arab-Israeli confict of June, 1967. 

x'69 

Pfc. James P. Schnure, who had been 
serving as scout and personnel carrier 
driver with the Eleventh Armored Cav- 
alry, was transferred at his own request 
to the Air Cavalry Troop of the Eleventh 
Armored and is a "door gunner" on heli- 
copters in Viet Nam. 

x'70 

Kathryn Hoffman is the recipient of 
a U.S. Public Health Service fellowship 
in cytotechnology for study at the Jef- 
ferson Medical School, Philadelphia. 



SUMMER 1968 



17 



Born Crusaders 



To Lt. (j.g.) and Mrs. Ronald L. Rei- 
ser v'6'6', a daughter, Leeanne Jean, May 
4. Ron was on sea duty at the time of 
his daughter's birth. Address: 1102 
Newport Manor, Newport, R.I. 02840. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William C. Treon 
'52. their second daughter, Sheri Anne, 
June 1. Rill works for the Post Office 
in Harrisburg. 3664 Derry St., Harris- 
burg, Pa. 17111. 

To die Rev. James A. '62 and Grace 
Ann Toothaker DcLong '67, a daughter, 
Bethani Ann, June 8. Grace is music 
s uper v i s o r in the Millville ( Pa. ) 
Elementary Schools and Jim is pastor 
of the Millville Lutheran Parish. 75 
Walnut St., Millville, Pa. 17846. 

To Edward and Geraldine Heinbach 
Green .v'6'6, a son, Edward III, June 17. 
Geraldine and her husband have been 
working as decorators at Hess Brothers 
of Allentown, Pa. 825 Linden St., Allen- 
town, Pa. 18101. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Z. Michael Nagy, a 
son, Ghristopher Michael, June 24. Dr. 
Nagy is assistant professor of psychology 
at S.U. 

To David and Anita Ruhling S a p p 
x'63, their second daughter, Joan Marie, 
July 9. Mr. Sapp is a special education 
teacher in the Prince Georges County 
(Md.) schools. Anita is a part-time 
charge nurse for a county Maternity- 
Family Planning Clinic. 9120 Alcona 
St., Lanham, Md. 20801. 



DEATHS 



Milton E. Wagner x'17, Selinsgrove, 
May 8. Mr. Wagner enlisted in the 
Army Ambulance Corps, organized at 
Susquehanna in 1917, and served 17 
months overseas during World War I. 
He was employed by Groce Silk Mill 
for a number of years and then by Trail- 
co Manufacturing and Sales Co., Hum- 
mels Wharf, retiring in 1959. A mem- 
ber of the United M< thodist Church and 
the Dauntless Hot k end Ladder Co., he 
is survived by his widow, four children, 
and four grandchildren. 

Dr. Charles P. Lamon x'36, Sunbury, 
Pa., May 16. Dr. Lamon was a chiro- 
practor in Sunbury for more than fifty 
years. Among his survivors is a son, 
Dr. Charles P. Jr. '44 of York. Pa. 



Ada V. Levan (Mrs. George B.), 
Williamsport, Pa., May 24. Mrs. Levan 
was active in the university's Women's 
Auxiliary. 

Oscar Belles, Johnstown, Pa., May 29. 
Mr. Belles, a retired mathematics pro- 
fessor, had taught at the Pittsburgh and 
Johnstown campuses of the University 
of Pittsburgh. He also was a World 
War I veteran and a former teacher and 
principal at Westmont - Hilltop High 
School. Miller R. Gerhardt '30 has 
brought several hundred books from 
Mr. Belles' library to Susquehanna for 
use in the university's library. 

W. Edgar Meek '40, Windber, Pa., 
May 31. Mr. Meek was graduated from 
the Pittsburgh School of Mortuary 
Science in 1947 and was die owner of 
the W. Edgar Meek Funeral Home, 
founded in 1902 by his grandfather, and 
later operated by his father. He also 
was a past president of the Somerset 
County Funeral Directors Association 
and the Windber Lions Club, treasurer 
of the United Mediodist Church, and a 
veteran of World War II. 

Cora Jarrett Wynn x'll, Latrobe, Pa., 
June 1. Mrs. Wynn was the widow of 
the late Col. Ellsworth Wynn. Among 
her survivors are the Rev. Elwood Staid 
36, who assisted at the funeral services, 
and a brother, Paul K. Jarrett '17. 

Paul F. Mowery x, Kane, Pa., June 2. 
Mr. Mowery was a graduate of Indiana 
State College and earned the master of 
education degree at U.C.L.A. He taught 
at schools in Union City, Erie County, 
for several years and for the past 30 
years had been employed in the Kane 
Area Schools, teaching American His- 
tory and commercial subjects. In ad- 
dition, he was in charge of the school 
cafeteria system. 

T. Irene Warren (Mrs. Edward A.). 
Sunbury, Pa., June 5. Mrs. Warren was 
a member of Zion Lutheran Church for 
some 50 years and was active in the 
Susquehanna Women's Auxiliary and 
the Order of Eastern Star. She also was 
a Republican committeewoman for Up- 
per Augusta Township. Dr. Lester G. 
Shannon '15 and the Rev. Elmer 
D r u m m '35 officiated at die funeral 
services. 

Allen Clark, 16-year-old son of the 
Rev. and Mrs. George A. Clark '38, 
drowned in June at Stoughton Lakes, 
near Jennerstown, Pa. Other survivors, 
in addition to his parents, include an 
uncle, the Rev. Robert R. Clark '35, and 
two cousins, Philip '62 and Princilla Clark 
Bashore (Mrs. Larry) '66. 

Ethel Schoch Wittenmyer 00, Whit- 
ford-Extron, Chester County, Pa., June 
24. Mrs. Wittenmyer lived in Harris- 



PREVIEW 

1968 

HOMECOMING 

October 19 



FRIDAY 



Queen's Coronation 
Social at Country Club 

SATURDAY 

Executive Board Meeting 

Float Parade 

Football: SU vs Upsala 

X-Country: SU vs Dickinson 

Open House 

Jazz Concert 

Ramsey Lewis Trio 



burg for 27 years, where her late hus- 
band, Samuel, was in the lumber busi- 
ness. Among her survivors are a brother, 
George S. Schoch '00; and four sisters- 
Pauline; Dorothy '14, wife of Dr. R. 
Burns Rearick '21; Laura '20, wife of 
Dr. James B. Horton '20; and Christine 
'19, widow of George Cassler '20. 

Jesse F. Rees '23, Harrisburg, Pa., 
July 3. Mr. Rees was supervisor of 
practical arts in the Harrisburg School 
District for many years, retiring in 1957. 
He was a former mechanical drawing 
teacher at the old Harrisburg Technical 
High School, taught Sunday School 
classes at Memorial Evangelical Lutheran 
Church for 25 years, is credited with 
organizing the first medical arts depart- 
ment at Harrisburg Hospital about 20 
years ago, and was a contributing mem- 
ber of the Shriners Hospital for Crippled 
Children in Los Angeles. He was a 
member of several fraternal organizations 
and was active in the Central YMCA and 
the Advisory Committee of the Keystone 
\n.( Council Boy Scouts of America. 
The Council honored him with its 
Beaver Award. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



The Susquehanna University Chairs 



For that special place in your home 
or office . . . ideal as a gift. 
Crafted of selected Northern 
hard woods . . . painted black with 
gold trim and the University seal 
in gold . . . cherry arms 
available on the General's chair. 



GENERAL'S CHAIR $37 
BOSTON ROCKER $30 

SIDE CHAIR $22 




GENERAL'S CHAIR 






Make checks payable to 
Susquehanna University 
Bookstore. Pennsylvania 
residents add 6% for State 
sales tax. Mail order to 
Alumni Office. Allow three 
or four weeks for delivery. 



ORDER BLANK 



To: ALUMNI OFFICE 

Susquehanna University 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 

Enclosed please find $ 



Please send: 



General's chair (s) @ $37 each 

□ black arms □ cherry arms 

Boston rocker Is) @ $30 each 

Side chair (s) @ $22 each 



I will pay freight charges on delivery from Gardner, Mass. 

Ship to 

Address 

City State Zip 



SUMMER 1968 



19 



THE SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 

Susquehanna University 

Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 

17870 




5TMASTER: Please notify if undelivered. 
En1 Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



oi\) 



c4U_^ ( - x T^y- 



FALL 1968 



Susquehanna Rlumnus 




» 4" 




3^ /^ 







'"V 




* 



Susquehanna University Alumni Association 

Directory of Officers 1968-69 



Marlyn R. Fetterolf '23, 163S Sunshine Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 President 
Edward S. Rogers, Jr. '42, 1629 S. Crescent Blvd., Yardley, Pa. 19067 

Vice President 
Dr. Erie I. Shobert II '35, St. Marys, Fa. 15857 Vice President 

Dorothy Turner '36, 781 Wyoming Ave., Kingston, Pa. 18704 Recording Secretary 
Chester G. Rowe '52, 306 W. Pine St., Sel:nsgrove, Pa. 17870 Treasurer 

Dr. John J. Houtz '08, 405 University Ave., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 Historian 

Louise Mehring Koontz '35 (Mrs. Howard E. Jr. I, Wyndwood Hill, 
Route 7, Box 24-C, Westminster, Md. 21157 

Representative on the University Board of Directors 
Lawrence M. Isaacs '43, 27 Thornewood Rd., Windmill Farm, Armonk, N.Y. 10504 

Representative on the University Board of Directors 
Simon B. Rhoads '30, Susquehanna Ave., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 

Representative to Athletic Committee 
Jack P. Shipe '40, Herndon, Pa. 17830 Representative to Athletic Committee 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1969 
Dr. Lawrence C. Fisher '31, Box 418, R.D. 2, Dover, Pa. 17315 
John Yonkondy '36, 357 Shoemaker St., Swoyerville, Pa. 18704 
Harry W. Butts, Jr. '48, 335 Chester Rd., Devon, Pa. 19333 
Dr. Nelson E. Bailey '57, R.R. 1, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 
Lynn E. Lerew, 324 Carlton Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1970 
Timothy E. Barnes '35, 251 N. Park St., Mt. Carmel, Pa. 17851 
Dorothy Eilhardt Gundrum '48 (Mrs. Eugene HJ, 1182 Sarah St., Bethel 



The Rev. Dale S. Bringman '48, 220 Homan Ave., State College, Pa. 
Dr. James C. Gehris '50, 633 W. Chestnut St., Shamokin, Pa. 17872 
Nancy Davis Raab '61 (Mrs. John H.), 33 Oakland Ave., Apt. 31, 

Bloomfield, N.J 
Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1971 
E. Nicodemus '31, 116 E. Market St., Lewistown, Pa. 17044 
Bantley '41, 4998 Longview Dr., Murrysville, Pa. 15668 
Young '51, 6136 Wayne Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 
Davenport '53, 420 Deerfield Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 
Liddington '54, 78 Center Ave., Chatham, N.J. 07928 



Park, Pa. 
15102 
16801 



07003 



Dr. Bryce 
George H. 
Shirley A. 
William C. 
George C. 

District Club Organizations 

ALTOONA 

W. Elwyn Taylor '08, 3600 Bea!e Ave., Altoona, Pa. 16601 President 

Addison E. Pohle '27, 1 1 08 - 22nd Ave., Altoona, Pa. 16601 Vice President 

Bettie Winey Moorhead '54 (Mrs. Gerald E.l, R.D. 1, Martinsburg, Pa. 16662 

Secretary -Treasurer 
BALTIMORE 
To be elected 

CALIFORNIA 
Dr. Robert N. Troutman '26, 434 W. 12th St., Claremont, Calif. 91711 President 

CENTRE-UNION 
Donald F. Spooner '43, 716 E. Beaver Ave., State College, Pa. 
The Rev. Kenneth R. Anderson '35, Centre Hall, Pa. 16828 

CHAMBERSBURG-HAGERSTOWN 
Lynn E. Lerew '63, 324 Carlton Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 
Paul Lucas '38, 1855 Scotland Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 
Marcella Chaya Turnbach '36, (Mrs. Edward), 401 W. King St 

Pa. 17257 Secretary-Treasurer 

HARRISBURG 

Richard J. Tietbohl '60, 10 Richland Lane, Apt. 103, Americana Apts., 

Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 President 

William C. Davenport '53, 420 Deerfield Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 Vice President 
Joyce Sheesley Shirey '62 (Mrs. Samuel R.l, 1290 Oyster Mill Rd., Camp 

Hill, Pa. 1701 1 Secretary 

Catherine Byrod Whitman '44 (Mrs. Clayton K.), 571 Walnut Rd., Steelton, 

Pa. 17092 Treasurer 

JOHNSTOWN 
Frank K. Fetterolf '48, 91 Colgate Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 
Mary Lizzio Govekar '47 (Mrs. hAax A.), 40 Main St., Conemaugh 



16801 President 
Vice President 

President 

Vice President 

Shippensburg, 



President 

Pa. 15909 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Director 2 years 

Director 3 years 



Thomas J. Weible '23, 324 Orchard St., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 
Mary Barnes Topper '37 (Mrs. John A.), Hyndman, Pa. 15545 
Harry P. Shaffer '29, 526 Vickroy Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 

LEHIGH VALLEY 
Dr. Nevin C. T. Shaffer '49, 1632 Walnut St., Allentown, Pa. 18102 President 
Margaret Hartz Ide Maguire '33 (Mrs. James C.l, Lanark Star Route, 

Allentown, Pa. 18100 Vice President 

Corinne Kahn Kramer '45 (Mrs. Harold R.l, 1154 E. Cedar St., 

Allentown, Pa. 18103 Secretary-Treasurer 

LEWISTOWN 
Herbert K. Yingling '63, R.D. 3, Box 1 22A, Lewistown, Pa. 17044 President 

Edward R. Rhodes '57, Box 191, Lewistown, Pa. 17044 Vice President 

Phyllis Swartz Derr '49 (Mrs. Aloysius V.I, Seneca Rd., Shawnee Hills, 

Belleville, Pa. 17004 Secreta y-Treasurer 

MOUNT CARMEL-SHAMOKIN 
Timothy E. Barnes '35, 251 N. Park St., Mt. Carmel, Pa. 1 
Dr. James C. Gehris '50, 633 W. Chestnut St., Shamokin, 



S. John Price '42, 1435 Arch St., Ashland, Pa, 17921 



7851 President 

Pa. 17872 

Vice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



NEW YORK METROPOLITAN 

The Rev. Dr. John G. Gensel '40, 215 W. 98th St., Apt. 11-B, 

New York, N.Y. 10025 Vice Presider 

Richard G. Westervelt '50, 412 E. 55th St., New York, N.Y. 10022 

Secretary-Treasure 
Jack Thorp '50, Thorp Lane, Norwalk, Conn. 06850 Executive Committe 

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA 
Roland R. Rosetti '51, Box 23, South Canaan, Pa. 18459 Presider 

Xavier Abbott '35, 215 Oliver St., Swoyerville, Pa. 18704 Vice Presider 

Alice Greeger Pfeffer '51 (Mrs. William M.I, Trailwood R.D. 1, 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18702 Secretary-Treasure 

NORTH NEW JERSEY 
George '54 and Lorraine Ranck Liddington '52, 78 Center Ave., 

Chatham, N.J. 07928 Presider 

Robert C. '53 and Margaret Brady Wyllie x'56, 8 Thorne Place 

Fanwood, N.J. 07023 Vice Presider 

John H. '62 and Nancy Davis Raab '61, 33 Oakland Ave., Apt. 31, 

Bloomfield, N.J. 07003 Secretary-Treasure 



Paul Wagner '50, 



PHILADELPHIA 

25 Old Lancaster Rd., Apt. A- 



Director 
Director 



President 



Bala Cynwyd, Pa. 19004 

President 
Donald F. Wohlsen '50, Kenilworth Lane, Ambler, Pa. 19002 1st Vice President 
Harry W. Butts '48, 335 Chester Rd., Devon, Pa. 19333 2nd Vice President 

Marvel Cowling Robinson '53 (Mrs. Franklin), 309 Woodridge Lane, 

Media, Pa. 19063 Recording Secretary 

Shirley A. Young '51, 6136 Wayne Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 

Corresponding Secretary 
Robert E. Ricedorf '50, 705 S. Penn St., West Chester, Pa. 19380 Treasurer 

Harold E. Shaffer '40, 319 E. Marshall St., West Chester, Pa. 19380 Director 

Louise E. West '39, 1 1 I S. Church St., West Chester, Pa. 19380 
Edward S. Rogers '42, 1629 S. Crescent Blvd., Yardley, Pa. 19067 

PITTSBURGH 
Eugene H. Gundrum '48, 1182 Sarah St., Bethel Park, Pa. 15102 
Harry R. Johnston '49, 284 McClane Farm Rd., Washington, Pa. 15301 

Vice President 
Dorothy Eilhardt Gundrum '48 (Mrs. Eugene HJ, 1182 Sarah St., Bethel 

Park, Pa. 15102 Secretary-Treasurer 

READING 
W. Frank Laudenslayer '39, R.D. 3, Boyertown, Pa. 19512 President 

Dr. Ralph H. Tietbohl, Jr. '49, 3031 Van Reed Rd., Sinking Spring, Pa. 

19608 Vice President 

William S. Whiteley '35, 1910 N. 15th St., Reading, Pa. 19604 Secretary 

Richard Cahn '58, 412 Church Rd., Wernersville, Pa. 19565 Treasurer 

SOUTH JERSEY 
Kenneth F. Erdley Jr. '55, 219 Lakeside Dr., Glassboro, N.J. 08028 President 

Leslie R. Butler '62, 51 S. Summit Ave., Pitman, N.J. 08071 Vice President 

Richard J. Biedermann '64, 21 B West Grant St., Woodstown, N.J. 08098 

Vice President 
Judith Arnold Mclntyre (Mrs. Ralph P.I, 309 Victor Ave., Cherry Hill, 

N.J. 08034 
Peter M. Nunn '57, 32 Mercator Lane, Willingboro, N.J. 08046 
Cathleen W. Mackey '65, 423 Bradshaw Ave., Haddonfield, N.J. 08033 
David J. Schumacher '64, 3103 Sheffield Dr., Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077 
The Rev. Ralph I. Shockey, S.T.M. '36, 265 E. Main St., Moorestown, 

N.J. 03057 
Douglas E. Spotts '63, 1305 Columbia Ave., Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077 

SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY 
Roger A. Holtzapple '59, 228 N. 11th St., Lewisburg, Pa. 17837 
Harold E. Bollinger '39, 640 King St., Northumberland, Pa. 17857 
Carl L. Campbell '65, 327 Orange St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 
Joan Ortolani Billig '66 (Mrs. Joseph S. Jr.), 36 Upper Market St., 

Milton, Pa. 17847 



Secretary 

Treasurer 

Director 

Director 

Director 
Director 



President 
Vice President 
Treasurer 



Secretary 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

John A. Schoffstall '33, 2104 Grayson PL, Falls Church, Va. 22043 President 

Karl H, F. Schaffrath '64, 6666 Hillandale Rd., Apt. 21, Chevy Chase, 

Md. 20015 1st Vice President 

Freida Dreese Dunkle '29 (Mrs. Lloyd L. Jr.), 4538 N. 39th St., 

Arlington, Va. 22207 2nd Vice President 

Lois Renfer '52, 7511 Springlake Dr. C2, Bethesda, Md. 20032 Secretary-Treasurer 

WILLIAMSPORT 
Winifred Myers O'Dell '49 (Mrs. George!, 190 N. Railroad St., 

Hughesville, Pa. 17737 President 

Jill A. Fuller '58, 503 Allegheny St., Jersey Shore, Pa. 17740 Secretary-Treasurer 

YORK-HANOVER 
John H. Hendricks '57, R.D. 1, Sunset Lane, York, Pa. 17404 President 

Richard S. Karschner '65, Edgeboro Dr., Manchester, Pa. 17345 Vice President 

Dorothy Nitchman Bowen '49 (Mrs. Lyle H.I, 720 Gunnison Rd., York, Pa. 

17404 Secretary 

E. Jane Stitt '44, 2000 Worth St., York, Pa. 17404 Treasurer 

Raymond W. Stiller '59, 1530 Fifth Ave., York, Pa. 17403 Committee 

The Rev. Charles A. Snyder '53, Mt. Zion Rd., R.D. 7, York, Pa. 17402 

Committee 
Patricia P. Heathcote '52, 2421 Cambridge Rd., York, Pa. 17402 Committee 

Flora Ellmore Shilling x'53 (Mrs. Russell T.), 320 Pennsylvania Ave., 

York, Pa. 17404 Committee 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol. 38 



FALL 1968 



No. 1 



CONTENTS 



A current TV commercial includes a jingle that 
goes. "You've come a long way. Baby, to get 
where you've gotten today." Now there's a spring- 
board to comment on just about anything. 

We could discuss Susquehanna in general, of 
course, and we will. But that will wait for the 
next issue, for which we're planning some special 
treatment — a kind of review — of what's happened 
at and to the University during the past ten years. 
We'll mark the accomplishment of one phase in 
Susquehanna's development as preparations are 
made for the next. 

For now, we simply want you to notice that 
we've made a few improvements in the appearance 
of this magazine. We've widened the margins, 
changed the body type face from Caledonia to 
Times Roman, and styled up some of the head- 
ings. We trust that these innovations will increase 
legibility and help your enjoyment of the magazine. 

Susquehanna Alumnus began publication in 
the fall of 1931. For six years it was a four-page 
monthly, then was changed to a quarterly with a 
magazine format. Size and style have been re- 
vamped over the years, most recently in 1959. 
Hope you like the new look. 

And everyone at S.U. hopes that everyone 
out there has a blessed Christmas season and a 
great New Year. Thanks to all alumni for their 
continuing enthusiam and support for their Alma 
Mater. 



Directory of Officers 1968-69 



A Department On the Move 



Involvement 



Inside Front Cover 
. . . 4 

. . . . 9 



A Wet Homecoming 



Susquehannans On Parade 



"I Do' 



Advanced Degrees 



SU Sports 

by Ron Berkheitner 

Born Crusaders 



Deaths 



Postscript 

by Buss Can '52 



10 

14 
18 

22 
25 

26 
26 

27 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writers 

RONALD E. BERKHEIMER 

MARGARET F. ERNST 



THE COVER 

It was a long football season, with not too many 
victories. One of the Crusaders' finest moments 
was this game with Lycoming — a 17-13 win. 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Publish- 
ed four times a year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



FALL 1968 



A Department 
On the Move 



Otto Reimherr is a modest man. Talking with him 
about the present Department of Philosophy and 
Religion at Susquehanna, and tracing its develop- 
ment over the past nine years, one might get the 
impression that Dr. Reimherr himself had little if 
anything to do with the story. A closer look re- 
veals that nothing could be farther from the truth. 

For Otto Reimherr arrived on the University 
scene in the fall of 1959. In the previous spring, 
Dr. Gustave W. Weber had been inaugurated as 
the eleventh President. The tiny Pennsylvania lib- 
eral arts college — enrollment, less than 500 in the 
second semester of 1958-59 — was on the threshold 
of growth. Growth in numbers of students and 
faculty, growth in buildings and other physical 
facilities, growth in prestige. And yet more im- 
portant, growth in the realm of academics. 

Just started on its second century of existence, 
Susquehanna had a tradition and a heritage which 
many today call conservative. There were eight 
hours of courses in religion required of all students, 
daily chapel attendance required of all students, a 
general attitude and behavior pattern which be- 
spoke the conservative atmosphere. 

What is sometimes overlooked by the casual 
observer is that Susquehanna, as the Missionary 
Institute, was actually founded on very liberal ideals 
— to shuck off some of the old, strict standards of 
theological training then required of those being 



ordained to the Lutheran ministry, to provide a 
more practical kind of education for pastors who 
were direly needed on the frontiers of the West, to 
create an indigenous American Church, unfettered 
by the "hyper-orthodoxy" and denominationalism 
which characterized the European Church. 

Throughout its history, the school has been a 
pioneer along new avenues of educational endeavor. 
Educational historians have credited Susquehanna 
with having been America's first junior college, by 
virtue of the nature of its two-year program offered 
in the early decades. It became one of the nation's 
first coeduational colleges when it admitted women 
to full status in 1873 — in truth, women attended 
the first classes when they began on June 14, 1858. 
In the 1920s when Pennsylvania school teachers 
who were graduates of normal schools were asked 
to take degree-qualifying college courses, Susque- 
hanna operated a number of extension centers in 
various cities of the Commonwealth. Again, the 
University was among the earlier institutions to 
utilize this means of serving the needs in higher 
education. 

When viewed in perspective, the concept of 
Susquehanna's conservative heritage becomes some- 
what mythical. To be sure, certain requirements 
— academic, social and other — have been fostered. 
But they simply reflect the concern of the founders 
and their followers for educating the whole man. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Professor Otto Reimherr is 
the architect of current studies 
in religion at Susquehanna. 



Before Reimherr's appearance on the Selins- 
grove campus, the teaching of religion was in the 
hands of one man. Benjamin Lotz not only taught 
all the religion courses, but he also taught all the 
philosophy courses and wore the hat of part-time 
chaplain as well. At Susquehanna since 1947, he 
had become almost legendary to his students. Well 
read in the fields of theology and philosophy, pos- 



sessed of a facile pen, love for and skill in languages, 
he was devoted to travel including hitch-hiking, 
and had a constant and penetrating interest in 
people. 

"Anyone who knew Ben during his period at 
Susquehanna welcomed the privilege, even in mo- 
ments of disagreement," says Reimherr. "He stirred 
the students to think and was rewarded with 
their love. His idea of a class was a Socratic dia- 
logue, and his idea of a chapel service was a pro- 
gram of religious edification." 

With the increasing enrollment of 1959, new 
help was needed. Otto Reimherr was invited to join 
the program which Lotz directed. Campus pastor 
at the University of Maryland and also a parish 
pastor, Reimherr had earned his doctorate at Co- 
lumbia. He and Lotz were a congenial team, shar- 
ing interests in both religion and philosophy. "Ben 
always insisted religion should come before phi- 
losophy, and I thought it should be the other way 
around. . ." And the current department head 
quickly adds, "as suggested by Paul Tillich." 

In 1961 the staff was expanded again with the 
addition of "a remarkable man from Toledo, Ohio." 
Dr. John Slater, also a Lutheran pastor, had studied 
at the University of Pittsburgh with the great teach- 
er of philosophy, Richard Hope. Slater modeled 
his style after that of Hope, and made every class 
a thoughtful exploration into a problem. Students 
who refused to think did not like John Slater's style, 
but those who were alert considered him one of the 
finest teachers they had at Susquehanna. 

"Even in conversation," Reimherr continues, 
"one was convinced that John was seriously explor- 
ing a problem with all the thoughts at his avail. If 
there is a peripatetic tradition in philosophy, John 
Slater typified it as he would be seen on his un- 
ceasing walks through the community, immersed 
in thought. His untimely death in December 1964 
deprived Susquehanna of a great teacher indeed." 

Then came a new member of the department 
whom Reimherr describes as "a breezy young whip- 



FALL 1968 



persnapper, fresh from the climate of the University 
of Chicago, Richard Edwards. With a perpetual 
smile on his face, his brown beret topping his bald 
head, at the office at 7:30 each morning to begin 
his scholarly study, Dick brought to the school an 
aura of interest in biblical studies, punctuated by 
the teaching of comparative religion." With the 
coming of Edwards, the program in religion and 
philosophy took a new direction. Instead of three 
generalists sharing duties in philosophy and religion, 
Edwards stuck to the latter, insisting that he wanted 
to specialize in religion. 

This direction on his part, along with the em- 
phasis on more specialization current in the aca- 
demic world, brought Ludwig Schlecht from Emory 
University, after Phi Beting at Gettysburg College, 
to take over duties in philosophy exclusively. 

In 1964 Dr. Joseph Flotten was appointed to 
the staff as the University's first full-time chaplain. 
He also began lecturing in the field of religion. 
Bringing with him the solidity of a long tenure in 
a metropolitan parish as well as several years as 
chaplain of Wagner College, he has a keen sense 



of the issues confronting urban society. Flotten 
enriched the life of the school as a teacher and 
pastor, too. And, as Reimherr puts it, "his counsel 
and help have been invaluable in the transition 
through which Susquehanna was to pass as the years 
went by." 

But what of the program in religion that had 
been developed under Ben Lotz's guidance? Lotz 
followed the tenet that students should have a well- 
rounded introduction to the study of religion. Four 
courses for two credits each were required of all stu- 
dents — Old Testament, New Testament, Christian 
Philosophy, and Christian Ethics. The third was soon 
changed from one in the philosophy of religion to 
a kind of miniature dogmatics course called Chris- 
tian Faith. This was in line with Lotz's interests. 

With the push to open the curriculum and to 
offer more variety to the student, the pattern of four 
courses was abandoned and a pair of three-credit 
courses was introduced, to be followed by a two- 
credit seminar. All degree candidates were to take 
Introduction to Christianity — essentially the same as 
the old Christian Faith — and were free to elect a 




bMMMI 
Chaplain Flotten gives 
invaluable counsel and help 
during transitional years. 




Jennings (at right) wins student poll 
as Professor of the Year, with 
presentation by Dun Corveleyn 69. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Livernois, Wiley and Fine 
provide the department 
with ecumenical strengths. 




second three-credit course, completing the require- 
ment with the seminar. It was immediately ap- 
parent that to properly run a series of seminars for 
the entire student body would be an expensive un- 
dertaking for a school Susquehanna's size. In the 
face of the impracticality, the program was reduced 
to six credits. 

The department did not confine itself to merely 
studying religion in the classroom; religion became 
a part of University extension or continuing educa- 
tion. Through the help of the Board of Social Mis- 
sions of the United Lutheran Church and the Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania Synod, the department developed 
an Institute on Race Relations and brought to the 
campus such lecturers as J. Oscar Lee from the 
National Council of Churches and William Lazareth 
of the Philadelphia Seminary. 

Another extension program of the department 
took the students to West Berlin. Reimherr says 
that's a story in itself. Participating in the Church 
Worker's Exchange program of the Lutheran World 
Federation in 1961, he had come to know Dr. 
Georg Schoenweiss, a pastor in the Church of Ba- 
varia, who was invited to teach for a semester at 
Susquehanna during the sabbatical leave of Ben 
Lotz. It was Schoenweiss who suggested the 
European program. Reimherr conducted it. 

In the fall of '62 and the spring of '63 prepar- 
ations were made for the seminar in West Berlin. 
With a financial grant from the Lutheran Brother- 
hood Life Insurance Society of Minneapolis, another 
on-campus institute was held — this one on Christian- 
ity and Communism. Such people as Charles West 
of Princeton and Victor Ferkiss of Georgetown par- 
ticipated in the institute, and during the summer a 
group of Susquehanna students estblished a month's 



stay in West Berlin to continue study of the subject. 
With help from Schoenweiss a travel program was 
arranged through southern Germany, Switzerland, 
Italy, France, and England. Accompanying the 
group was John Whetstone of the Lutheran Church 
in America's Commission on Church Architecture, 
who lectured on religious art and architecture. 

The European program thus begun was con- 
tinued in the summer of 1965 in cooperation with 
Thiel College, which supplied an assistant director 
in the person of its Chaplain Boyd Gibson. Again 
directed by Reimherr, the seminar dealt with prob- 
lems in religion and philosophy and was financially 
aided by a grant from the LCA Board of College 
Education and Church Vocations. Again, too, 
Georg Schoenweiss was involved. He delivered 
lectures and led discussions at key centers of Euro- 
pean religious thought, and arranged for the group 
to meet with Pope Paul. The following year, Sus- 
quehanna lost a close and valued friend when Dr. 
Schoenweiss was killed in an automobile accident 
in the city of Munich. 

Increasing specialization brought yet other new 
faces to the University campus. One of those Reim- 
herr says Susquehanna will never forget is that of 
Carter Lindberg, "who came with his red beard 
from the School of Religion at the State University 
of Iowa, where he had specialized in the study of 
the Reformation with the distinguished director of 
the school, Dr. George Forell." After two years, 
Lindberg moved on to an interesting position as 
Protestant Reformation expert amid the Jesuit fac- 
ulty of Holy Cross College in Massachusetts. 

Time took its toll in the form of other depar- 
tures, also. Dick Edwards returned to the Univer- 
sity of Chicago to take up New Testament studies 



FALL 1968 



with the brilliant Norman Perrin. Together, they 
developed a new theory of the structure of the gos- 
pels, called "eschatological correlatives." After fin- 
ishing his Ph.D., Edwards joined the Thiel College 
faculty this fall. Lud Schlecht, who also finished 
his doctorate, moved to Lycoming College in Wil- 
liamsport. 

Ben Lotz retired from Susquehanna in 1966 to 
take up residence at Topton, Pennsylvania. This 
vacancy was filled with the appointment of a man 
Reimherr calls "an attractive young scholar from 
the South." William Jennings, another Lutheran 
pastor, graduate of the Southern Seminary with a 
Ph.D. from Yale, has an intense interest in social 
ethics. Able to make his classes fascinating to stu- 
dents, he won their hearts and was named Professor 
of the Year in 1968. Lotz had been given the 
same award two years earlier. 

Another talented young man was added to the 
department in 1967. David Wiley, product of Mc- 
Cormick Seminary in Chicago and of outstanding 
Reformation scholars at Duke University, introduced 
a Presbyterian flavor to the offerings in religion. 
Thus began the process toward an ecumenical de- 
partment, in step with the times. 

When Susquehanna needed a permanent re- 
placement for Dick Edwards — his work in the 
biblical field had been handled on a temporary ba- 
sis by Joyce Harmony, a graduate of Muhlenberg 
College and Princeton Seminary — it turned to a 
Roman Catholic scholar, Tom Livernois. This new 
member of the religion faculty holds degrees from 
the Seminary of St. Vincent DePaul, the University 
of Louvain in Belgium, and the Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago. 

Meanwhile, a major in religion had been de- 
veloped and most of the catalog rewritten for this 
field. The courses are divided into three separate 
groups: Biblical Studies, History and Thought of 
Religion, Ethics and Society. Majors are required 
to take a specified number of credits in each group. 
The first two religion majors were graduated last 



spring. It should perhaps be pointed out that 
while the University has always graduated a num- 
ber of pre-theological students, the seminaries do 
not require a specific major. They do suggest that 
certain courses be included in a student's prepara- 
tion, but the major can be almost anything, and 
often is. 

With the addition of Livernois to the teaching 
staff it was possible to bring the department into 
line with the specializations the major demands 
and to utilize most effectively the individual skills 
and interests of the various teachers — Reimherr in 
the biblical field, Wiley in the historical field, Liver- 
nois in the theological field, and Jennings in the 
ethics field. 

But Otto Reimherr isn't finished yet — and 
probably never will be, for he epitomizes the very 
spirit of the University's heritage. A heritage of 
constant seeking for better ways to speak to men, 
of the broadest and most liberal education for ser- 
vice. 

For the spring semester of the current academic 
year, another step has been taken, another dimen- 
sion added. For some years Reimherr has main- 
tained a close friendship with the Jewish Chautauqua 
Society of New York. The society has assisted 
Susquehanna several times with lectures on Judaism 
and it has made generous additions to the Univer- 
sity Library collection on Judaica. Now it has es- 
tablished a regular lectureship on Judaism for the 
coming semester, with Rabbi Hillel Fine of Temple 
Ohev Sholom in Harrisburg as Susquehanna's guest 
lecturer. A native of England, Dr. Fine is a widely 
known and highly respected scholar who was for- 
merly on the faculty of Hebrew Union College in 
Cincinnati. 

The pursuit of knowledge in the Department 
of Religion is an exciting and vital activity. Otto 
Reimherr generates the vitality with his own crea- 
tivity, his endless energy and quiet industry, and 
his tremendous capacity for gathering exciting 
teachers around him. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




INVOLVEMENT 

Susquehanna University is not located in 
Urban America. But Rural America has 
its needs, too, and its opportunities for 
involvement in serving tho:e needs. The 
response of Susquehannans can always 
be counted upon. One recent instance 
(September 10 -October 18) was day 
care for the children of migrant farm 
workers in Snyder and Northumberland 
Counties. Some 35 students, from Phi 
Mu Delta, Kappa Delta and one of 
Charles Igoe's English classes, and five 
faculty members were involved in the 
program at St. Matthew's Lutheran 
Church, Shamokin Dam. OEO-funded, 
it was directed by Pamela Blanpied (top 
photo), wife of English instructor John 
Blanpied, and the Rev. E. L. Strickland 
of St. Paul A.M.E. Church, Waynesboro, 
Pa. Students in the bottom photo are 
John Oliver '69 of North Caldwell, N.J. 
and Pat Lundholm '71 of Croydon, Pa. 




FALL 1968 




A Wet 
Homecoming 



Homecoming 1968 proved to be one of the wettest 
in many years . . . and the Crusaders lost their 
fourth straight Homecoming football game since 
1964's 36-17 triumph over Juniata. It rained so 
hard on Saturday that the float parade was canceled. 
But the weekend had its winners — a Queen was 
crowned, the floats were judged (and used in the 
Selinsgrove Hallowe'en parade the following week), 
the rain let up shortly after the football contest 
began, and an S.U. runner came in first in the 



The feature event on Friday night was coronation of the 
Homecoming Queen, Holly Ford '69, a music major from 
Altoona, Pa. Here, Master of Ceremonies Dave Hesel 
of Levittown, Pa. presents her with flowers. At right, 
it was a radiant Queen Holly who walked back up the 
aisle with her escort, Keith B e 1 1 e n of Wayne, Pa. 




10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



J? 



0fc 



: f? fLfbi p 




Before the Coronation Pageant began, the Home- 
coming Court posed for this photo: 1967 Queen 
Denise Horton Jackson, Marilyn Kausch '69 of Tea- 
neck, N.J., Queen Holly, Eileen Moninghoff '70 of 
Milford, N.J., Lisa Deamer '71 of Santurce, Puerto 
Rico, Sandra McDermott '72 of Northport, N.Y. 




Susquehanna's favorite vocalist, Linda 
I a e g e r '69 of Pottstown, Pa., enter- 
tains with selections from "Mame" 
during the Friday evening Pageant. 



cross country meet with Dickinson. Another winner 
with alumni was the Campus Center, Susquehanna's 
grand new building where registration, coffee, 
tours, and chats with old friends kept returnees 
occupied on Saturday morning. Fraternity parties 
were well attended, and estimates of the number of 
alumni who were on hand for at least part of the 
festivities run around 600. Close the books on an- 
other one — a wet one and a gala one, with no 
dampening of the spirit. 




The cheerleaders, decked out in their new uniforms, lead the Pep Rally 
from the Chapel Auditorium steps. Below, Alumni Association Executive 
meeting is in progress with President Marlyn Fetterolf '23 seated up front. 




FALL 1968 



II 




Mellon Lounge in the Campus 
Center was the most popular place 
on that rainy Saturday morning. In 
this picture, President Weber talks 
things over with John Hendricks 
'57 and Dr. Larry Fisher '31. 





Coffee and doughnuts were enjoyed by nearly 
everyone, including Lynn Lerew '63 and his wife. 



Frank Fetterolf '48, newly - elected 
member of Susquehanna's Board of 
Directors, and his wife were there too. 



Merle Beam '22 took 
time out to review pro- 
cedures with Carl Moyer 
'63, assistant director of 
admissions. At right, a 
group of recent graduates 
admires painting placed 
in stereo room by class- 
mates in memory of 
Gerald I v e r s o n '67. 





12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




\ 



Big winner on Saturday was 
freshman Jeff Karver of Boyer- 
town, Pa., who placed first in 
the cross country meet while 
the team dropped the final de- 
cision to Dickinson, 24 - 37. 






The dreary day made the gridders look beaten before 
they started, but they fought the good fight though 
losing to the Upsala College Vikings by a score of 16-9. 



The harriers started their 
run at halftime of the 
football game, circled 
the field, exited to cover 
the 4' 2 -mile course, and 
finished again in front 
of the home stands. 




Halfback Bill Guth had 
the most carries in the 
Upsala clash, but scoring 
consisted of a Henschke 
to Campbell pass and a 
field goal by Steve Freeh. 




Buss Carr presented trophies to the float win- 
ners, Phi Mu Delta and Kappa Delta. Their 
representatives were Bruce Bradley '70 of 
Lincroft, N.J., Virginia Moratz '69 of Wyckoff, 
N.J., and Linda Brubaker '69 of Tyrone, Pa. 



FALL 1968 



13 



Smquehannans On Parade 



'10 

The Rev. Arthur C. Harris is now 
residing at St. John's Lutheran Home, 
Mars, Pa. 

'15 

Wilbur Bennage and his wife cele- 
brated their 50th wedding anniversa- 
ry in August at their home in Lewis- 
burg, Pa. 

'17 

The Rev. Dr. Park W. Huntington 
was recently honored by the Veterans 
Administration Hospital, Wilmington, 
Del., in recognition of his 15 years 
as chaplain. 

'19 

The Rev. Dr. Willard D. Allbeck 
has donated a copy of the 1968 re- 
vised edition of his "Studies in the 
Lutheran Confessions" to the Susque- 
hanna University Library. He was 
also honored with a Festschrift pub- 
lished this year by Augsburg Press 
under the title "The Maturing of 
American Lutheranism." 

'24 

Dr. Claude A. Buss was presented 
with a scroll of honor by the U.S. 
Department of State. Signed by Sec- 
retary of State Dean Rusk, the docu- 
ment recognizes Dr. Buss's devoted 
service to the cause of Philippine- 
American friendship and understand- 
ing for more than a quarter of a 
century. In the diplomatic service at 
the outbreak of World War II, he was 
serving as first assistant to Francis 
B. Sayre when the latter was high 
commissioner to the Philippines. Sayre 
returned to the U.S. ahead of the ad- 
vancing Japanese and at the fall of 
Eataan and Corregidor Dr. Buss was 
acting commissioner — the highest 
ranking American in the Islands. As 
such, he was interned in Manila and 
later in Tokyo. An outstanding 
scholar and specialist on the Far 
East, he currently teaches at Stan- 
ford University. 

'25 

Dr. Christie E. Zimmerman, mis- 
sionary in India, has completed The 



Handbook, written in Telugu for the 
use of Bible women and evangelists 
among the non-Christians in the Te- 
lugu area of India. Her next fur- 
lough to the United States is sched- 
uled for April 1969. 

'26 

Dr. Lee E. Boxer was a featured 
speaker for mathematics teachers at 
a teachers conference of Harrisburg 
Area Catholic Schools in October 
He is currently teaching at the Har- 
risburg Area Community College. 

Gere L. Sharretts, chairman of the 
science department at Shikellamy Jr. 
H.S., Sunbury, has been named to an 
elite group of "superior science teach- 
ers" by the Pennsylvania Science ■ 
Teachers Association. 

'28 

The Rev. Harold F. Doehier re- 
cently assumed duties as a pastor of 
the Hobbie Lutheran Church in Wap- 
wallopen. Pa. He formerly served 
St. Peter's Lutheran Church, Lafa- 
yette Hill, Pa. 

J. Paul Dohl retired as principal 
of the Olean (N.Y.) Jr. H.S. for 16 
years. He will now begin a term of 
service in Korea as administrator 
and field representative for the 
United Methodist Committee for 
Overseas Relief. An extensive pro- 
gram, it includes children's homes, 
refugee rehabilitation centers, self- 
help development projects, and other 
work. 

'29 

The Rev. Adam P. Bingaman was 
honored last spring as recipient of 
the Montgomery (Pa.) Rotary Club's 
first "Man of the Year Award." 

Helen Aminerman Brown is living 
at Phoebe Home, 1925 Turner St., 
Allentown. Pa. 18104. She served as 
a missionary to China for eleven 
years after a teaching career in Free- 
burg and Shamokin. 

The Rev. Franz A. Lundahl of 
Forest Park, 111. was guest speaker 
for the Homecoming Service at St. 
Peter's Lutheran Church of Red 
Cross, a Church of the Dornsife 



(Pa.) Lutheran Parish which he serv- 
ed from 1957 until his retirement in 
1963. 

30 

The Rev. Ralph H. Casner retired 
on October 31 as pastor of Christ 
Lutheran Church, Mt. Bethel, Pa. 
He and his wife, the former Gussie 
Eisenhuth x, are residing in Glen- 
more, Pa. 

Oren S. Kaltriter was elected presi- 
dent of the Berry College branch 
of the Georgia Education Associa- 
tion this year. 

'31 

The Rev. Paul R. Ashby retired 
last summer after serving for more 
than eleven years as chaplain at the 
Wassaic State School, Dutchess 
County, New York. He was chaplain 
for the Commonwealth of Pennsyl- 
vania. 1929-1957, and for 22 of these 
years served as pastor of St. Mat- 
thew Lutheran Church. Shamokin 
Dam, Pa. 

'34 

P. Richard Fisher, principal of 
Milton (Pa.) H.S., spent the summer 
touring Europe and visiting his son 
who serves with the U.S. Army in 
Germany. 

D. Edgar Hutchison and his wife, 
the former Aberdeen Phillips, spent 
three weeks in the British Isles dur- 
ing the summer. 

'35 

Dr. Erie 1. Shobert 11 was honored 
this fall by the Board of Trustees of 
Pennsylvania State University for his 
long and distinguished service to the 
cause of higher education in Penn- 
sylvania. 

'41 

The Rev. Carl C. Helt is now 
pastor of Fawn United Methodist 
Church, Fawn Grove, Pa. He was 
previously pastor of Mt. Olivet United 
Methodist Church, Mechanicsburg. 
Pa. 

Edward F. Korper is division man- 
ager and furniture buyer for Sears, 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Roebuck & Co.. Lubbock. Tex. He 
returns to S.U. each fall for Home- 
coming to visit his many friends. 

'50 

Henry G. Chadwick, broadcasting 
sales executive, has joined WFIL-TV 
in Philadelphia as general sales man- 
ager. He was formerly manager of 
the Philadelphia office and vice presi- 
dent of Blair Radio, a division of 
John Blair and Co.. national broad- 
casting sales representatives. 

The Rev. Lloyd T. Wilson is pastor 
of St. Luke's Lutheran Church, Roar- 
ing Springs, Pa. He had been pastor 
of the Delaware Run Lutheran 
Church. Watsontown. since 1964. 

'51 

Alice Yonghaus Davenport is work- 
ing on Timothy Churchmouse, a 
children's television show originating 
in Indianapolis. Her address is R.R. 
4. Box 739. Greenwood. Ind. 46142. 

'53 

The Rev. E. Lawrence Bottiger has 
resigned his pastorate of Trinity 
Evangelical Lutheran Church. Hazle- 
ton. Pa., to accept the associate di- 
rectorship of the Hazleton Lutheran 
Home. His wife, the former Carol 
R e i d I e r , is administrator of the 
Home. 

Navy Commander Robert A. Mes- 
ler is now Commander of the USS 
Walker, a destroyer homeported in 
Pearl Harbor. Hawaii. He and his 
wife, the former Marjorie Way '52, 
make their home in Honolulu. 

Ernest R. "Mike" Walker is a 
member of the law firm of Franke. 
Ayres, Hager, Kuyat and Walker in 
Johnstown. A major in the Marine 
Corps Reserve, he also is active in 
the Young Republicans of Pennsyl- 
vania. He and his family live at 421 
Wayne Street. Johnstown, Pa. 15095. 

'54 

The Rev. Rodger E. Rohrbaugh has 
accepted a call to be pastor of Christ 
Lutheran Church. Milton, Pa. He 
was formerly pastor of St. Paul's and 
Christ Lutheran Church, both in 
York County. 

/. "Mike" Rising is now assistant 
director of physical plant at Susque- 
hanna. Most recently he was an in- 
structor in the Building Construction 
Department of Williamsport (Pa.) 
Community College. 




Each year a number of sons and daughters or other relatives of alumni find 
their way to Susquehanna. Among the bumper crop of nearly 400 freshmen 
now enrolled — the Class of 1972 — are these offsprings, top photo, seated: 
Barbara Ann Benion I Harold '39 and Katherine Dietterle Benion '41), Diane 
M. Reitz i The Rev. Daniel '48 and Evelyn Wilhour Reiti x'48>. Hazel A. Gelnett 
'Arthur A. H. Gelnett '30 1. Standing: Gregory H. Fertig I Franklin E. Fertig 
'47), Frederick M. Topper 'Mary Barnes Topper '37), Jeff Winter I Robert 
Winter '48 1, Kimberly Y. Jones 'Mary Emma Yoder Jones '41), Charles G. 
Norbert 'Chester P. Norbert x'38', Timothy W. Bingaman 'Dorothy Wagner 
Bingaman '47). Robert Reilly 'Frederick F. Reilly x'45' was missing when 
the camera clicked. Other relatives, bottom photo, first row: Pamela Bressler, 
Susan Siegrist, Susan Steigelman, Connie Bickel, Louise Brophy, Susan Seaks, 
Pamela Wrigley, Elaine Schall. Second row: William Van Ness, Allen Miller, 
Cynthia Beck, Valerie Fisher, Lynn Williams, Karl Meyer, George Williams. 
Third row: Walter Payne, Edward Horn, Dalton Savidge, David Mangle, Tommy 
Petro. Fourth row: Joe Mertz, Tom Bohner, Paul Cain, Fred Neece. Fifth row: 
Dennis Wolfe, Jim Spriggle, Steve Bender, Andrew McCrea, Dave Dunn, 
Dennis Frey. 



FALL 1968 



15 





/ k'^/$* • a 






- 



O'HARA 



The Rev. Stuart H. Lengel is serv- 
ing as Chaplain of the 52nd Combat 
Support Group (ADC), Suffolk 
County Air Force Base. N.Y. 11978. 

Arthur C. Stamjel has been general 
manager of the Aetna Casulty and 
Surety Co., Milwaukee, Wis. for the 
past year. He was previously located 
in Shreveport, La. 

'56 

LCDR John D. Yeich, Chaplain, 
USN, was awarded the Navy Com- 
mendation Medal with the Combat V 
on September 23 at San Francisco 
Bay Naval Shipyard. The medal was 
presented in recognition of service 
with the 7th Marine Regiment on 
Hill 55 near Danang, Vietnam. Chap- 
Iain Yeich completed his 12-month 
tour in Vietnam in July, and in late 
August began an assignment at the 
San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard, 
Vallejo. Calif. His wife, the former 
Janet Gemer, and their three children 
live at 621 Danrose Dr., Vallejo, 
Calif. 94590. 

'57 

The Rev. Dwight A. Huseman re- 
signed from Christ The King Luth- 
eran Church, Franklin Park, N.J. to 
become pastor of Z i o n Lutheran 
Church, Riverside, N.J. His wife is 
the former Sandra Kimmel x'60. 

Leonard L. Quick has been pro- 
moted to line adjuster, supervising 
medicare for the Pittsburgh office of 
Travelers Insurance Co. He and his 
wife, the former Barbara Mattern 
x'58, and family are living at 548 
Idlewood Rd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15235. 

'51 

LCDR William R. Hand is attend- 
ing the German Armed Forces Staff 
College in Hamburg, West Germany. 
He will be there for two year. 

Vernon V. Hoover was named Bell 
Telephone Company's Bucks district 
manager. He will coordinate the 



company's operations in the Bucks 
area from company centers in Levit- 
town and Doylestown, Pa. 

James A. Keiser was promoted to 
Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy. 
He is supply officer of an LPA Trans- 
port and on his present tour of duty 
deploys to the Mediterranean Sea. 
His wife and family live in Norfolk. 
Va. 

'59 

Ronald G. Aller was elevated by 
Mutual of New York to accounting 
systems specialist and named a junior 
officer of the life and health insur- 
ance company. He will be respon- 
sible for the mechanization of ac- 
counting systems in MONY's control 
division. 

Roger A. Holtzapple of Lewisburg, 
Pa. has been promoted to the rank 
of Major in the Marine Corps Re- 
serve. He belongs to the Harrisburg 
Unit. 

x # 59 

Larry D. Potteiger is with Schick 
Electric, Inc. as senior systems an- 
alyst in Lancaster, Pa. Until last 
April, he had been with the Dauphin 
Deposit Trust Co.. Harrisburg, for 
eight years. 

'60 

Dr. Carlton B. Smith is an assistant 
professor of history at Fairmont (W. 
Va.) State College. His wife is the 
former Jacqueline Gantz '62. 

The Rev. Edward P. Strayer is on 
leave of absence from the faculty at 
Texas Lutheran College, and is work- 
ing toward his Ph.D. in philosophy 
at the University of Nebraska on a 
graduate teaching assistantship. He 
and his wife, the former Alice Taylor 
'62, are at 3411 Frost Court, Lincoln. 
Neb. this year. 

'61 

Glenn R. Bowman has taken a 
position with the Carpenter Steel Co. 
in Reading, Pa. as statistical quality 
control engineer. He and his wife, 
the former Carol Hertz x'63, and two 
boys are living in Shillington. 

Dr. Richard E. Derrick has com- 
pleted his assignment with the U.S. 
Navy Dental Clinic and has his own 
practice in Morristown, N. J. 

William E. Ecenbarger was one of 
50 United Press International corres- 
pondents from bureaus across the na- 



tion to cover the Democratic National 
Convention. He resides with his wife 
in Harrisburg but covers news all 
over the East. His sister Kathi is now 
a Susquehanna sophomore. 

x'61 

Carol Bansner McCord is reading 
supervisor in the Manchester (Mass.) 
Schools. She and her husband have 
returned to the East after a period of 
time in California. 

'62 

Philip M. Clark is a research spec- 
ialist in the Urban Studies Center of 
Rutgers University. He also is a 
member of the Co-Adjunct faculty 
of the Graduate School of Library 
Service, New Brunswick, N.J. 

The Rev. James A. DeLong has 
accepted a call as pastor of First 
Lutheran Church, Tyrone, Pa. He 
and his wife, the former Grace 
Toothacker '67, and daughter moved 
this fall. 

H. Sheldon Home was promoted 
to supervisor in the claim depart- 
ment at the Reading (Pa.) Casualty 
and Surety Division office of Aetna 
Life and Casualty. He served as a 
claim representatvie at Reading for 
the past six years. 

William H. Kahl was appointed 
controller of Selinsgrove Motors, Inc. 
He was formerly with the Pennsyl- 
vania Electric Co. in Johnstown, Pa. 
as senior internal auditor. 

x'62 

Jack E. Forry is associated with 
communications work in New Delhi. 
India, for the U.S. Department of 
State. He and his family expect to 
return Stateside during the summer 
of 1969. 

'63 

James Blessing is on leave of ab- 
sence from the Susquehanna faculty 
to continue study toward his Ph.D. in 
political science at the State Univer- 
sity of New York at Albany. 

Capt. Robert S. McKee is now 
stationed at Kelly AFB in Texas. A 
logistics staff officer, he is assigned 
to a unit of the Air Force Logistics 
Command. H e previously served 
at Bien Hoa AB. Vietnam. 

x'63 

Gerald F. Kling graduated from 
Purdue University in June and now 



16 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



holds an assistantship at Cornell 
University where he is working to- 
ward his master's degree in agronomy. 

'64 

Lynn Pfister Knight is now in her 
fifth year of teaching French at 
Locust Valley (N. Y.) Intermediate 
School. Since graduation, she has 
earned graduate credits at Laval Uni- 
versity. Quebec, Canada; The Sor- 
bonne, Paris, France; and St. John's 
University, Jamaica, N.Y. 

Capt. William E. Lindsay Jr. is an 
aircraft commander of RF 4C Phan- 
tom Jet in Vietnam. His wife, the 



former Sally Schnure '65, is teaching 
senior English in Camp Hill, Pa. 

Paul S. Peyakovick has joined Eli 
Lilly and Co. as a sales representa- 
tive in Ossining, N.Y. He recently 
was a biologist for the U.S. Army 
Medical Research Unit in San Fran- 
cisco. He served as a biological 
science research assistant with the 
U.S. Army in 1964-66. 

Capt. Joseph "Skip" O'Hara 111 
is on temporary duty with the 4133rd 
Bomb Wing at a forward base in the 
Western Pacific. A Strategic A i r 
Command navigator, he flies almost 
dailv B - 5 2 Stratofortress bombing 





r P 

i} <I P.. 

s \ hum. 



<*2r V 



The New England Band Camp at Oakland, Maine, has become quite a gathering 
place for Susquehannans. Taken last summer, this photo shows, front: Robert 
Stibler '70, boys' counselor, a music major from Garwood, N.J.; James Steffy, 
trombone instructor since 1960 and a member of the camp's Board of Trustees, 
head of the S.U. Music Department. Second row: Richard Semke '69, kitchen 
staff, music major from Hempstead, N.Y.; Carolyn Tritt '68, girls' counselor, 
now teaching music in West York Area Schools, York, Pa.; Mrs. Steffy and the 
Steffy children, Jimmy, Johnny and Susie. Third row: Randy Gehret '69, boys' 
counselor, music major from Highspire, Pa.; Mrs. James Sandahl, head girls' 
counselor and wife of Jim '64 (missing from picture), assistant head boys' 
counselor who teaches junior high music in Woodbridge, N.J.; Robert Summer 
'63, voice instructor and a member of the S.U. music faculty; Mrs. Robert 
Summer, piano instructor; Mrs. James Stoltie, camp office staff; Dr. James 
Stoltie, saxophone instructor, former S.U. music faculty member now at Potsdam 
I N.Y.) State University; Carl Moyer '63 assistant director of admissions at Sus- 
quehanna, who was visiting the camp. The New England Band Camp, in opera- 
tion since 1937, serves about 200 school-aged students during the eight-week 
session. Directors are Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Booth of Groton, Conn. In recent 
years, a number of other University students and alumni have also served on 
the camp staff. 



missions against enemy targets in 
Southeast Asia. Skip is permanently 
assigned to the 99th Bomb Wing at 
Westover AFB, Mass. where his wife, 
the former D. Arlene Roberts, is 
teaching elementary music in Chi- 
copee Falls. 

x'64 

Kenneth Mease has joined KDKA- 
TV as a weekend sports reporter and 
news producer. He previously was 
with WBTV in Charlotte. N.C., 
where he was an on-the-air news re- 
porter. 

'65 

Lt. S t a c e y L. Bottiger recently 
completed an advanced course in di- 
recting aircraft by radar for air-to- 
air refueling operations. He has been 
assigned to Pleiku Air Force Base. 
Vietnam. He is the son of the Rev. 
Dr. Martin C. Bottiger 34 hc'68. 

E. Ann Gerding is now working in 
Honolulu as the director of St. 
Andrew's Cathedral Pre-School. 

Lt. jg. Milton M. Kuhn, recently 
promoted from ensign, is in charge of 
communications for a squadron of 
nine ships. He is stationed off the 
coast of Vietnam. 

Kennetha A. McCarthy is an ed- 
itorial assistant with Biosciences In- 
formation Service in Philadelphia. 

William C. Pearce is an assistant 
national bank examiner for the U.S. 
Treasury Department. 

Lt. Karl E. Westerville is a mem- 
ber of the Pacific Air Forces and is 
stationed at Ching Chuan Kang AB, 
Taiwan. 

x'65 

John H. Shaw 111 has purchased 
an interest in the Raymond C. Erd- 
ley Funeral Home, Lewisburg, Pa. 
He is also associated with the John 
H. Shaw Funeral Home in Milton. 
He was recently commissioned a sec- 
ond lieutenant in the Pennsylvania 
National Guard and is assigned to 
the 911th Medical Company in Wells- 
boro, Pa. 

'66 

Lt. Larry D. Bashore is stationed 
outside of Danang, Vietnam and is 
flying helicopters. He was commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in the 
Marine Corps at Quantico, Va. in 
1966, received his wings at Pensa- 
cola in April 1968 and then went to 



FALL 1968 



17 



. here he trained 
squadron before leav- 
ing fc n in August. His ad- 
1 Lt. Larry D. Bashore, HMH 
463 MAG 16 1st MAW, FMF PAC, 
F.P.O: San Francisco ,Calif. 96602. 
Larry's wife, the former Priscilla 
Clark, is teaching junior and senior 
high vocal music in Camp Hill (Pa.) 
High School. Her address is 3294-A 
Wakefield Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 17109. 

Robert L. Duerr and his wife, the 
former Catherine J. Richards, now 
reside at 711 Anderson Ave., Drexel 
Hill, Pa. Bob is a research physicist 
with the M and T Co., Philadelphia, 
and is attending graduate school at 
Temple University working for his 
master's in physics. Cathy is first 
flutist with the Springfield Symphony 
Orchestra in Delaware County. They 
have two sons. 

Gretchen A. Goclinour is teaching 
elementary vocal music in the Scotch 
Plains Fanwood (N.J.) Public Schools. 

Lt. Thomas Gresh has been trans- 
ferred to New Cumberland, Pa. For 
the past 15 months he has been as- 
signed to the operation and main- 
tenance office of the U. S. Army 
Transportation Corps at Fort Devens, 
Mass. 



ALUMNI 

WEEKEND 

1969 



Does your class year 

end in 4 or 9? 

If so, there's a 

special reunion for you, 

BUT 

All are welcome 



MAY 2-4, 1969 



Melinda Karns Mancke has accept- 
ed a community relations position 
with the Baltimore Regional Planning 
Council, a state agency concerned 
with residential development, open 
space, transportation, government, 
education, institutional, and residen- 
tial centers, and industrial develop- 
ment in Baltimore City and the five 
surrounding counties. 

David C. Newhart of the Lutheran 
Theological Seminary at Philadelphia 
is serving his pastor internship as- 
sisting the Rev. Dr. John Gensel '40 
lw'63 at St. Peter's Lutheran Church. 
New York City. 

Ted F. Oswald was installed as 
vicar of the Lord God Sabaoth Luth- 
eran Church, Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin 
Islands. He will complete a year of 
service and then return to the Phil- 
adelphia Seminary. 

Samuel A. Stauffer is teaching in 
the high school at Middleburg, Pa. 

Richard E. Talbot is manager of 
the Firestone store in Stroudsburg. 
Pa. He and his wife, the former M. 
Lynn Oelkers, now live in Mt. Bethel. 
Pa. 

x'66 

Janice H. O'Donnell is the high 
school librarian at Greene (N.Y.) 
Central School. She is living at 
Chenango Forks, N.Y. 

Thomas E. Peachey received his 
commission as second lieutenant in 
the U.S. Marine Corps during the 
summer. 

'67 

James A. Anderson was recently 
graduated from a VISTA training pro- 
gram at the University of Oklahoma 
Training Center in Norman. As a 
Volunteer In Service To America, 
he will spend one year working with 
the Economic Opportunity Agency of 
Pulaski County in Little Rock, Ark. 

Dean R. Kennedy is employed as a 
caseworker-social worker for Ancora 
State Hospital, Hammonton, N.J. 

Barbara Brown Troutman is teach- 
ing fourth grade in the Selinsgrove 
Public Schools. 

x'67 

Richard S. Trostle is assistant man- 
ager for the Highland Federal Savings 
and Loan Association of Baltimore. 
His wife is the former Barbara God- 
man. 



"I DO" 



LEWIS -GORRIGOR 

Ann M. Gorrigor to William T. 
Lewis '65, November 20, 1965, Sha- 
mokin. Pa. Bill is completing his 
senior year at the Pennsylvania Col- 
lege of Optometry and expects to re- 
ceive the doctor of optometry degree 
next June. The couple resides at 6032 
N. Warnock St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
19141, with their son, Daniel William, 
born February 29, 1968. 

HAUSER - DANCHO 
Sonya Dancho to Fred R. Hauser 
'64, March 10, 1967. Since last April 
the couple has been in Ecuador where 
Fred is territorial controller for W. 
R. Grace's activities, a paper mill, 
paint factory, Grace Line, and a car- 
ton box plant. Fred was previously 
associated with the American Ex- 
press Co. as division controller of the 
International Freight Division. Ad- 
dress for the next two or three years: 
P.O. Box 186, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 
S.A. 

SHUFELT- SMITH 
Susan L. Smith x'68 to Gordon 
Shufelt Jr., March 18, 1967, Linden 
Presbyterian Church, Linden, N. J. 
Susan also attended Drew University, 
as did her husband, who is now serv- 
ing with the U.S. Navy. Mrs. Shufelt 
is employed by the New England 
Life Insurance Co. Address of the 
couple: 725 Hyde St.. Apt. 6, San 
Francisco, Calif. 94109. 

LATTANZIO - McGOWIN 
Judith Earle M c G ow in '66 to 
Charles Joseph Lattanzio, June 24, 
1967. Judith Ann Challis '66 served 
as maid of honor and Holly Lead- 
beater Jacobs '65 was one of the 
bridesmaids. Judy has been teaching 
7th and 8th grade English at Mon- 
tauk (N.Y.) Jr. H. S. The couple 
lives on Main St., Sag Harbor, N.Y. 
11963. 

SCHNEIDER - MOYER 

Carolyn Ann Mover '63 to the Rev. 
Karl A. Schneider. June 24, 1967. 
Carolyn did graduate work in soci- 
ology and counseling at Temple Uni- 
versity and is currently on the staff 
of the Lutheran Home at German- 
town, Philadelphia. Her husband is 
pastor of Eethanien Lutheran Church. 
The couple resides at 4351 Pechin St.. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 19128. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



SUMMERS -EVANS 

Barbara Irene Evans '65 to James 
Warfield Summers '64, August 26, 
1967, Methodist Church, Honey 
Brook. Pa. Leslie Bridgens Sabin '65 
served as matron of honor and 
William Gerkens '64 was an usher. 
Jim is a C.P.A. with Lybrand, Ross 
Brothers and Montgomery, Philadel- 
phia. Barbara is teaching in the 
Coatesville (Pa.) Area School Dis- 
trict. Address: Golf Club Apt. C-4, 
West Chester, Pa. 19380. 

BENNETT - COMEY 

Ellen Marie Comey '67 to Kenneth 
H. Bennett, April 6, 1968, Pilgrim 
Lutheran Church, Warwick, R.I. 
Joan "Penny" Buck '67 was one of the 
bridesmaids. Since graduation Ellen 
has been a first grade teacher in 
Coventry. R.I., and attending Rhode 
Island College to complete work for 
certification. She plans to continue 
work toward the master's degree in 
elementary education. Mr. Bennett 
attended the University of Rhode 
Island and is a warrant officer can- 
didate in the U.S. Army, stationed at 
Fort Wolters, Tex. Ellen expected 
to join her husband in Texas in No- 
vember. 

ROBERTS - TISCHLER 

Susan Tischler .x'68 to George 
Templeton Roberts, April 1968, Long 
Island, N.Y. Susan plans to return 
to her studies next semester at Ithaca 
College, where she is majoring in 
physical therapy. Mr. Roberts is at- 
tending optometry school. The couple 
resides at Lansing Apts. East, Apt. 
103-C, Ithaca, N.Y. 14850. 

PERLSTEIN - CONRAD 

Margaret J. Conrad '64 to Stephen 
Michael Perlstein, May 19, 1968. 
Margaret is a psychiatric social work- 
er at Pilgrim State Hospital, in charge 
of the family care program. Mr. 
Perlstein is a physical education 
teacher in Brentwood, N.Y. Present 
address: Box 199, West Brentwood, 
N.Y. 11717. 

IONES - WILDASIN 

Kathleen Jane Wildasin x'69 to 
Roger Alan Jones, June 8, 1968, First 
Presbyterian Church, York, Pa. 
Catherine Martin '69 served as maid 
of honor. Both Mr. and Mrs. Jones 
are seniors at the University of Del- 
aware and they live at College Towne, 
Newark, Del. 19711. 

LEE - MYERS 

Sarah Louise Myers '60 to Burton 
Willis Lee III, June 8, 1968, Evan- 



gelical Lutheran Church, Greencastle, 
Pa. The Rev. Roy A. Gutshall '44 
assisted at the ceremony. Mr. Lee is 
a graduate of Fenn College, Cleve- 
land, Ohio and earned the master's 
degree from Springfield College. He 
is an associate director of youth serv- 
ices at the York YMCA. The couple 
lives at 275 W. Market St., York, Pa. 
17401. 

GRIFFITHS - JONES 

Verni Jones to John Robert Grif- 
fiths '68. June 15, 1968. Mrs. Grif- 
fiths is a graduate of East Strouds- 
burg State College. John is teach- 
ing history, coaching football and 
wrestling at Methacton H.S., Fair- 
view Village, Pa. The couple resides 
at 27 W. Fornance St., Norristown, 
Pa. 19401. 

SANDHAM - BRIAN 
Janet Louise Brian '67 to David 
Mathers Sandham '68, June 15, 1968, 
Zion Lutheran Church, Manheim, Pa. 
Glennette Peterson '69 served as one 
of the bridesmaids, Betsy Klose '68 
was soloist. Kenneth Selinger '68 and 
Richard Janes '69 were ushers. Janet 
is a caseworker for the Bureau of 
Children's Services in Lancaster and 
Dave is employed by Sears Roebuck 
& Co. The couple resides at 22 
South Lime St., Lancaster, Pa. 17602. 

LOPARDO - RODGERS 
Diane Rodgers to Nicholas A. Lo- 
pardo '68, June 16. 1968, Methodist 
Church, Massapequa, N. Y. Jimmy 
Hall '68 served as best man, Dean 
Kennedy '67 and Henry DePerro '70 
were ushers. Nick is an administra- 
tive trainee with Equitable Assurance 
Co., Harrisburg. and is serving in the 
U.S. Army Reserve. The couple lives 
at 20 N. Arlington Ave., Apt. 267, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 17109. 

BASKIND - RETZ 

Janice E. Retz x'67 to Andrew B. 
Baskind. The couple resides at B-5, 
420 River Road, Chatham, N. J. 
07928. 

BRIXIUS- BROWN 

A linda Anne Brown '68 to Darryl 
Brixius, June 22. 1968, St. John's 
Lutheran Church. Shiremanstown, Pa. 
Maureen Thomas (Shuey) '68 was 
maid of honor. Alinda is an employ- 
ment interviewer with the Iowa State 
Employment Service, D e s Moines. 
Mr. Brixius, Lebanon Valley College 
'68, is pursuing graduate study in 
chemistry at Iowa State University, 
Ames, and is a graduate teaching as- 



sistant. Address: 410 Pammel Court, 
Ames, Iowa. 50010. 

ANDREWS - SIMMERS 
Kathleen Elizabeth Simmers '67 to 
Donald Eugene Andrews, lune 29, 
1968, First United Methodist Church, 
Phoenixville, Pa. Eileen Worrell '67 
served as maid of honor. Kathy is 
teaching second grade for the Boyer- 
town (Pa.) Area School District and 
working toward the M.Ed, in ele- 
mentary education at West Chester 
State College. Mr. Andrews is a 1967 
graduate of Wilmington (Ohio) Col- 
lege and is with the Gindy Corp., 
Eagle. Pa. Address: Monocacy Farms 
Apt. #4, R.D. #1, Douglassville, Pa. 
19518. 

BARNES -BOWMAN 
Marsha Bowman to Timothy R. 
Barnes '66. lune 29, 1968, First 
Methodist Church of Swissvale, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. Mrs. Barnes is a grad- 
uate of Bucknell University and Tim 
is working on his master's degree in 
divinity at Lancaster (Pa.) Theological 
Seminary. 

MEIXSELL - SAWYER 

Jean Louise Sawyer '68 to SP/4 
Ronnie G. Meixsell, June 29, 1968, 
Nazareth, Pa. Joan Vondercrone '68 
and Pamela Van Dyke '68 served as 
attendants and Sally Davis '68 was 
organist. Jean and her husband are 
in Worms, Germany for a year 
while he completes his service with 
the 76th Army Band. Address: 
RA 11985733, 76th Army Band, 
A. P.O. New York, N.Y. 09058. 

BOWEN - HOFFMAN 

Martha Elizabeth Hoffman to Wil- 
lard James Bowen '69, June 30, 1968, 
United Methodist Church, Freeburg. 
Pa. Mrs. Bowen is a senior at East 
Stroudsburg State College and Bill is 
completing his senior year at Susque- 
hanna. The couple is residing at 207 
W. Chestnut St.. Selinsgrove, Pa. 
17870. 

SMITH - SCHARFF 

Linda Ann Scharff '64 to Gordon 
Robert Smith, July 13. 1968, First 
Presbyterian Church, Metuchen, N.J. 
Joan Henderson Stackhouse '64 served 
as a bridesmaid. Linda is a research 
assistant in the teaching laboratories 
of Rutgers Medical School, New 
Brunswick. Mr. Smith, a C.P.A. , is 
controller of the Consumer Products 
Division, The Singer Co., Elizabeth. 
Address: 76 Sweet Briar Dr., Apt. 10, 
Clark, N.J. 07066. 



FALL 1968 



19 



GREBE -SLOAN 
>le Lee Sloan '67 to John Fred- 
erick Grebe '65, July 13, 1968, Grace 
Lutheran Church, Pottstown, Pa. Joan 
Hoffman Zerhe '67 served as a brides- 
maid, and John Norton '67 was an 
usher. Carole is an auditor for the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia 
and John is a management trainee 
with the Philadelphia National Bank. 
The couple lives at Barclay Square 
H-20, 1600 Garrett Road, Upper 
Darby. Pa. 19082. 

McMANUS - SHOMPER 

Dorothy J. Shomper '62 to Bruce 
L. McManus. July 27, 1968, Holy 
Spirit Church, Sharon Hill, Pa. Sarah 
Blaskovitz '62 served as maid of 
honor. Dorothy is teaching English 
in Sharon Hill High School and her 
husband, a graduate of the University 
of Detroit, is a design engineer 
for Boeing - Vertol. Address of 
the couple is 107 Rutgers Ave., Apt. 
G-l, Swarthmore, Pa. 19081. 
MICHAEL - KUMP 

Margaret Anne Kump to Richard 
Frederick Michael '68, July 27, 1968, 
St. Mark Lutheran Church, Hanover. 
Pa. Jane Kump Kindon '63 was one 
of the attendants and among the 
ushers were Wayne Gill x'68 and 
Richard Haines '68. Mrs. Michael is 
completing her senior year at West- 
ern Maryland College and Richard 
is a student at the Lutheran Theo- 
logical Seminary at Gettysburg. The 
couple resides at 113 Seminary Ave., 
Gettysburg, Pa. 17325. 

ROSS - HAUSER 

Judith Ann Hauser x'66 to James 
Norman Ross. July 27. 1968, St. 
Pauls" United Church of Christ, Sel- 
insgrove. Pa. Judith is a graduate of 
Roycemore Girl's School and Na- 
tional College of Education, both in 
Evanston, 111. Mr. Ross, a graduate 
of American International College, 
earned the master's degree in eco- 
nomics from the University of Con- 
necticut. Address of the couple is 
2020 Bancroft Way, Apt. 403, Berk- 
eley, Calif. 94704. 

JACKSON - HORTON 

Denise Clair Horton '68 to Barry 
Richard Jackson '68, August 2, 1968, 
Grace Presbyterian Church, Jenkin- 
town, Pa. Susquehannans in the wed- 
ding party were Patricia Mehrer Wil- 
limas '68, Nancy Rosengarten Palmer 
x'68, Jeanette Mover '67, Sandy 
Woolston Gross x'69, and John Hale 
'68. Denise is a caseworker and in- 



terpreter for the Delaware County 
Board of Assistance, Chester, Pa. 
Barry is a management trainee with 
the Equitable Assurance Co., Phila- 
delphia. They live at Omega Court 
II. Apt. G-2, 426 S. Springfield Rd.. 
Clifton Heights. Pa. 19018. 
TRENERY-STRINE 
Jeanne Marie Strine to Franklin 
George Trenery Jr. '63, August 3, 
1968, St. Mary's Church of the Im- 
maculate Conception. Mrs. Trenery 
is a graduate of the Mercy Hospital 
School of Nursing, Baltimore, and a 
staff member of Mercy Hospital. 
Frank served four years in the U.S. 
Army and was released as a captain. 
He is a sales representative for In- 
ternational Business Machines, Tow- 
son. The couple is living at 42 
Acorn Circle, Courthouse Square. 
Baltimore, Md. 21204. 

ACKER -COLEMAN 
Ruth Coleman '59 to Dr. Frank E. 
Acker, August 3, 1968. Luther Place 
Memorial Church, Washington, D.C. 
Ruth was formerly parish deaconess . 
at St. Matthew's Lutheran Church, 
Bloomsburg. Pa. Her husband re- 
ceived the Ph.D. degree from Car- 
negie - Mellon University and is an 
electrical engineer in the ocean tech- 
nological branch of the Naval Re- 
search Laboratory. Address: 5300 
Oakcrest Drive, Apt. 203, Oxon Hill, 
Md. 20021. 

HAINES - STING 
Dorothy Louise Sting to Richard 
Stephen Haines '68, August 10, 1968, 
Advent Lutheran Church, Mt. Eph- 
raim, N.J. Jack Campbell '67 served 
as best man and Richard Michael '68 
was an usher. Peter Jarjisian '69 was 
soloist. Mrs. Haines is teaching sec- 
ond grade in the Moorestown (N.J.I 
School District. Rick is associated 
with the Atlantic Richfield Co. as a 
development specialist. The couple 
lives at 191 Matlack Dr., Maple 
Shade, N.J. 08052. 

VAK - FETTEROLF 
Sharon Lee Fetterolf '68 to Stephen 
M. Vak '68, August 10, 1968, Trinity 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, Johns- 
town, Pa. Frank K. Fetterolf '48 
presented his daughter in marriage. 
Judith Billman '69 served as maid of 
honor and one of the ushers was 
Gerald Miskar '68. Sharon is teach- 
ing English and Steve is teaching 
mathematics and coaching in the 
Schuylkill Haven School District. The 
couple is residing in Cressona, Pa. 



TUNIS -MICHENER 

Catherine Louise Michener '68 to 
Harris B. Tunis. August 10, 1968. 
Among the bridesmaids were Kathleen 
Blunt '68 and Kathleen Baynes '68. 
Cathy is attending the Graduate 
School of Library Science, Drexel 
Institute of Technology, under a Fed- 
eral Fellowship. Her husband is a 
graduate of Bucknell University with 
the class of 1966. Address: 40 Jeffer- 
son St., Apt. 4, Media, Pa. 19063. 
KOPF - WEBSTER 

Hope Webster '65 to Kenneth Jay 
Kopf, August 17, 1968, Milton, Pa. 
The couple resides at 52 S. Fourth 
St., Lewisburg, Pa. 17837. 
ANTUNES - ZANNIE 

Marilyn Harriet Zannie '67 to Jose 
Antunes, August 17, 1968. Maryann 
Paylor Grube '67 served as one of the 
bridesmaids and Robert Miller '67 
was soloist. Both Marilyn and her 
husband have teaching assistantships 
while working for their master's de- 
grees in mathematics at Miami Uni- 
versity of Ohio. Mr. Antunes is a 
1965 graduate of Bridgewater (Mass.) 
State College. The couple is residing 
at Twightwee Lodge. Apt. 27, Arrow- 
head Dr., Oxford, Ohio 45056. 
WEST - AICHELE 

Carole Ann Aichele x'64 to Rickey 
L. West, August 17. 1968, St. Mark's 
Lutheran Church. Oaklyn, N. J. 
Carole earned the B.S. degree in home 
economics at Drexel Institute of Tech- 
nology and is teaching at Abraham 
Levitt Jr. H. S.. Willingboro, N.J. 
Address of the couple is 15 Stokes 
Ave., Medford, N.J. 08053. 

BINGAMAN - HAYHURST 

Sandra Irene Hayhurst to David 
Paul Bingaman '68, August 17, 1968, 
First United Church of Christ, Sun- 
bury, Pa. Dave's father, the Rev. 
Adam P. Bingaman '29, assisted with 
the marriage ceremony. Walter L. 
Siegel '66 served as one of the ushers 
and Jean Hill Delsite '51 was organ- 
ist. Mrs. Bingaman is a registered 
nurse and was formerly on the staff 
of Geisinger Medical Center. Dave 
is working toward the master's de- 
gree at Sacramento State College. 
The couple resides at 2500 Fair Oaks 
Blvd.. Apt. 18, Sacramento, Calif. 
95825. 

YINGLING - SWARTZ 

Lois Ann Swartz '66 to William 
L. Yinglina '67, August 24, 1968, 
First United Presbyterian Church, 
Millerstown, Pa. Burner Swartz '40 



20 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



gave his daughter in marriage. Mar- 
garet O r t h VanName '66, Joanne 
Drake Morris '66, and Barbara Brown 
Troutman '67 were bridesmaids. 
William Dalious '66 served as one 
of the ushers. Lois is an elementary 
band director in the Springfield 
Township School District, Delaware 
County, and is studying for a master's 
degree in music education at West 
Chester State College. Bill is a soph- 
omore at Temple University School 
of Medicine. The couple resides at 
132 Cascade Road. Springfield. Pa. 
19064. 

BERAN - VIERTEL 

Carol L. Viertel '66 to Rudolph J. 
W. Beran. August 24. 1968. St. Luke 
Lutheran Church. Baltimore, Md. 
Nancy Oliver '68 served as a brides- 
maid. Carol, who earned the master 
of arts in teaching degree, was an 
English teacher in Baltimore County. 
Mr. Beran is teaching statistics at the 
University of California. Address of 
the couple is 1907 Haste St.. Apt. 2C. 
Berkeley. Calif. 94704. 

McDANIEL-CROW 

Lorma Crow '68 to Robert A. 
McDaniel. August 24. 1968. Sally 
Feitig '68 served as a bridesmaid and 
Barbara Mundy '67 was the soloist. 
Lorma is teaching elementary vocal 
music in Prince George's County, 
Md. The couple resides at Apt. 31, 
7700 Adelphi Rd.. West Hyattsville, 
Md. 20783. 

VACCARO - LEONARD 

Barbara Ann Leonard '68 to John 
Adams Vaccaro, August 24, 1968, St. 
Pius X Church, Selinsgrove, Pa. 
Among the attendants were La n i 
Pyles '69 and Marsba Tamke '68. 
Mr. Vaccaro is a graduate of Lafay- 
ette University. Address: 120 E. 90th 
St.. Apt. 14-B. New York, N. Y. 
10028. 

LABANOSKY - STOCKALIS 
Barbara Ann Stockalis '64 to John 
P. Labanosky Jr.. August 26, 1968. 
Barbara is teaching mathematics at 
the Charles H. Boehm H.S., Yardley, 
Pa., and is adviser to the student 
newspaper. She hopes to complete 
her master's degree at Villanova 
University next June. Mr. Labanosky 
is with the Department of the Army. 
Address: 21 Patricia Lane, Levittown. 
Pa. 19057. 

LAUVER - ERNST 
Sharon D. Ernst '63 to Joseph R. 
Lauver '68, September 1, 1968 in 
Gettysburg, Pa. Joe is doing graduate 



FALL 1968 



work in philosophy at Harpur Col- 
lege. State University of New York 
at Binghamton. and Sunny is a case- 
worker for medicaid in Broom 
County. The live at Montrose R.D., 
N.Y. 18801. 

BANSCHBACH - KARL 

Susan V. Karl to Martin W . Ban- 
schbach '68, September 7. 1968, St. 
Paul's Lutheran Church. Shaver- 
town, Pa. Richard Rex '68 served as 
best man and Gregory Phillips '68 
was one of the ushers. Mrs. Bansch- 
bach is a 1967 graduate of Geisinger 
Medical Center and is an R.N. in 
the intensive care unit of Radford 
Community Hospital. Martin is at- 
tending Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
Graduate School, working toward the 
Ph. D. in biochemistry. Address: 
University Village, Lot #20, Blacks- 
burg, Va. 24060. 

EBERT - ALEXANDERSON 

Linda V. Alexanderson '66 to F. 
Warren Ebert '66, September 14. 
1968. Lutheran Church of the Resur- 
rection, Mt. Kisco, N.Y. Margaret 
Jager '66 served as a bridesmaid and 
Lewis Darr '66 was best man. Linda 
has been associated with a publish- 
ing firm and Warren is with the 
Police Department in Millburn. N. J. 
The couple resides at 204 Globe 
Ave.. Union, N.J. 07083. 

JOHNSTON - BOWERS 

Mary Catherine Bowers to Michael 
Lee Johnston x'64, September 14, 
1968, St. Mark's Lutheran Church, 
E 1 y s b u r g , Pa. The Rev. Kenneth 
Zimmerman '58 assisted at the ser- 
vice. Michael is a senior at Hiram 
Scott College. Address: Student 
Union Box 245. Hiram Scott College. 
Scottsbluff. Neb. 69361. 

SHEAFFER- ZE1DERS 

Donna Lou Zeiders '67 to Harold 
David Sheaffer, September 1968, Ald- 
ersgate United Methodist Church, 
Mifflintown, Pa. This is Donna's 
second year of teaching elementary 
vocal music in the Kutztown Area 
School District. She is also the choir 
director at St. John's Lutheran 
Church. Mr. Sheaffer is a junior at 
Kutztown State College, majoring in 
biology, and plans a career in teach- 
ing. The couple resides at 467 East 
Main St., Kutztown. Pa. 19530. 
WILLINSKY-GORKA 

Bernadine A. Gorka to Leonard A. 
Willinsky '68, September 21, 1968. 
Mrs. Willinsky is with Bell Telephone 
Co. in Lancaster, Pa. and Leonard is 



21 



a news commentator for WSBA, Lan- 




caster. The newlyweds were recently 




injured in an auto-truck collision, but 




both are showing improvement. Ad- 




dress: 1476 A Manor House Lane, 




Lancaster, Pa. 17603. 




PERSING - MacELWEE 




Paulet W. MacElwee to Lynn E. 




Persing '67. September 21, 1968, First 




Presbyterian Church, Shamokin, Pa. 




Among the ushers were Walter Rice 




11 '66 and Thomas Long '68. Lynn 




was graduated from the University of 




Pennsylvania School of Allied Med- 




ical Professions and is now a staff 




physical therapist at the Embreeville 




(Pa.) State Hospital. His wife, a 




graduate of Shippensburg State Col- 




lege, teaches in the Williston Town- 




LIKE SPORTS? 




Many S.U. sports fans find these 




schedules handy. Clip and save it. 




Follow your Crusaders every chance 




you get — at home or away. 




▼ ▼ ▼ 




1968-69 




SUSQUEHANNA 




Winter Sports Schedules 


VARSITY BASKETBALL 




D 4 Lycoming 


H 


D 7 Lehigh 


A 


Dll Scranton 


A 


D14 Wagner 


H 


D17 Juniata 


A 


D18 Scranton 


H 


D20 Wilkes 


A 


D27-28 Highspire Tournament 


A 


J 6 Albright 


H 


J 9 Philadelphia Textile 


A 


J 1 1 Delaware Valley 


H 


J 18 Ithaca 


A 


j F 1 Wagner 


A 


j F 3 American 


H 


F 5 Albright 


A 


F 8 Elizabethtown 


A 


j F 12 Juniata 


H 


j F 18 Lebanon Valley 


A 


| F19 Upsala 


H 


| F22 Wilkes 


H 


j F26 Rider 


H 


WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 




F 5 Millersville State 


H 


F 1 1 Lebanon Valley 


H 


F13 Marywood 


A 


F18 Albright 


A 


F20 Wilkes 


H 


F27 Luzerne CCC 


H 


M 1 Bloomsburg State 


A 



o o ! District, Paoli. The 
at Golf Club Apart- 
1100 West Chester Pike, Apt. 
H-46, West Chester. Pa. 19380. 

. AMBROSE - HESCOX 
Janice M. Hescox to the Rev. Al- 
fred A. Ambrose '64, September 21. 
1968, First Lutheran Church, Al- 
toona. Pa. Al is associate pastor of 
Trinity Lutheran Church, Milton, Pa. 
Mrs. Ambrose is a graduate of the 
Altoona Hospital School of Nursing. 
Address: 340 Upper Market St., Mil- 
ton, Pa. 17847. 

WALTER - MONTGOMERY 

Mrs. Hazel G. Montgomery to 
Charles H. Walter '36, October 6, 
1968, Grove United Methodist 
Church, West Chester, Pa. The Rev. 
James Morris '52 officiated at the 
wedding ceremony. Mrs. Walter, a 
former University nurse at Susque- 
hanna, is a graduate of the Altoona 
Hospital School of Nursing. The 
groom is an accountant at the Selins- 
grove State School and Hospital. The 
couple lives at 211 University Ave., 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 



Advanced Degrees 





WRESTLING 




D 7 


Washington 


A 


Dll 


Eastern Baptist 


H 


D14 


American 


H 


J 8 


Juniata 


H 


J 15 


Bucknell 


H 


F 8 


Delaware Valley 


A 


Fll 


Lebanon Valley 


A 


F22 


Philadelphia Bible 


H 


F25 


Wagner 


A 


M 1 


Dickinson 


A 


M 7-8 


MAC Tournament 
JV BASKETBALL 


A 


D 4 


Lycoming 


H 


Dll 


Scranton 


A 


D14 


Bucknell Frosh 


H 


D17 


Juniata 


A 


D20 


Wilkes 


A 


J 6 


Albright 


H 


J 9 


Philadelphia Textile 


A 


J 11 


Delaware Valley 


H 


F 3 


Williamsport Com. 


H 


F 5 


Albright 


A 


F 8 


Elizabethtown 


A 


F12 


Juniata 


H 


F18 


Lebanon Valley 


A 


F19 


Luzerne CCC 


H 


F22 


Wilkes 


H 


F26 


Stewartstown 


H 



Ronald L. Acker '64 received the 
master of education degree from 
Bloomsburg State College in June. 
He majored in biology and, with a 
National Science Foundation grant, 
studied last summer in Aspen, Colo. 
under the sponsorship of San Diego 
(Calif.) State College. He teaches bi- 
ology at Warrior Run Area Joint 
School. Turbotville. Pa., and is mar- 
ried to the former Joyce Riegel '65. 
They are the parents of three sons. 

Alan Bachrach Jr. '64 was awarded 
the doctor of veterinary medicine de- 
gree from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania School of Veterinary Medicine 
on May 20. He is serving a 15-month 
internship at the Henry Bergh Me- 
morial Hospital, New York City. 

Timothy R. Barnes '66 earned the 
M.A. from Bucknell University in 
June and is now working toward the 
master's degree in divinity at Lancas- 
ter (Pa.) Theological Seminary. 

Richard J. Biedermann '64 received 
the master of business administration 
from Drexel Institute of Technology 
and is with the Penn Mutual Life 
Insurance Co. His wife is the for- 
mer Gail Hart '64. 

The Rev. Charles L. Bomhoy '52 
earned his master of theology degree 
from Princeton Theological Seminary, 
having majored in the history of 
Christian doctorine. Pastor Bomboy 
received the B.D. from United Theo- 
logical Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, and 
is pastor of Westminster Presbyterian 
Church, Phillipsburg, N.J. 

James R. Bramer '64 earned the 
bachelor of divinity from the Luther- 
an Theological Seminary at Gettys- 
burg and was ordained by the Upper 
New York Synod. Pastor Bramer 
serves the three-church parish of St. 
Paul and Trinity. Confluence, and 
St. John. Addison, Pa. His wife is 
the former Barbara Miles x'66. 

Roger Bitriak '64 received the de- 
gree of doctor of dental medicine 
from the University of Pennsylvania 
in June. 

Philippa Hughes Campbell '65 has 
been awarded the certificate of pro- 
ficiency in occupational therapy. She 
is a member of the American Occupa- 
tional Therapists Association and is a 
registered occupational therapist at 



22 



the Selinsgrove State School and Hos- 
pital. 

Nancy Corson Carter '65 received 
the master's degree in American 
civilization from the University of 
Iowa. Her thesis title: "Henry David 
Thoreau and Andrew Wyeth in the 
tradition of Romantic Naturalism." 
She and her husband are both work- 
ing toward the Ph.D. 

R i c h a r d E. J. Caruso '65 was 
awarded the master's in business ad- 
ministration by Bucknell University 
in 1966. Majoring in applied eco- 
nomics, he was a graduate teaching 
assistant in business, secretary-trea- 
surer of the Graduate Association, 
and a member of Delta Mu Delta, 
national honor society in business 
administration. He is with Price 
Waterhouse & Co. in Philadelphia 
and is currently working toward the 
C.P.A. certificate. 

Antony W. Colombet '64 received 
the master of science degree in math- 
matics for secondary teachers from 
Bucknell University. He is in his 
third year of teaching at the William 
Penn Charter School, Philadelphia, 
where he also coaches the varsity 
swimming team. 

Stanley E. DeCamp '58 earned the 
bachelor of divinity degree from the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Philadelphia and was ordained by 
the New Jersey Synod. Prior to his 
seminary studies, Stan earned the 
M.A. at Lehigh University in 1959 
and taught American history at Lake- 
wood (N.J.) H.S. for seven years. He 
is pastor of Zion Lutheran Church, 
Ridgefield, N.J. 

Ronald B. Deibler x'64 was award- 
ed the master's degree in education 
last February by Shippensburg State 
College. He is in his third year of 
teaching science in the Lower Middle- 
town Township School District near 
Carlisle, Pa., and is junior high 
basketball and senior high JV team 
coach. 

Karen Frable Donald '64 received 
the M.Ed, in elementary education 
from Lehigh University in 1967. She 
is teaching in the Easton-Forks Joint 
School System, Easton, Pa. 

Paul W. Ernst '65 received the 
master of social welfare degree from 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Case Western Reserve University and 
is a group therapist at Summit County 
Children's Home, Akron, Ohio. He 
works with 500 boys, has special re- 
sponsibilities for twelve of them, with 
whom he and his family (wife and 
Thomas Andrew, born March 15. 
1968) live in a cottage. 

Ralpli W . Ferraro '60 received the 
master's degree in business adminis- 
tration from Wagner College. In- 
structor in physical education at 
Wagner, he also is head baseball and 
assistant football coach at S.U.'s 
sister Lutheran College. He and his 
wife, the former Helen Harding '60, 
have two daughters, Lisa and 
Michelle. 

Warren W. Gass Jr. '64 earned the 
master of science degree in wildlife 
management from Pennsylvania State 
University in 1967. He studied under 
a U.S. Public Health Service Air Pol- 
lution Training Stipend and special 
fellowships. He teaches earth and 
space science on the junior high level 
in the Selinsgrove Area Joint H.S. 
system. 

M. Jane Gelnett '64 recieved the 
doctor of osteopathy degree from the 
Philadelphia College of Osteopathy. 
She is interning at Sun Coast Hos- 
pital, Largo, Fla. 

AOC Robert W. Goddard '66, now 
working toward a commission as a 
naval pilot at the Naval Air Station. 
Pensacola, Fla.. earned the master of 
arts degree in political science from 
the University of Vermont last June. 

Elwood B. Hippie Jr. '63 received 
the bachelor of divinity degree from 
the Lutheran Theological Seminary 
at Gettysburg and was ordained by 
the Nebraska Synod. Pastor Hippie's 
thesis was entitled, "The Jewish Meal 
and The Church's Eucharist: A Study 
in the Influence of the Jewish Prayers 
on the Prayer of Thanksgiving." He 
is pastor of Zion Lutheran Church. 
Sutton, and Saron Lutheran Church. 
Saronville, Neb. 

Daniel O. Hoy '55 earned the bach- 
elor of divinity degree from the Luth- 
eran Theological Seminary at Gettys- 
burg and was ordained at The United 
Lutheran Church, Wolfe's Crossroads, 
Sunbury R.D. 1, The preacher was the 
Rev. Celo V. Leitzel '45; the Rev. 
Wayne P. Lupoll '52, Dean of the 
Sunbury District, presented the can- 
didate for ordination. The Rev. Wil- 
liam F. Bastian '54 also participated 
in the service. Dan taught German 



and American history in Sunbury H.S. 
and earned the M.A. at Pennsylvania 
State University before entering the 
seminary in 1965. He is pastor of 
Trinity Lutheran Church, Deer Park 
Road, Westminister. Md. and is mar- 
ried to the former Judy DeHamer. 
The couple has a daughter. Mary 
Margaret, born August 9, 1968. 

Harvey A. Horowitz '64 received 
the doctorate of medicine degree from 
Temple University School of Med- 
icine. He is serving his internship 
at Abington Memorial Hospital and 
in July 1969 will enter the Medical 
Corps of the U.S. Navy. He and his 
wife, the former Ricki Handler, have 
two children, David and Lara. 

Margaret E. Jager '66 earned the 
master's degree in social work from 
the Florida State University Gradu- 
ate School of Social Work last March. 
She is a psychiatric social worker at 
the Virginia Treatment Center for 
Children in Richmond, Va. 

Edward L. Jones '61 received the 
bachelor of divinity degree from the 
Conservative Baptist Theological 
Seminary. Denver. Colo., in 1967. 
He is president of the Student Aid 
Foundation which he founded and is 
also teaching and counseling high 
school dropouts in Denver. 

Barry L. Kauffman '63 earned the 
master's degree in mathematics from 
Bucknell University in 1967. He is 
chairman of the mathematics depart- 
ment at Penn Manor School District, 
Millersville. Pa., is married to the 
former Dianne Bickle. and the father 
of two young sons. 

Sara Myers Lee '60 received the 
master's degree in music education 
from Pennsylvania State University in 
1964. She is music supervisor in the 
Central School District. York, Pa. 

Thomas W. Lewis x'41 received 
the Ed.D. from George Washington 
University. His dissertation was en- 
titled. "An Investigation of Certain 
Factors which Affect the Morale of 
Public School Teachers of the Shik- 
ellamy School District, Northumber- 
land County, Pa." He earned the 
M.S. from Bucknell University in 
1950, is assistant principal and guid- 
ance counselor. Montgomery County 
Public Schools. Rockville, Md. 

Donald C. Lindenmuth '67 earned 
the M.A. in philosophy from Penn- 
sylvania State University and is 
teaching philosophy and humanities 
at the Schuylkill Haven Campus of 



Penn State. During summer terms 
he will be working for the Ph.D. at 
Northwestern University. 

Robert B. Mancke '65 received the 
master of science degree in public 
health, specializing in health educa- 
tion, from the University of Massa- 
chusetts in 1967. His thesis was en- 
titled. "An Understanding of the Pro- 
visions of Health Insurance for the 
Aged in a New England Community." 
He is a public health educator with 
the Maryland State Department of 
Health. 

David L. Martin x'63 was awarded 
the bachelor of divinity degree by 
the Lutheran Theological Seminary 
at Gettysburg and was ordained by 
the Central Pennsylvania Synod. He 
is pastor of the Good Shepherd Lu- 
theran Church, Goldsboro. N.C. 

Marjorie Blair Matson '63 earned 
the master of education degree in 
guidance and counseling from Ship- 
pensburg State College and is teach- 
ing at Carlisle (Pa.) Jr. H.S. 

Peter L. Matson '65 received the 
bachelor of laws degree from Dick- 
inson School of Law. At graduation, 
he was given the American Jurispru- 
dence Award for excellence in Fed- 
eral Income Taxation II. He has 
passed the State bar examination and 
is serving his clerkship with A. 
Thomas Wilson. Esq., Lewisburg, Pa. 

Raymond L. McColgan '66 was 
awarded the M.A. in education by 
the University of Akron. He is a 
member of the National Teachers 
Corps, working with underprivileged 
children in the Hough area, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Marjorie Wolfe McCune '43, as re- 
ported in Susquehanna Note, received 
her Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State 
University. On the Susquehanna fac- 
ulty fince 1959. she is associate pro- 
fessor of English, currently head of 
the Department, and also chairman 
of the editorial board of Susquehanna 
University Studies. Dr. McCune is 
married to the Rev. John C. '37, 
pastor of Mt. Zion Lutheran Church. 
Hughesville, Pa. 

Kay Schucker Mundis '66 earned 
the M.A. in classics from Ohio State 
University. She teaches Latin in the 
accelerated program at Huntingdon 
(Pa.) Area H.S. 

Lawrence E. Mundis Jr. '66 was 
awarded the master of arts by Ohio 
State University. A specialist in mod- 
ern European history, he is an in- 



FALL 1968 



23 



;\ at Juniata College. 

Francis Allen Nace '62 was award- 
ed a master's degree in mathematics 
at Bucknell University. He also took 
courses at Newark State Teachers 
College and attended Stevens Institute 
of Technology for three years on a 
National Science Foundation Grant. 
Last summer he taught in the Rutgers 
Upward Bound program and since 
1962 has been a mathematics teach- 
er in Lakewood (N.J.) H.S. 

Thomas M. Peischl '65 was award- 
ed the master's degree in special ed- 
ucation by Temple University in 1967. 
He has taught in Philadelphia and 
been with the Fidelity Bank, is now 
serving in the U.S. Air Force and 
studying Arabic at the Defense Lang- 
uage Institute-Presedia of Monterey, 
Calif. Wife Trudy is with him in 
Monterey. 

Margaret Conrad Perlstein '64 re- 
ceived the master of social work de- 
gree from New York University and 
became a certified social worker in 
1967. She is a psychiatric social work- 
er at Pilgrim State Hospital, in charge 
of the family care program, also is a 
child therapist at the Brentwood 
(N.Y.) unit of Suffolk County Mental 
Health Clinics and a consultant to 
the family and personal guidance cen- 
ter in Smithtown, N.Y. 

Harry L. Powers '60 received the 
M.A. in education, specializing in the 
area of personnel and guidance, from 
Seton Hall University. He had been 
teaching and coaching at Chatham 
(N.J.) H.S. and now has a full-time 
position as guidance counselor. 

Donald J. Seiple '64 was awarded 
the B.D. degree from the Lutheran 
Theological Seminary at Gettysburg 
and was ordained by the Central 
Pennsylvania Synod. He is pastor of 
St. Stephen Lutheran Church, New 
Kingstown, Pa. 

Ruth Sparhawk, former director of 
women's physical education activities 
at S.U., was awarded the Ph.D. de- 
gree in health and physical education 
from Springfield College. Dr. Spar- 
hawk is director of women's physical 
education at Augustana College, Sioux 
Falls, S.D. 

David L. Stocum '61 earned the 
Ph.D. from the University of Penn- 
sylvania. The degree was awarded 
in the field of developmental biology 
by the Department of Zoology. Dr. 
Stocum is assistant professor of zo- 





CJZUSADEfi SCOBEBOm 








FALL 


1968 






su 




Opp 




CROSS COUNTRY 






FOOTBALL 




su 




Opp 


27 


Otterbein 


26 


16 


King's 


47 


6 


Western Maryland 


33 


41 


Millersville State 


19 


13 


Bloomsburg State 


13 


17 


Bloomsburg State 


38 


6 


Ithaca 


24 


36 


Gettysburg 


19 


9 


Upsala 


16 


15 


Elizabethtown 


50 


17 


Lycoming 


13 


37 


Dickinson 


24 





Juniata 


40 


30 


Lebanon Valley 


25 


6 


Wagner 


16 


33 


Delaware Valley 


23 


7 


Delaware Valley 


14 


27 


Juniata 


28 


Wo 


n 2 Lost 6 Tied 1 


20 


Albright 


35 








24 


Scranton 


31 




SOCCER 






Won 6 Lost 5 







Elizabethtown 


6 


WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY 


2 


Drew 


1 





Bucknell 





3 


Dickinson 





1 


Lancaster Club 


2 


2 


Messiah 





3 


Wilkes 





1 


Franklin & Marshall 





4 


Bloomsburg State 








Wagner 


3 


1 


Lock Haven State 


2 


2 


Lycoming 


5 





Dickinson 


3 





Upsala 


1 


1 


Shippensburg State 


2 


3 


Gettysburg 


1 


3 


Penn State 


3 





Philadelphia Textile 


4 * 


1 


Lebanon Valley 


2 





Wilkes 


5 


Won 2 Lost 5 Tie<l 


2 





Bucknell 


2 




JV FOOTBALL 






Won 5 Lost 7 




21 


Stevens Trade 


27 








14 


Lycoming 


13 




JV SOCCER 




23 


Western Maryland 


8 





Bucknell 


5 


6 


Johns Hopkins 


16 





Dickinson 
Won Lost 2 


1 


7 


Bucknell 
Won 2 Lost 3 


20 



ology at the University of Illinois, en- 
gaged in teaching and research in de- 
velopmental biology. He and his wife, 
the former Cynthia Berry '63, are 
parents of a son, Richard B., born 
November 27, 1965. 

Wendel Stuck x'64 transfered from 
Susquehanna to Temple University to 
complete three years of additional 
study in the School of Pharmacy. 
He is a pharmacist for Rea & Derick 
Inc., Milton, Pa. He married the 
former Lois Geise and the couple 
has three chlidren, Gregg, Wendy, and 
Jeff, who was born September 11, 
1968. 

Kathye Wasson Unglaub '64 earn- 
ed the M.Ed, degree from the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh in 1967. She is 
teaching ninth grade algebra at Wil- 
son High School, West Lawn, Pa. 
Her husband, Alfred '65, has a new 
position as industrial engineer with 
Carpenter Steel Co., Reading, Pa., and 
is also attending Lehigh University 



working toward the master's in busi- 
ness administration. 

John M. V ought Jr. '64 received 
the bachelor of divinity degree from 
the Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Gettysburg and was ordained in 
Christ's Lutheran Church, Lewisburg. 
The Rev. Lester J. Karschner '37 
served as liturgist and the lector was 
the Rev. Robert J. N. Walbom '64. 
John is pastor of Union Deposit 
Lutheran Parish, Hershey, Pa. His 
wife is the former Joyce Maire Bur- 
rell and they are the parents of two 
children, Mark and Joy. 

Vaughn A. Wolf '67 earned the 
master's degree in counselor educa- 
tion at Pennsylvania State University 
in March and became a counselor at 
the Selinsgrove State School and 
Hospital. In October he was promot- 
ed to head of the Industrial Therapy 
Department, a new program initiated 
for hope of rehabilitation for men- 
tally retarded residents of the school. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



SU Sports 



by RON BERKHEIMER 




If* 



Despite the graduation last spring of Rick Eppe- 
himer, Susquehanna's basketball team should match 
or improve on its 1967-68 record of 8-14. Eight 
victories and 14 defeats may not be anything to 
write home about, but it was the Crusaders' best 
showing in five years. 

Eppehimer, who averaged 28 points a game 
during his four varsity seasons, will be missed. "We 
can't rely on his great shooting any longer," said 
coach John Barr. "We'll have to do it as a team." 

Barr believes, though, that guard Barry Bob- 
lick and forwards Irv Miller and Ed Scherer will 
give S.U. an adequate scoring punch. Miller (6-5), 
Scherer (6-3) and center Barry Llewellyn (6-6) also 
are strong rebounders. 

* * * 

Susquehanna's wrestlers, on the other hand, 
have never learned the agony of frequent defeat. 
Their sport is the university's newest and S.U. has 
turned in surprisingly good 4-3 and 6-4-1 records 
during its first two years. 

The bubble may be broken this winter, al- 
though Bill Bechtel in the 123-pound class, Lane 
Kaley (130), Heister Linn (160) and Tom McGeoy 
(167) can be expected to have winning records as 
individuals. All four did last season and Bechtel 
climaxed a brilliant freshman year with a fourth- 
place finish in the Middle Atlantic Conference 
tournament. He was undefeated — but had two 
draws — in dual meet competition. 

However, Susquehanna doesn't seem to be as 
strong in the other weight classes this season and 
will have its troubles against better balanced teams. 

Halfback Bill Guth is the first recipient of the 
Clyde R. Spitzner Memorial Trophy, which is to be 
awarded each year to the football team's most val- 
uable player. Guth led the Crusaders in scoring 
with 44 points and was second in rushing with 378 
yards. He also caught 10 passes for 59 yards and 
returned 10 kickoffs 189 yards. 

Fullback Bill Merz was the leading ground 
gainer with 419 yards. Both he and Guth are 



juniors from Erie, Pa. Sophomore end Don Camp- 
bell was the top receiver with 21 catches for 284 
yards and had a punting average of 34.4. Defensive 
standouts included junior guard Henry DePerro, 
the team's busiest tackier with 53 tackles and 40 
assists, and senior end John Arthur. Center Jim 
Page and guard Bob Schofield are the only other 
players who will be lost through graduation. 

Coach Jim Hazlett was hoping for a better 
record than the 2-6-1 which goes into the archives, 
but the Crusaders were a young team and they 
played much better than they had during the dis- 
astrous 1967 season. Poor performances against 
Juniata and Western Maryland could be contrasted 
with good defensive efforts in the Lycoming victory 
and in losses to Wagner and Delaware Valley. The 
offense, however, never overcame the lack of an 
experienced quarterback and a breakaway runner. 

$ $ $ 

A former professional goalie now living in Sel- 
insgrove served as a volunteer assistant coach to the 
soccer team, which had a 5-7 record. Alex Soh- 
onyay, who played pro ball with teams in Cleve- 
land, Philadelphia and New York, spent hours work- 
ing with S.U. goalies Don Paterson and Howard 
Hankin. Coach Neil Potter believes Paterson, a 
sophomore, is one of the best in the conference. 

Other defensive standouts were fullback Mark 
Stevens and Duane Brookhart. Tim Belotti was the 
leading scorer. Seven of Susquehanna's eleven 
starters were sophomores. Co-captains Jerry Book 
and Rich Pfeifer are the only graduating seniors. 

Freshmen Jeff Karver, Dave Scales and Greg 
Dye led the cross country team to a satisfying 6-5 
record during a rebuilding season. Senior team 
captain Keith Bance and sophomore Dave Ros- 
borough were the only returning lettermen. 

Losing three games by one goal, the women's 
field hockey team finished its season with a 2-5-2 
record. Center halfback Carol Smith and goalie 
Beth Wrigley were named to the first team of the 
Mid-East all-star squad. Both are seniors. 



FALL 1968 



25 



Bom Crusaders 



To . Peler and Nancy Zimmerman 
Ramaglia '63, a son, Kurt Lee, April 
9, 1968. 9 White Oak Drive, Livings- 
ton, N.J. 07039. 

To Robert L. '59 and Linda Traub 
Fiscus '61, a daughter. Melinda Chris- 
tine, May 15, 1968. Audit manager 
for Price Waterhouse and Co. since 
1966, Bob has transferred from the 
Pittsburgh office to the newly open- 
ed office in Bridgeport. Conn. P.O. 
Box 155. Huntington Station, Shelton, 
Conn. 06484. 

To Joseph L. and Judith Beery 
Carter '66, a daughter. Timbrel June. 
June 27, 1968. 66 South Main St., 
Northfield, Vt. 05663. 

To C. Stanley '56 and Margaret 
Webber Millard '54, a daughter. 
Cynthia Anne, July 15, 1968. Cynthia 
has a brother, Stanley 13, and a sis- 
ter, Debbie 10. 4 Putter Drive, Shep- 
hard Hills, Wescosville, Pa. 18090. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ronald B. Deib- 
ler x'64, a daughter, Melicia Sue, 
July 26, 1968. R.D. #1, Shughart 
Ave., Boiling Springs, Pa. 17007. 

To Edward F. and L y n W y s e 
Eider x'66, their second daughter, 
Jennie Ruth, July 27, 1968. First 
daughter, Joanne Lyn. was born July 
22, 1966. Mr. Euler is a philosophy 
student at California State. 2 2 40 
Mariondale Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 
90032. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James B. Peters 
'49, a son, James Joshua, August 1, 
1968. Mrs. Peters is the former Peggy 
Lou Saylor and a teacher in the South 
Williamsport Area H.S. System. K- 
town Garden Apartments C-ll, Kutz- 
town, Pa. 19530. 

To Robert C. '65 and Mary Schalles 
Cairns '66. a daughter, Laura Ellen, 
August 10, 1968. Bob is a cost ac- 
countant for Trailco Manufacturing 
and Sales Co., Hummels Wharf, Pa. 
P.O. Box 34, Freeburg, Pa. 17827. 

To Charles E. and Maxine Lipkin 
Marple '65, a son, Kirk Jonathan, 
August 24, 1968. Mr. Marple is an 
instructor in the Lehigh University 
Demonstration School, while study- 
ing for his doctorate in elementary 
education. He is a 1965 graduate of 
Muhlenberg College. 860 N. Sher- 
man St., Allentown, Pa. 18103. 



To Gene and Donna Bair Long 
x'62, a daughter, Dawn Ann, Septem- 
ber 1968. Dawn has a sister, Brenda, 
and twin brothers, Curtis and Doug- 
las. 909 Third Ave. and Horst St., 
South Lebanon, Pa. 17042. 

To Curtis E. and N a n c y Bams 
Shilling '65, their second child, a son, 
Craig Curtis, September 11, 1968. 20 
Fiske Ave.. Bradford, Pa. 16701. 

To Dr. Max M.-K. and Madeline 
Roye Z u n g x'62, a son Michael 
M.-K, September 12, 1968. Michael's 
sister Rebecca was three years old 
on October 2. Dr. Zung is co-chief of 
anesthesiology at Providence Hos- 
pital, Washington, D.C. 6532 Divine 
St., McLean, Va. 22101. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Leone E. Re 
hon'68, their third daughter, Steph- 
anie Anne, September 14, 1968. Mr. 
Re, an instructor in French at Sus- 
quehanna, is on sabbatical leave this 
year. R.D. #1, Selinsgrove, Pa. 
17870. 

John E. V '61 and Harriet Gear- 
hart Fries '61, a son, Matthew Allen, 
September 24, 1968. Jack is an in- 
structor in music at S.U. Box #204, 
Kreamer, Pa. 17833. 

To Lt. William L. and Dana 
Wilson Mosteller '61, a son, John 
Paul, September 1968. Lt. Mosteller, 
a U.S. Navy officer, is doing gradu- 
ate work at the Naval Postgraduate 
School and will receive his advanced 
degree in June 1969. Box 2100, U.S. 
Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, 
Calif. 93940. 

To David J. '64 and Barbara Claf- 
fee Schumacher '63, a daughter, 
Lauren (Laurie) Jeanne, October 13, 
1968. 3103 Sheffield Dr., Cinnamin- 
son, N.J. 08077. 

To Jeremiah B. and Joyce Arnold 
Post '60, their first child, a son, Jon- 
athan Edward, October 14, 1968. 
4613 Larchwood Ave., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 19143. 

To Neil O. and Marion Houser 
Main '64, a daughter, Lori Ardath, 
October 16, 1968. Mr. Main teaches 
mathematics and computer service in 
Kitchener - Waterloo Collegiate. 202 
Hilliard Ave., Waterloo, Ontario, 
Canada. 

To Robert N. '65 and Janet Clark 
Watts '65, a daughter. Heather Mel- 
anie, October 18, 1968. Bob is work- 
ing on his Ph.D. in business admin- 
istration at Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity. Box 356-E, R.D. #2, Belle- 
fonte. Pa. 16823. 



deaths 



J. Barner Rine '07, Winter Haven, 
Fla., January 29, 1968. 

Victor J. '34 and Margaret Haus- 
man Marietta '34, Blandensburg, Md., 
March 1968. Both school teachers, 
they died from injuries received in 
an automobile accident. 

Mary Hazel Smith Shannon '17, 
Reedsville, Pa., April 27, 1968. Mrs. 
Shannon was a secretary for the 
Pennsylvania Department of Health 
in the Lewistown office. Among her 
survivors are her husband, Merle R. 
x'/S; a granddaughter, Lucy North 
x'62; and grandson through marriage, 
C. Ray Hackenberg '61. The Rev. 
Reide E. Bingaman '23 officiated at 
the funeral services. 

Mrs. Ernestine S. Connor, Aiken, 
South Carolina, spring 1968. Mrs. 
Connor was head resident of Seibert 
Hall at S.U. from 1956 until 1962. 

Bertha Knapp Mohney, Allegan, 
Mich., June 5, 1968. Mrs. Mohney 
was the wife of the Rev. Earl Mohney 
'17 and with their family had cele- 
brated their 50th wedding anniversary 
June 23, 1967. In addition to Pastor 
Mohney she is survived by four 
children, including Earl Jr. x'43. 

Maude Decker McCormick x'09, 
State College, Pa., June 14, 1968. 

David Dumnire '21, Indiana, Pa., 
July 6, 1968. He received the M.Ed, 
from the University of Pittsburgh 
and taught school for more than 40 
years. He was a member of the high 
school faculty of Indiana from 1929 
until his retirement in 1963. 

Herbert C. Strunk, Shamokin Dam, 
Pa., July 22, 1968. He is survived 
by his wife, the former Sarah Luck 
'21. 

Martha Ertel Schumacher '27, New 
York City, July 23, 1968. A former 
school teacher in her native Williams- 
port, Pa., she had been president of 
the Women's Fellowship of Broadway 
Church and a member of the Board 
of Churchwomen United of Manhat- 
tan. Her daughter. Ann Schumacher 
Vanderslius '54. preceded her in 
death. 

Dr. Ralph P. Matter x'05. Cov- 
ington, Pa., July 23. 1968. Dr. Mat- 
ter also attended the University of 
Pittsburgh and received the M.D. de- 
cree from Jefferson Medical School. 



26 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Calvin E. Gresh, Northumberland. 
Pa.. July 25, 1968. Among his sur- 
vivors are a daughter, Carol Gresh 
Black '63; her husband, James C. 
Black '63; and a son. Lt. Thomas R. 
Gresh '66. 

The Rev. Dr. Paul M. Kinports '14, 
Clearwater, Fla., July 28, 1968, from 
injuries received in an automobile 
accident. Dr. Kinports was well 
known throughout Lutheranism as a 
longtime executive secretary of the 
Luther League of America, editor 
of The Luther League Review, and 
author of many published articles. 
He served pastorates in Hershey and 
Western Pennsylvania, South Caro- 
lina, and Florida, and retired after 48 
years in the ministry in 1966. He 
earned his B.D. at the Lutheran The- 
ological Seminary at Philadelphia and 
was conferred with Susquehanna's 
doctor of divinity in 1937. His wife, 
who survived the same accident, is 
the former Keathe Shields x'14. 

Lorraine Kelly Bruhaker '59, Sel- 
insgrove. Pa., August 6. 1968, who 
was killed in a car-truck collision. 
She was employed on the social ser- 
vice staff at the Selinsgrove State 
School and Hospital and was also a 
part-time instructor in sociology at 
Susquehanna. Specializing in psy- 
chiatric casework, she earned her 
master's degree at the University of 
Pittsburgh School of Social Work in 
1965. She is survived by her hus- 
band, Lester L. '59, a son, Philip; and 
her parents. Her pastor, the Rev. 
Celo V. Leitzel '45 of First Lutheran 
Church, Selinsgrove, officiated at 
the funeral services. 

Mary Elizabeth Neidig Korten '15, 
Sunbury, Pa., August 13, 1968. Mrs. 
Korten was a member of Zion Luth- 
eran Church and the Order of the 
Eastern Star. She majored in voice 
at Susquehanna. 

George W. Schrey Ac'16, Selins- 
grove, Pa., August 23, 1968. A farm- 
er for most of his life, he was a 
member of St. Paul's Lutheran 
Church and active in the Men's Bible 
Class. 

Merle F. Ulsh, Port Trevorton. 
Pa., September 15, 1968. A well- 
known Selinsgrove area farm equip- 
ment dealer and turkey producer, he 
was the father of Merle F. Jr. '55. 

Dr. Henry A. Barnes he '65, New 
York City, September 15, 1968. Traf- 



fic commissioner in New York City 
since 1961, he formerly filled similar 
posts in Denver and Baltimore. He 
was famous throughout the world as 
an expert in solving big-city traffic 
problems. He was Susquehanna's 
Opening Convocation speaker in 1965, 
when the University conferred him 
with the honorary doctor of public 
administration degree. 

Conrad Richler hc'44. Pine Grove, 
Pa., October 3, 1968. One of 
America's foremost novelists, winner 
of the 1951 Pulitzer Prize for fiction 
for "The Town" and the 1960 Na- 
tional Book Club Award for "The 
Waters of Kronos." Dr. Richter at- 
tended the old Susquehanna Academy 
just after the turn of the century 
while his father. John Richter, was 
studying for the Lutheran ministry 
at the University's seminary. The 
father's career as a country parish 
pastor was immortalized in "A Simple 
Honorable Man." published in 1962. 
A literary giant. Richter was widely 
acclaimed as a careful researcher and 
an expert interpreter of early Amer- 
ican speech and folkways, particularly 
of the Pennsylvania Dutch, the 




Conrad Richter, at right, with Presi- 
dent G. Morris Smith at 1944 Com- 
mencement when S.U. conferred the 
author with the doctor of letters 
degree. 

Indians of Pennsylvania and the 
Southwest, and the pioneers of the 
West. He held honorary degrees from 
the University of New Mexico, 
Lafayette College, Temple University 
and Lebanon Valley College as well 
as Susquehanna. 

Ruth Sailor Ashby, Selinsgrove, Pa., 
October 4, 1968. Her husband, the 
Rev. Paul Ashby '31, recently retired, 
survives. Chaplain George N. Young 
'27 officiated at funeral services. 



POSTSCRIPT 



by Buss Carr 



Freshman parties were again a big success in '68, with attendance by freshmen 
and upperclass students better than ever. My sincere "thank you" to all who 
helped, especially the hosts and hostesses: Harry and Virginia Doss Butts, both 
'48; Herb '51 and Floris Gityer Hains '50; Henry '39 and Betty Johnston Keil 
'38; Dr. Larry '31 and Mrs. Fisher; Dave '64 and Barbara Claffee Schumacher 
'63; Bob '53 and Margaret Brady Wyllie '56; Bill '53 and Peggy Henderson 
Davenport '60; Hannah Pitner '28 and Mr. Lambert; Ed and Blanche Forney 
Rogers, both '42; Dr. George and Claire Haggerty Backer, both '54. Special 
thanks to Linda Rolston '71 who hosted a party for us at the last minute. 

The Lehigh Valley District Club held a meeting in Allentown on October 
12 with 31 in attendance. Dr. Nevin Shaffer '49 presided and introduced 
Dr. Weber as the Football Coach of the Century. Both Dr. and Mrs. Weber 
gave the group a first-hand account of progress on campus. 

Have you made your contribution to the Annual Fund? We're in the 
final phase of the current campaign and if you're not sure why we are asking 
for support, why not come back and see what's happening to YOUR school. 
Expansion must continue if we are to provide the education only a small school 
can offer. While much has been done, there is still much to do. And it can 
be done with the help of ALL alumni — not just 20 percent. 



FALL 1968 



27 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 

Susquehanna University 

Sclinsgrove, Pennsylvania 

17870 




FOSTMASTER: Please notify if undelivered. 

Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



3*-Z> 



WINTER 1969 



Susquehanna Alumnus 





hi 



asnions 



Change 



* 



Alumni Day is now Alumni Weekend. Maybe you can't get to all the events on the three-day schedule, 
but there's something for everyone beginning with Friday's Golf Tournament and May Queen Coronation 
. . . Two performances each of Cole Porter's "Anything Goes" and "Macbeth," the 20th annual Shakes- 
pearean Festival . . . Reunion meetings and the Awards Luncheon . . . Tours of the new buildings . . . 
Sports for spectators and social hours for participants . . . A Country Club Dinner-Dance . . . And a 
Church Service in Susquehanna's beautiful Chapel Auditorium with Dr. Bill Janson '44 preaching the ser- 
mon. Watch for the special mailing and plan now to come back this year. 



ALUMNI WEEKEND AT SUSQUEHANNA 



MAY 2-4, 1969 



*]osephine Pijcr '34, May Queen 35 years ago, posed at the lisli point 
rectangular, new circular. She is now Mrs. R. R. Bleakley Jr. of 
Franklin, Pennsylvania. 



then 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol. 38 



WINTER 1969 



No. 2 



Sometimes it's difficult to put a quarterly 
magazine together, to decide what should be 
given how much coverage, to achieve a balance 
between strictly news items, "think" pieces, 
promotional articles, and so forth. Day-to-day- 
news items, after all, mean little to alumni 
who live near the campus and read them in 
their daily newspapers at the time they occur. 
But they are read eagerly by alumni not locat- 
ed nearby. We must serve both. 

Some college alumni magazines have of 
late been moving away from the parochialism 
which characterized them in the past by pub- 
lishing more articles of general interest and 
cutting down — even eliminating — the "per- 
sonals'" about their own people. We believe 
that the nature of the alumni publication — 
indeed, its reason for being — makes a certain 
amount of parochial content necessary. Yes, 
we will run articles of general interest from 
time to time, when they are relevant to higher 
education and Susquehanna and when they are 
available to us. And we welcome suggestions 
from our readers. But we don't intend to try 
to do things that newspapers, commercial 
magazines and other kinds of specialized pub- 
lications can do much better than we could. 

As a general rule, our purpose is to main- 
tain a link between alumni and Alma Mater, 
and a link from alumni to other alumni. We 
therefore will continue to deal primarily with 
what happens on campus and what is planned, 
with what alumni are doing, and with subjects 
of special interest to Susquehannans. 

This particular issue includes a 20-page in- 
sert which was originally released with cover 
and program pages on February 1 at the Ten- 
Year Night dinner marking Dr. Weber's an- 
niversary as President. Sufficient copies were 
printed so that all alumni could share in the 
occasion. Its message should be a source of 
pride to everyone. 

On the cover are Dr. and Mrs. Weber with 
the presentations made to them by alumni. 
Characteristically first in many things, alumni 
got the jump on the Board by honoring the 
Webers a week before Ten-Year Night. 



CONTENTS 

Pause to Celebrate . . . and to Look Ahead . . 4 

The Class of "68 Reports 11 

The First Ten Years of the New Susquehanna . 13 

Susquehannans on Parade 33 

"I Do" 36 

Born Crusaders 37 



Webers Honored at Alumni Workshop 



43 



Susquehanna University Alumni Association 

Marlyn R. Fetterolf '23, president; Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42, Dr. Erie I. Shobert 
II '35, vice presidents; Dorothy Turner '36, recording secretary; Chester G 
Rowe '52, treasurer; Dr. John J. Houtz '08, historian; Lawrence M. Isaacs '43, 
Louise Mehring Koontz '35, representatives on the University Board of 
Directors; Simon B Rhoads '30, Jack P. Shipe '40, representatives on the 
Athletic Committee. 



Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1969; Dr. Nelson E. Bailey 
'57, Harry W. Butts Jr. '48, Dr. Lawrence C. Fisher '31, Lynn E. Lerew '63, John 
Yonkondy '36. Term expiring 1970: Timothy E. Barnes '35, The Rev. Dale S. 
Bringman '48, Dr. James C. Gehris '50, Dorothy Eilhardt Gundrum '48, Nancy 
Davis Raab '61. Term expiring 1971: George E. Bantley '41, William C 
Davenport '53, George C. Liddington '54, Dr, Bryce E. Ncodemus '3 ; . 
Shirley A Young '51. 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writers 

RONALD E. BERKHEIMER 

MARGARET F. ERNST 



Entered as second-class matter September 25, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Publish- 
ed four times a year by Susquehanna University. Selinsgrove, Pa. 



WINTER 1969 




Pause 
. . . and 



German Professor Russell Gilbert said 
Gustave Weber was "the right man at 
the right time" as President of Susque- 
hanna. Alan Lovell of the student body 
said the students admire Dr. Weber for 
his constant efforts to improve the Uni- 
versity and the fact that he is always 
ready to meet with students and listen 
to their ideas. Dr. Frederic K. Miller. 
Commissioner for Higher Education in 



Martha Brockway '71 of South Williamsport, Pa., 
president of Associated Women Students, unveils 
the Presidential Portrait at Ten-Year Night. 
Painting was commissioned hy the Board of Directors. 



Erie Shohert '35, as Faculty Affairs chairman for the 
Board, cites a total of 229 years of service 
on the part of 14 faculty and staff veterans as Dean 
Wilhelm Reuning presents recognition plaques to . . . 




Irvin Cray-bill (12 years). Jean Beamenderfer '39 (17 years), George Robison (22 years) 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



elebrate 
x)k Ahead 



Pennsylvania, said it was "quite a feat 
to simply survive ten years as a college 
president in these hectic times." 

The University — Board, faculty, staff 
and spouses — paused to celebrate at 
Ten- Year Night on February 1. Hosted 
b\ the Board of Directors, the group 
assembled to recognize "the administra- 
tion and faculty . . . under the leader- 
ship of President Gustave W. Weber." 

It was the President's 10th anniversary 
of coming to Susquehanna, and there 
was no question that the Weber years 
had brought about a "new Susquehan- 
na." as recounted elsewhere in this mag- 
azine. So the evening was one of many 
tributes to Dr. Weber and his colleagues, 
of taking pride in accomplishment, and 
of glimpsing into what the future might 
hold. 




The SU Family gathers for an informal 
reception in Mellon Lounge 
prior to the testimonial dinner. 




Fred Billman '36 (22 years), Howard DeMott (21 years), Philip Bossart (17 years), Frances Alterman (13 years) 



WINTER 1969 




Dr. Weber greets his mother, Mrs. 
Joseph Weber, and brother, Cmdr. Oscar 
Weber, U.S. Navy chaplain; then 
visits the tables of several Board 
members and other VJPs. Lower left: 
Dr. Richard C. and Isabella 
Horn Klick '34, State Senator 
and Mrs. Preston B. Davis, Howard E. 
and Louise Mehring Koontz '35. 





With Mrs. Frederic K. Miller, wife 
of the speaker, and Congress- 
man Herman T. Schneebeli 
who brought greetings from 
the area community. 



FACULTY AND STAFF VETERANS 
RECOGNIZED FOR LONGEVITY OF SERVICE 



Dr. George M. Robison 
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 



Robert A. Pittello 
Assistant Coach of Football 



Dr. Thomas F. Armstrong Jr. 
Professor of Business Administration 

Frederic C. Billman 
Professor of Music 

Dr. Howard E. DeMott 
Professor of Biology 

Jean B. Beamenderfer 
Associate Professor of 
Business Administration 

Dr. Philip C. Bossart 
Professor of Psychology 

Lamar D. Inners 
Associate Professor of Accounting 



Dr. Jane F. Barlow 
Professor of Classical Languages 

Frances D, Alterman 
Associate Professor of Music 

Irvin Graybill Jr. 
Assistant Professor of 
Business Administration 

Dr. Kenneth F. Mailloux 
Professor of History 

John E. Barr 
Head Coach of Basketball and Golf 

Pauline Lauver 
Manager of Food Services 




Lamar inners (17 years) . 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 





Dr. Howard McCarney presides us toastmaster in 

the Campus Center's main dining room. Woodcarving 
of llie University seal over the mantle is a 
recently installed memorial to the late Griffith 
E. Lewis '69, placed hy his parents. 






Chatting with Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
E. Walz, W. Alfred Streamer 
'26 and. at right, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Lincoln Ray. 





Thomas Armstrong 122 years). Kenneth Maillottx (12 years). Jane Barlow (15 years), Bob Pittello (16 years). 



WINTER 1969 





fit 









Dr. Frederic Miller, Penn- 
sylvania's Commissioner for 
Higher Education, delivers the 
main address. 



Expressing appreciation to the President from 
various segments of Susquehanna's constituency are 
Dr. Russell W . Gilbert for the faculty, Raymond 
P. "Rip" Carman '30 for the alumni. Dr. Louis T. 
Almen for the church, and Dr. John C. Horn hc'65 
for the Board. Below, gifts are presented to Dr. 
Weber by Alan C. Lovell '70 Silver Spring, Md., 
president of Student Senate, for the students, 
and Dean Reuiung for the faculty. 





SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



In his remarks making up the main ad- 
dress. Dr. Miller, a former president of 
Lebanon Valley College, said that the 
finest tribute to be paid Dr. Weber 
would be for "'each of you to quietly 
resolve tonight to work faithfully and 
diligently for the continued progress of 
the University for the next 10. 25 or 
even 50 years." 

The Sunbury Daily Item, in an edito- 
rial by Dr. Harry Haddon hc'63, said 
that under Dr. Weber's dynamic direc- 
tion "goals that staggered the imagina- 
tion have been achieved, and in some 
instances surpassed," but that possibly 
the greatest accomplishment of this 
"decisive decade" has been development 
of the new Susquehanna spirit — "Latent 
possibilities of the beloved and respect- 
ed 1 1 1 - year - old institution have been 
brought to fruition and upon a solid 
foundation of glorious tradition new 
meaning and purpose have crystallized 
hopes for an even more glorious future." 



At right, Dr. Weber receives con- 
gratulations from Synod President 
McCarney ami shares comments 

willi portraitist Hilda Karniol 
of Susquehanna's art faculty. 







At evening's end. President and Mrs. Weber oblige with a family photo in tlie living 
room of Pine Lawn. Son Richard, a Philadelphia patent attorney, is on the left. 
On the right are daughter Carol and her husband, Don McLucas, of Princeton, NJ. 
Below, Dr. and Mrs. Horn and the Webers look over the collection of handsomely 
bound testimonial letters presented as a gift from tlie Board of Directors. 




10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



The Class of '68 Reports 



There were 246 persons who received Susquehanna baccalaureate degrees in 
1968. In response to the usual postal card query. 223 indicated to the Alumni 
Office their present whereabouts and activit). The complete list begins on this 
page, but a cursory breakdown is interesting: Except for those serving in the 
armed forces, only one has been living overseas. The rest, however, are scat- 
tered all across this great land into 27 different states. Nearly half, or 110, are 
located in Pennsylvania. New York has 25 and New Jersey 24. It appears that 
62 are engaged in graduate study, although there are others taking part - time 
graduate work; 63 are teaching: 43 are in some form of business; 24 are in the 
armed forces; 22 are in service occupations; 16 are in accounting and related 
fields. Only 4 are full-time housewives. A few don't fit into these general cate- 
gories and include chemists, technicians, etc. Replies were also received from 
26 former members of the Class of "68. These are listed following the graduates. 



Karen Adams: Graduate study at 
Brooklyn College. The City Univer- 
sity of New York, under a Prospective 
Teacher Fellowship. 

John William Arnold: Graduate 
study in political science. The Amer- 
ican Institute for Foreign Trade. 
Phoenix. Ariz. 

John W. Ayer: U. S. Navy Aviation. 

Linda W. Baehr: Claims representa- 
tive. Social Security Disability Insur- 
ance. U.S. Department of Health, Ed- 
ucation and Welfare. Baltimore, Md. 

Norrine Louise Bailey: Graduate 
study. Syracuse University, with a 
scholarship and part-time responsibil- 
ity in a women's residence. 

Dennis Michael Baker: Social in- 
surance claims examiner. Department 
of Health. Education and Welfare. 
Snyder County. Pa. Married former 
Suzanne Bobb. 

Mercedes L. Baker: Mathematics 
and science teacher. Lower Moreland 
Intermediate School. Huntingdon 
Valley. Pa. 

Richard Allan Baker: Staff accoun- 



tant. Main LaFrentz & Co.. certified 
public accountants. Harrisburg. 

J. Gregory Ballenline: Teacher. 
Clinton (N.J.) State Farm — State Re- 
formatory for Women. Married 
Judith Carol Anderson. 

Martin Wayne Banschbach: Grad- 
uate study, Virginia Polytechnic In- 
stitute, biochemistry research scholar- 
ship. 

Douglas George Bauer: Graduate 
study. Temple University . Intern 
Teaching Program. 

Kathleen Mary Baynes: Working 
toward master's in library science. 
Rutgers University. 

Katharine Welly Beard: Junior re- 
search technician. The Milton S. Her- 
^hey Medical Center. Hershey, Pa. 

Mai > Elizabeth Beeson: Casework- 
er. Sussex County Welfare Board. 
Newton. N.J. 

2 Lt Eric Carl Bergmann: CMR 
Box 2708. Laredo Air Force Base. 
Tex. 78040. Pilot training program. 
L'.S. Air Force. 

W. Dean Bickel: Graduate studs. 



the Lutheran Theological Seminary 
at Philadelphia. 

David P. Bingaman: Working to- 
ward master's degree at Sacramento 
State College in California. 

Susan Elaine Bishop: Teaching 8th 
grade English. Washington Township 
Jr.-Sr. H.S.. Bunker Hill. N.J. 

Gary Lee Bittinger: Manager, W. 
T. Grant Co., Sunbury . 

Kathleen Lois Blunt: Teaching 8th 
and 9th grades English and reading. 
Kennedy Jr. H.S., Pontiac (Mich.) 
City Schools. 

Carl David Bose: At Fort Mc- 
Clellan. Ala. for advanced infantry 
training. In April will become a 
management trainee. International 
Harvester Co.. New Cumberland, Pa. 

Terry Robert Bossert: Cost engi- 
neer. Kelly Construction Co., Quaker- 
town. Pa. 

Carl Raymond Bovaird: Working 
toward M.B.A. at the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

James A. Bowman: Earned the B.A 
at S.U. and in May 1968 was awarded 



WINTER 1969 



the B.S. in mechanical engineering at 
Pennsylvania State University. Grad- 
uate study at California Institute of 
Technology. 

Pfc. James Edward Bowman Jr.: 
'19109, USA AG DPSC. Edge- 
wood Arsenal. Edgewood, Md. 21010. 
Eor three weeks after graduation was 
a statistician. Bureau of the Census, 
Washington, D.C.. when drafted into 
the U.S. Army, where he is in the 
Data Processing Service Center, com- 
puter programming. 

Paul Edward Brill: Inspector, U.S. 
Food and Drug Administration, Phila- 
delphia. 

Barbara Jane Brought: Caseworker, 
Department of Social Services, Child 
Welfare for Baltimore City. 

A linda Brown Brixius: Employ- 
ment interviewer, Iowa State Employ- 
ment Service, Des Moines. 

Monroe A. Brucli: Graduate study 
in counseling at Bucknell University. 
Also working at Laurelton (Pa. I State 
School and Hospital. 

Ens. David Raymond Bull: Damage 
control assistant aboard USS Great 
Sitkin (AE-17), deploying to the Med- 
iterranean. Address: USS Great Sit- 
kin (AE-17), FPO New York, N.Y. 
09501. 

Albert William Byrnes: Graduate 
study, York (Pa.) Hospital School of 
Medical Technology. 

John Bz.dil Jr.: U. S. Naval Air 
Training Program. He received the 
certificate for solo flight and is a 
member of Training Squadron 1, 
NAAS Saufley, Fensacola, Fla. 

Mary Ann Carpenter Orso: Taught 
German at Abington Heights Sr. H. 
S., Clarks Summit. Pa., during the 
first semester. Also took graduate 
study at the University of Scranton. 

Sally Ann Carrill: Working toward 
master's in elementary education at 
the University of Maryland. 

Gail Carter: Welfare caseworker, 
New York City. 

Elizabeth A n n Charles: Teenage 
program director, YWCA, Reading, 
Pa. 

Samuel David Clapper: Attending 
University of Chicago School of Law 
as a candidate for juris doctor degree. 

Anita Gayle Claycomb: Casework- 
er, Department of Public Assistance, 
Philadelphia. 

Erancine Cooper: Teaching English 
Literature, 1 0th and 11th grades, 
Towanda (Pa.) H.S. 

Patricia Corbin Perkins: English 



teacher. DeWitt Ir. H.S.. Ithaca. N.Y. 

Mary Margaret Cramer: Casework- 
er. Welfare Department of Cuyahoga 
County, headquarters in Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Richard John Cromwell: U.S. Naval 
Amphibious Base, Little Creek, Va. 
Also pursuing graduate study at Old 
Dominion College, Norfolk. 

Lorma Crow McDaniel: Teaching 
elementary vocal music. Prince 
George's County, Md. 

Sally L\ nn Curnow: Medical sec- 
retary, Jefferson Medical College, 
Philadelphia. 

Don Edward Dallabrida: Claims 
representative. Reliance Insurance 
Co., Philadelphia. 

Arline Davis Burbank: Returned 
from West Germany and now taking 
courses in computer programming at 
Arizona State University while her 
husband is attending the Thunderbird 
Graduate School for International 
Management at Phoenix. 

Sally Ann Davis: Elementary vocal 
m u s i c teacher. Cumberland Valley 
School District, Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Nancy Ellen Dewsbury: Graduate 
study in political science and inter- 
national affairs under a scholarship 
at the University of Wisconsin. 

Barbara Jean Dick: Teaching at 
Cedar Cliff H.S., West Shore School 
District, Camp Hill, Pa. Plans to be- 
gin graduate studies at Pennsylvania 
State University in the summer. 

Robert B. Donmoyer: Taking pri- 
vate vocal lessons and working as a 
page for Columbia Broadcasting 
Systems, New York City. 

Jennifer Beaumont Downey: Case- 
worker. New York City Bureau of 
Child Welfare. 

Arthur Darryl Ebersberger: Work- 
ing toward M.B.A. at Bucknell Uni- 
versity and a member of the U.S. 
Naval Reserves. 

Elizabeth Elmer Kaujinann: House- 
wife and mother. 

Sharon Ernst Lamer: Caseworker. 
Medicaid, Department of Welfare, 
Broome County. Binghamton, N.Y. 

Ray Henry Ewig: Accountant. 
Ernst and Ernst, certified public ac- 
countants, Buffalo, N.Y. Married 
former Bonnie Berkey. 

Constantine C. Exarhos: Organic 
research. Ortho Pharmeceutical Corp.. 
Somerville, N.J. 

Donald W. Fasold: Assistant man- 
ager, Wickes Corp., Northumberland. 
Pa. 



Sally Elizabeth Feitig: East Strouds- 
burg State College working toward 
teaching credits in elementary educa- 
tion. 

Sharon Fetterolf Vak: English 
teacher, Schuylkill Haven (Pa.) School 
District. 

Ruth Alice Flanders: Mathematics 
teacher. Jefferson Township H.S., Oak 
Ridge, N.J. 

Daniel Micah Fornataro: Elemen- 
tary teacher, Hazleton (Pa.) Area 
School District. Also, pursuing grad- 
uate study in education at Blooms- 
burg State College. 

Janet Katherine Fowler: Librarian 
and manual analyst, Fidelity Mutual 
Life Insurance Co.. Philadelphia. 

Margaret Jane Funk: Caseworker I, 
Connecticut State Welfare Depart- 
ment, New London. 

Karen Ann Geiger: Social studies 
teacher, Indian Crest Jr. H.S., Souder- 
lon. Pa. 

Harold F. Geise: Accountant. Main 
•LaFrentz & Co., Harrisburg. 

James Leslie Geissler: Pennsylvania 
Department of Health. Department 
of Sanitation, Scranton. 

Paul Ray Geisl Jr.: U.S. Army as 
of October 1968. Prior to entering 
the service was employed by Ander- 
son Bakeries, Inc., Lancaster, Pa. 

W a y n e Ross Gibson: Graduate 
study. University of Wisconsin, mem- 
ber of ROTC. 

Peggy Ann Gilbert: Technical as- 
sistant. Commercial Underwriters De- 
partment, Liberty Mutual Insurance 
Co.. Bala Cynwyd, Pa. 

H. Donald Glaser Jr.: Graduate 
study in business administration, Kent 
(Ohio) State University. 

Joanne D e b r a Goglia: Teaching 
junior high English and reading. West 
Snyder Joint Schools, Beaver Springs. 
Pa. 

Lester E . Goodman II: RA- 
11732706. 93rd Co. 9th Stu Bn TCB. 
Fort Benning, Ga. 31905. Entered the 
U.S. Army in June. 

Love Lorraine Cover: Elementary 
and secondary French and English 
teacher. Shikellamy School District. 
Sunbury. 

Gail Ellen Graham: Claims repre- 
sentative. Liberty Mutual, Lynbrook. 
N.Y. 

Louis Bernard Grcenberg: Staff ac- 
countant. Lybrand. Ross Bros, and 
Montgomery. Philadelphia. 

continued on page 38 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



TEN YEARS OF 




SUSQUEHANNA 






Susquehanna University was 100*2 years 
old when on the first of February 1959 
Dr. G. Morris Smith handed the Presi- 
dent's Office key to Dr. Gustave W. 
Weber. For 30 years Dr. Smith had led 
the Board of Directors and faculty in 
consolidating the academic stature of 
the institution and building a solid base 
for future expansion. Now, in a simple 
act, the University passed from one era 
of its life into another. Heilman Music 
Hall (above) had been completed. An 
addition had been built to the Library. 
But, with enrollment at approximately 
500, and with World War II babies com- 
ing of age in a time of increasing de- 
mands upon higher education, it was 
clear that growth in numbers and facili- 
ties would be necessary in the years 
immediately ahead. At left, the first of 
many such pleasant duties for the new 
leader was presiding over groundbreak- 
ing for the Latimer S. Landes Gateway 
at the main entrance to the campus. 






The installation of trailblazer highway 
signs announced the new Susquehanna 
to the public and made it easier for 
strangers to find the campus. The Health 
Center (above) was established in a new- 
ly-purchased house, one of the first of 14 
small peripheral properties acquired dur- 
ing the period. These, together with sev- 
eral larger acquisitions, increased campus 
acreage from 62 to more than 180. 



The look of Susquehanna in the '60s is 
presaged by the graceful main entry and 
University Library. 



Two new fraternity houses were the first buildings to be con- 
structed in Dr. Weber's tenure. Built by. the fraternities on 
University land, they helped relieve crowded conditions in 
dormitories and dining rooms. 




Senator Joseph Clark (center) paid a visit in 1961 to deliver the 
Commencement address and receive an honorary degree. Here, he 
is engaged in conversation with President Weber and John C. Horn 
of the Board of Directors. Over the years, numerous important 
personalities appeared at Susquehanna to enrich the experience 
of students and faculty alike. 





More students meant more liv- 
ing space. This attractive quad- 
rangle is surrounded on three 
sides by Smith and Reed, resi- 
dence halls for women. Total en- 
rollment rose by 140 percent to 
1200 students during the ten-year 
span. Below, athletics were not 
neglected. These new stands were 
erected on the north side of Uni- 
versity Field. Five new intercol- 
legiate sports were organized. 





Zf vx .J9I 




Susquehanna's prettiest coeds brightened the seasons as they served on 
May Court and Homecoming Court. Students took leading roles in the 
accomplishments of the '60s too. Above, they added their talents to 
creation of the Tovvne Room in Gustavus Adolphus Hall. Left, yet another 
fraternity expanded its capacity by building a major addition to its house. 
Other instances included a "paint-in" in one of the older dormitories and 
a student vote to assess themselves an annual fee to be applied toward 
building of the Campus Center. Below, extensions to the north and south 
ends of Alumni Gymnasium provided extra space in this building. 





The Class of 1963 Gateway stands at the northwest entrance 
to Susquehanna and blends in style with entries and lantern 
pillars at other locations. The Marching Brass and Percussion 
(right) became a source of pride, its high quality performance 
typifying that of other musical and theatrical organizations also. 





ra 



7, QIC 



.■* .- >* 







Improving its facilities for the 
study of languages, the Uni- 
versity installed this up-to-date 
language laboratory in Bogar 
Hall. On the lighter side, a 
group of students took up Presi- 
dent Kennedy's physical fitness 
challenge when they walked 
(below) the nearly - 50 miles 
from Selinsgrove to the Harris- 
burg Farm Show. 



J\ ] 






a *s 






„.- jtf 



DJ 



BEUl 




Early in 1964 Susquehanna's new Science Hall (left) be- 
came a reality. Containing 48 laboratories, classrooms 
and offices and featuring 206-seat Faylor Lecture Hall, 
the building filled a critical academic need. Situated just 
east of it (right), old Steele Science Hall took a new lease 
on life when it was completely renovated to become the 
home of the Business Division. The Psychology Depart- 
ment has laboratories on the top floor. 




* 




A fourth new dormitory, this one for 158 men, was erected on the 
West Campus hillside. It was already under construction when 
70-year-old GA Hall (lower left) was destroyed by fire in Novem- 
ber 1964. In addition to housing men, GA had contained a snack 
bar, lounge areas, and post office. Lower right, Susquehanna won 
two conference championships in football in the early '60s and 
headlines were commonplace — but none caused more excitement 
than the story that President Weber had taken over the coaching 
reins after the regular coach resigned with two games remaining 
to be played in 1965. 





Tradition was enriched with presentation of Susquehanna's Aca- 
demic Mace; and refinement of the Alumni Award program made 
possible increased recognition of outstanding graduates and stu- 
dents at the annual Spring Weekend. 




Selinsgrove Hall, the University's original 
building dating from 1858, was given a new 
main entrance and lights. Now an adminis- 
trative center, it was completely renovated 
inside, as were several other older buildings. 




One of the most memorable days of the decade occurred 
November 6, 1966 when the University's unusual Chapel 
Auditorium was dedicated amid much pomp and cere- 
mony. Members of the Board (above) carried chancel 
furnishings in the procession. Below, actor Efrem Zim- 
balist Jr. and Lutheran Church in America President 
Franklin Clark Fry shared in the colorful dedicatory 
festivities. At right, Central Pennsylvania Synod Presi- 
dent Dwight F. Putman took part in placing of the date- 
stone the previous autumn. 






Revolving stage of the Chapel Audi- 
torium contains a permanent chancel 
on one side and performance facilities 
on the other. Lower right, most of the 
1506 seats were filled for the first 
Christmas Candlelight Service held in 
the new building. 






Newest of Susquehanna's major buildings is the Campus 
Center, opened in September 1968. Covering the largest 
area of any campus structure, it contains an 800-seat 
dining room, snack bar, bookstore, private dining and 
meeting rooms, lounges, student activities and recreation 
areas, and other special-purpose facilities. 





Mellon Lounge in the Campus Center is 168 feet long. Music 
listening rooms are located at one end and the director's 
offices are at the other. Arched windows face out across a 
terrace toward the rest of the campus. 



The Conrad Creenhouse, its utilities tied in underground 
with the Science Hall, was built in the fall of 1968. Modern 
and well-equipped, it is a vital adjunct to the biology pro- 
gram and special botanical studies. 




Some statistics can be cited to characterize and 
point up the achievements of the first ten years 
of the new Susquehanna. Already mentioned are 
the fact that enrollment went up from 500 to 
1200 and that campus holdings increased from 62 
to 180 acres. The percentage of increase in other 
categories is even greater, for during the same 
period the University's annual operating budget 
jumped from $686,669 to $3,240,000 . . . 

And total assets increased from $3 million to 
nearly $16 million. Ten entirely new buildings 
were constructed, major additions were built to 
two, complete renovations were made to four and 
lesser work done on others. Construction was also 
done in connection with utilities, roads, parking 
lots, football stands, playing fields, etc. In addition 
to several large tracts of real estate and the build- 
ings situated on them, the University acquired 14 
smaller properties on which 11 buildings remain to 
serve various purposes. Several smaller houses 
were razed. 

At the same time that impressive sums were 
being spent on new buildings and additional land, 
the size of the Susquehanna faculty was being in- 
creased to maintain a favorable 1:12 faculty-stu- 
dent ratio, and the administrative staff was 
strengthened with the coming of a number of 
specialists in certain fields. Faculty salaries more 
than doubled and other staff benefits were greatly 
improved. But all the signs of progress are not 
statistical. 

Physical growth at Susquehanna did not take 
place at the expense of the academic program — 
the two advanced together. Standards were ac- 
tually raised. New students are better prepared 
each year and they represent a greater diversity of 
backgrounds. The liberal arts offerings have been 



sharpened, fringe programs phased out and sev- 
eral new majors added. More and more graduates 
find ready acceptance in finer graduate schools. 
The Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools, when making its periodic 
evaluation of the University in 1964, submitted a 
most complimentary report and even used Sus- 
quehanna as a training ground for persons from 
other institutions who were learning to become 
evaluation visitors. 

Special programs abound. The College Guid- 
ance Clinic, conducted each summer, helps sec- 
ondary school students to prepare for college. 
European seminars add an extra dimension to 
study in several areas. Language students, par- 
ticularly, are encouraged to spend some of their 
time abroad. Scholarships for foreign students 
have been established. 

In keeping with the times and the deepening 
interest on the part of students everywhere in be- 
coming involved in college affairs, Susquehanna 
students are now represented on most University 
committees and the trend is on the increase. As a 
result, there is greater understanding of college 
operations on the part of undergraduates and stu- 
dent wishes are given a fair hearing. An annual 
conference of Board members, facultv, administra- 
tors and student leaders heightens this understand- 
ing by providing a forum for confrontation and 
discussion of mutual concerns. 

The study of religion and campus worship prac- 
tices have both undergone change based on the 
fulfillment of each student's needs. Personal prob- 
lems are cared for through an expanded counseling 
program. 

Ever-mindful of its church heritage, the Uni- 
versity is actively engaged in studies to define and 



determine areas of increased service to the church 
and church-related activities. 

Under the tireless and enthusiastic leadership of 
President Weber, excellent relations with the pub- 
lic exist; the breadth and depth of alumni partici- 
pation has increased; campus-church relationships 



have intensified; the local area and the business- 
industrv community have become enthused about 
the University; Board participation has become 
alive and positive; and these ten years of phe- 
nomenal change portend for Susquehanna a future 
of outstanding potential in higher education. 



The advances of the past decade stand as testi- 
mony to the faith alumni and friends had in the 
future of the University and in the leadership evi- 
denced in achieving this progress. We face the 
next decade with proven leadership and with a 
willingness to assimilate past progress with chal- 
lenging future goals in such a way as to ensure a 
strengthened position for Susquehanna in higher 
education. 

The next ten years will significantly challenge 
the energies of everyone associated with the Uni- 
versity — directors, administrators, faculty, students 
and alumni — as higher education faces a much 
heralded financial and academic crisis. National 
publications as well as many in the field of educa- 
tion succinctly outline the threatened financial 
crisis that will engulf many educational institutions. 
While this threat is real, its value to Susquehanna 
will be in challenging the resourcefulness of the 
University to remain viable during the years ahead. 

The academic crisis will revolve around the 
role of the small college and its ability to continue 
to provide students with a meaningful educational 
experience. What will justify the existence of Sus- 
quehanna in an era of rapid growth and specializa- 
tion? The University must justify its own existence 
in terms of its commitment to good teaching and 



its respect for and understanding of the traditions 
and beliefs of the Christian faith as they relate to 
the development of the total man. 

In bringing to the campus men and women of 
proven academic skills, the University realizes 
that the goal of a liberal education is that of maxi- 
mizing contact between teacher and student and 
encouraging interaction between the two. The 
immediate problem will be to continue to attract 
and hold good teachers. Priority will be given to 
this objective in the decade ahead. The emphasis 
will be on teaching with expanded opportunity 
for faculty members to participate in research 
activity, but only to the extent that such inde- 
pendent work complements the classroom effort. 

In this regard, Susquehanna has taken signifi- 
cant steps in recent years. Faculty salaries have 
more than doubled to a point where today the 
University ranks among the upper one-third of 
Pennsylvania colleges and universities in compen- 
sation paid to faculty members. Emphasis must 
continue to be placed on improving salaries as 
competition intensifies within the various disci- 
plines. By 1975 the average salary must increase 
from today's $10,000 to almost $15,000. This is 
the price for good teaching, and the University 
stands ready to dedicate itself to this goal. 



Our country prides itself on the fact that 40 
percent of college-age youths attend institutions 
of higher learning. But, as a recent national study 
points out, "only 7 percent of the total college 
enrollment comes from families in the bottom 
quarter of the national scale." In facing the ques- 
tion of optimum size in the decade ahead, the 
Board of Directors and the faculty must remain 
cognizant of Susquehanna's commitment both to 
itself and to society. As a liberal education institu- 
tion, the University can best achieve its educational 
objectives by remaining of such a size where the 
present teacher-student relationship will not be 
impaired. The question then becomes one of 
emphasis. To provide die type of heterogeneity 
that assures a broad cross-section of students from 
various socio-economic backgrounds, more funds 
must be diverted to financial aid. The college 
experience will be enhanced for everyone as a 
more cosmopolitan atmosphere evolves and a 
greater number of disadvantaged students matricu- 
late at Susquehanna. During the period immediate- 
ly ahead, this matter of diversification within the 
student body and the related financial aid factors 
will receive a top priority. 

While students and faculty are the most neces- 
sary ingredients for any college or university, im- 
provements in physical plant must keep pace with 
educational innovation and provide the proper 
equipment for faculty and students. The last ten 
years have seen great strides in this direction as 
Susquehanna's facilities and general physical de- 
velopment have come abreast of most of her sister 
institutions. Achievement is obvious, but the next 
ten years will witness the most ambitious develop- 
ment program in the University's history. The 
purpose now is to provide a unique atmosphere 



attractive to both teacher and student that will 
guarantee success of die educational pursuits of 
the University. To be announced within the next 
several months will be a program geared toward 
satisfying several of the most urgent needs of the 
next decade — expanded library facilities, modern- 
ized dormitory accommodations, a physical edu- 
cation center, and added space for classrooms and 
faculty offices. The commitment in this area of 
physical growth is one which will provide the 
proper facilities needed to support the University's 
academic and cultural programs. 

Having established itself as a college sensitive 
to the needs of modern education, the University 
is aware of the pitfalls of the "status quo." The 
next ten years offer an opportunity to achieve a 
uniqueness that will set the University apart from 
many institutions emphasizing growth and spe- 
cialization. This uniqueness will be achieved by 
design — to retain a favorable teacher-student rela- 
tionship while many colleges and universities ex- 
perience uncontrolled growdi; to emphasize teach- 
ing while many encourage overburdening research, 
often at the expense of the student; and to develop 
further diversification within the student body 
while many private colleges serve only the affluent. 

What has been done at Susquehanna has indeed 
been meaningful; what remains to be done is even 
more significant. The challenge is formidable, and 
the University must rely on all constituents to 
provide leadership and support in achieving these 
goals. The past and its accomplishments are a 
prelude to the future. Susquehanna eagerly an- 
ticipates that future and the challenge it represents, 
realizing that proven leadership and a solid educa- 
tional foundation are a sound basis for optimism. 



CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT 



SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

Seihisgroz'e, Pennsylvania 




1 Selinsgrove Hall 

2 Gustavus Adolphus Hall (destroyed by fire 1 964) 

3 Seibert Hall 

4 Steele Hall 

5 Conservatory of Music (razed 1959) 

6 Hassinger Hall 

7 University Field 

8 Grandstands 

9 Heat Plant 

10 Laundry (razed 1965) 

1 1 University Library 

12 Pine Lawn 

13 Faculty Row 

14 Tennis Courts 

15 Hockey Field 

16 Practice Fields 

17 Baseball 

18 Phi Mu Delta 

19 Lambda Chi Alpha (sold to University 1959) 

20 Theta Chi (sold 1959) 

21 Alumni Gymnasium 

22 413 University Avenue 

23 Bogar Hall 

24 Heilman Music Hall 




CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT ^t /^\ 

SUSQUEHAKfN^ UNIVERSITY ^ (§) 

Seiinsgreve, Pennsylvania 



1 Selinsgrove Hall (renovations 1959, 1961) 

3 Seibert Hall (renovations 1960, 1961) 

4 Steele Hall (renovation 1964) 

6 Hassinger Hall 

7 University Field 

8 Grandstands 

9 Heat Plant (renovation to Maintenance 1963) 

1 1 University Library 

12 Pine Lawn 

13 Faculty Row 

14 Tennis Courts 

15 Hockey Field 

16 Practice Fields 

17 Baseball 

18 Phi Mu Delta (addition 1961) 

19 Lambda Chi Alpha 

20 Theta Chi 

21 Alumni Gymnasium (additions 1962, 1965) 

22 413 University Avenue 

23 Bogar Hall 

24 Heilman Music Hall 

25 Landes Gateway 

26 600 University Avenue 

27 530 University Avenue 

28 300 University Avenue (Health Center) 

29 309 University Avenue (Tau Kappa Epsilon) 

30 1960 Gate 

31 King Gate 

32 528 University Avenue (razed 1961) 




CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT 



%9 

SUSQUEHANNA^ UNIVERSITY =^^ 

Selinsgwtfe, Pennsylvania 




33 

34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 



515-521 University Avenue (razed 1968) 

301 University Avenue (Tau Kappa Epsilon) 

Aikens Hall 

Smith Hall 

Farm Buildings, stables 

Reed Hall 

1963 Gateway 

Power Plant 

514 University Avenue (Casa Espanola) 

Science "all 

400 University Avenue (Beta Rho Epsilon) 
403 University Avenue 
305 University Avenue (La Maison Francaise) 
Men's Residence Hall 
Fisher Estate 
Chapel Auditorium 
402 University Avenue (Beta Rho Epsilon) 

401 University Avenue 
512 University Avenue 
Campus Center 
Conrad Greenhouse 
Soccer 

ntramural Fields 
Library 

Residence Halls 
Physical Education Hall 
Physiol Education Fields 
Academic Hall, including Fine Arts 
Fraternity Houses 




Susquehannans On Parade 



'94 

The Rev. Dr. William M. Rearick, 
the oldest living S.U. alumnus, cele- 
brated his 98th birthday on Christ- 
mas Day. He lives with his son. Dr. 
Robert B. Rearick '21 in Carlisle. Pa. 

'21 

Dr. Mildred E. Winston has offi- 
cially retired after 40 years of service 
in Lutheran Church higher education 
staff work. During her tenure, she 
fulfilled several different assignments 
in the old ULCA and, after merger, 
the LCA. Most recently, she directed 
the LCA Education Fund. Recogniz- 
ed many times for her devotion to 
the needs of youth, she has been 
awarded two honorary degrees. 

'23 

Chaplain Lewis F. and Edna Goff 
Foltz are living in a new mobile 
home at Gasparilla Mobile Estates, 
Box 185. Placida. Fla. 33946. They 
retired last year — he as chaplain of 
the VA Hospital in Philadelphia and 
she as organist in the same hospital 
— and now are enthusiastic fishermen 
on their 16-foot whaler boat. They 
extend a cordial invitation for visits 
from Susquehannans who live or pass 
through the area. 

Chaplain Russell P. Knoebel, re- 
tired lieutenant colonel in the U.S. 
Air Force, is recuperating from a 
heart attack. He and Mrs. Knoebel 
are hoping to visit son Russell Jr.. 
an Air Force pilot who has completed 
many active missions, was once 
downed behind Vietcong lines, and 
is now in Honolulu as inspector of 
all Pacific U.S. Air Force installa- 
tions. Chaplain Knoebel himself log- 
ged many thousands of air miles as 
"Prince of Peace" for the Army. 
Navy, Air Force and Marines. 

'24 

The Rev. W. John Derr retired as 
pastor of Holy Trinity Lutheran 
Church. Jamaica. N.Y., after serving 
since 1928. Recer.tiv he was named 



"Lion of the Year" by the Queens 
Village Lions Club and also elected 
vice president of the Eastern Queens 
YMCA. 

'25 

Dr. Roger M. Blough retired as 
chairman of the Board of United 
States Steel on January 31. He has 
rejoined the law firm of White and 
Case in New York City. 

Dr. Freeman Wilhour retired on 
January 29 after 40 years as a dentist 
in Sunbury. He and his wife expect 
to spend most of their time at their 
home in Cape Coral. Fla., and to do 
a great deal of traveling. 

'26 

Dorothy W . R e e d e r is now the 
librarian at Towson State College 
and is living at 235 Burke Ave.. Balti- 
more, Md. 21204. 

'27 

The Rev. Bert E. Wynn retired as 
pastor of his Rebersburg Church last 
October 15. He and his wife are 
living in Boiling Springs, Pa. 

'31 

Reno S. Knonse, professor of dis- 
tributive education. School of Educa- 
tion, State University of New York 
at Albany, was honored as the na- 
tion's outstanding teacher-educator in 
the field of di'tribution and market- 
ing. He was the first recipient of the 
academy award presented by the 
Council for Distributive Teacher Edu- 
cation in Dallas. Tex. 

'33 

Selon F. Dockey, principal of Ox- 
ford (Pa.) H.S.. was presented the 
Honorary Keystone Farmer degree at 
the annual convention of the Future 
Farmers of America. 



'35 



Dr. Erie /. Shobert has been elected 
a Fellow of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science and 
a member of the Council. He also 
has been elected vice president of 



Stackpole Carbon Company, St. 
Marys. Pa. 

The Rev. Dr. John G. Gensel was 
the subject of an article by John S. 
Wilson in a recent New York Times 
article describing his work with jazz 
musicians. 

Dr. John A. Leant, Pittsburgh 
physician, is pathologist at St. Clair 
Memorial Hospital Division of Labs 
and Department of Nuclear Medicine. 
He is married to the former Eleanor 
Croft '39 and their daughter Susan 
is a senior at Mary Baldwin College 
after spending her junior >ear in 
Spain. 

'44 

The Rev. Dr. William A. Janson 
Jr. is the first president of the new 
Southeastern Pennsylvania Synod, 
Lutheran Church in America. He and 
his wife, the former Margaret Gem- 
mill, and family reside in Lansdale. 
Pa. 

x'45 

Sister Edna McVieker is doing 
specialized work in the field of 
Christian education at St. Peter's 
Lutheran Church, Janesville. Wis. 

'47 

W. David Gross has been appoint- 
ed vice president of the Snyder 
County Trust Co. in Selinsgrove. He 
has served as treasurer of the bank 
since 1953. 

'48 

Paul B. Stetler was named vice 
president of the Swineford National 
Bank, Middleburg, Pa. He was for- 
merly cashier and treasurer of the 
bank. 

x'48 

Eugene B. Steininger was appointed 
manager of market research and 
planning of Chevrolet Motor Divi- 
sion. The appointment is part of an 
expansion of Chevrolet's sales and 
con: timer research activities. He lives 



WINTER 1969 



33 



at the Lafayette Towers West, Detroit. 

Mich. 

'49 

lrina Strawbridge Hallenbeck and 
her husband are now stationed in 
Germany. He is the commander of 
the 440th Signal Battalion. Their 
address: Hq. 440th Signal Battalion, 
APO New York 09227. 

El wood M. McAllister accepted a 
position as deputy regional scout ex- 
ecutive of Region 3. Boy Scouts of 
America. The area covers Pennsyl- 
vania. Virginia, Maryland, and Wash- 
ington, D.C. He assumed his new 
duties last September and is living in 
the Philadelphia area. 

'50 

Dr. Harry M. Bobonich is chair- 
man of the Chemistry Department, 
Shippensburg State College, and serv- 
ing as secretary of the Southeastern 
Pennsylvania section of the American 
Chemical Society. 

'52 

Russell C. Bartle of 1449 Paulton 
St., Johnstown, Pa., former assistant 
comptroller, has been named comp- 
troller of Pennsylvania Electric 
Company. 

Pok Wo Lam's new address is Vent- 
ris Court, Flat A17, 15 Ventris Road, 
Happy Valley, Hong Kong. She 
previously lived in Saigon, Vietnam. 

John H. Momrow Jr. is personnel 
director for the Beech-Nut Corpora- 
tion in the firm's New York City of- 
fice. 

'53 

Harmon L. Andrews is now co- 
ordinator of commercial develop- 
ment for the Consumer and Indus- 
trial Products Division of Uniroyal. 
He. his wife and family live at 
Blueberry Lane, RFD 2, Southbury, 
Conn. 06488. 

Joan Sechrist Thompson is tutoring 
in the rehabilitation ward at Strong 
Memorial Hospital, Rochester, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have two 
daughters. 

'54 

Dr. George B. Backer, practicing 
physician, is director of rheumato- 
logy. Wilkes-Barre General Hospital 
and .Allied Services Rehabilitation, 
Scranton. He is an Associate at the 
Arthritis Clinic. University of Penn- 



sylvania. Dr. Backer was given re- 
search grants from the Arthritis 
Foundation for immunofluorescent 
study of DNA in synovial fluid, and 
Merck Sharp & Dohme for clinical 
evaluation of indomethacien in oste- 
oarthritis. He received a distinguish- 
ed service award from the Arthritis 
Foundation. He is married to the 
former Claire Haggerty and they are 
the parents of two children. 

Walter R. Henry is now industrial 
relations director of the Manufactur- 
ers Association of York, Pa. He was 
formerly associated with Allis-Chal- 
mers Manufacturing Co.. York. 

Stanley S. Manning was transferred 
to Los Angeles as manager of the 
Boiler and Machinery Department, 
Kemper Insurance Co. Stan is mar- 
ried to the former Patricia Hess and 
they are parents of four children. 
After frequent recent moves, they 
now hope to settle down. Address: 
6440 E. Maplegrove St., Oak Park, 
Agoura, Calif. 91301. 

'55 

Barbara Frank Page is a volunteer 
worker with patients at Metropolitan 
State Hospital, Waltham. Mass. She 
is also serving as president of the 
women's circle at her church. Mr. 
and Mrs. Page are the parents of 
three children. 

Carl R. Winey is serving as chair- 
man of the science department at 
Middleburg (Pa.) H.S. and spent the 
past two summers working on water 
pollution control with the Pennsyl- 
vania Department of Health. 

'56 

Helene A. Nestler is teaching third 
grade in the Upper Perkiomen Ele- 
mentary School, Green Lane, Pa. 

Dr. Donald M. Reamer was certifi- 
ed by the American Board of Radi- 
ology in 1968 and is radiologist at 
Oil City and Titusville (Pa.) Hospitals. 
He and his wife have two daughters. 

Dr. Glen E. Smith serves as phy- 
sician and deputy chief in the Depart- 
ment of Medicine, U.S. Public Health 
Service Hospital. Galveston. He also 
is clinical instructor at the University 
of Texas Medical Branch. Dr. Smith 
and his wife have two daughters. 

Gerald E. Wilson is with the 
marketing division of the Pennsyl- 
vania Power and Light Co., Emmaus, 
Pa. 



'57 

The Rev. David H. Harris, former- 
ly of Trinity Lutheran Church, Al- 
toona. Pa., has accepted a call as 
pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church, 
Hughesville, Pa. 

Clay L. Lotah, Santa Monica, 
Calif., is manager of dispenser prod- 
ucts of United States Borax and 
Chemical Co. 

Dr. David C. Wise, at Wyeth Lab- 
oratories. Inc., Philadelphia, is con- 
cerned with the chemistry and psy- 
chology of those systems in the brain 
which regulate reward, positive rein- 
forcement and punishment. He is the 
author of several recent articles in 
science publications. 

'58 

Dr. Mary Lou Ernst, fellow in bi- 
ochemistry. Harvard University, re- 
turned to Susquehanna for a Chem- 
istry Seminar in January. The title 
of her lecture was "Cleavage of 
Horse Immunoglobulin by Cyanogen 
Bromide," which is in press for the 
journal Immunochemistry. 

'59 

Nicholas Kloap is a senior chem- 
ical engineer for Alcoa in Arkansas. 
He and his wife, the former lanet 
Horton Brown, have a daughter Kath- 
leen and live at 716 Saline Circle, 
Benton, Ark. 72015. 

hon'59 

Dr. Albert A. Zimmer and his fam- 
ily are living in Greenville, Pa., 
where he is teaching and serving as 
chairman of the Education Depart- 
ment at Thiel College. 

'60 

Dr. Nancy Phillips Bealor is chief 
resident in obstetrics and gynecology 
at Cooper Hospital, Camden, N.I. 
She plans to set up a private obste- 
trics and gynecology practice soon. 
Husband Barry B. Bealor is head of 
the mathematics department at Audu- 
bon (N.J.) H.S. and they are parents 
of Mark John. 3. 

'61 

The Rev. Elmer H. Eiche is now 
pastor of the Line Mountain Parish 
which includes St. James Church, 
Pitman, and St. John's Church, Leek 
Kill. Pa. He and his family are re- 
siding in the parsonage at leek Kill. 



34 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




These alumni of Susquehanna's Symphony Orchestra returned to campus to 
take part in the University Christinas Concert on December 15: Sandra 
Crowl '67, Jean Price '65, Paulette Zupko '67. Marion Shatto '67. Con- 
ducted by David Boltz '58 of the music faculty, the concert combined 
the talents of a Festival Chorus with the Orchestra — 180 musicians in all. 



'62 

Lynn Manning Mai akin served as 
coordinator for a District Play Fes- 
tival of the Pennsylvania High School 
Speech League held on the S.U. cam- 
pus in January. Eight schools par- 
ticipated in the festival. Lynn is 
teaching speech and drama at Susque- 
hanna Township Sr. H.S.. Harrisburc. 

Capt. Lynn E. Snyder, in the service 
since graduation from Susquehanna, 
has returned to the States after serv- 
ing with a law enforcement unit at 
Nha Trang. Vietnam. He is now in 
security work at Hamilton Air Force 
Base, Calif. 

'63 

Russell I. Fisher has been appoint- 
ed manager of corporate accounting 
for Gulf Oil Corp.. Pittsburgh, where 
he and his wife and three sons are 
living. 

Rudolph J. Ian der Hiel, Esq. was 
recently elected president of the Tio- 
ga County (Pa.) Bar Association for 
1969. He is a partner in the law firm 
of Farr and Van der Hiel in Mans- 
field. Pa. He and his wife live in 
Marsh Creek, Pa. 

Capt. John H. E. Krohn returned 
to the States from 13 months of duty 
in Vietnam and is now stationed at 
Fort Benjamin Harrison. Indianapolis. 
The Kxohns have a son Eric. 8. and 



a daughter Kathy Lou through adop- 
tion, who was a year old last August. 

Charles H. Leathery is a section 
head in the wood finishing laboratory 
of Glidden Paint Co.. Reading, Pa. 

Ann Ferrence Metz is a research 
assistant in the Environmental Health 
Department at the University of 
Cincinnati. Her husband, William 
.x'65. is systems analyst with Proctor 
and Gamble. Cincinnati. 

Dr. Anthony M. Padula is studying 
advanced surgery at Jefferson Medi- 
cal College and also is in the Perry 
Plan of the U.S. Air Force. 

Donald A. Whitko is with Nation- 
wide Insurance Co.. Schwenksville, 
Pa., and taking courses in the Insur- 
ance Institute of America. He also 
is serving as a borough councilman 
and editor of the local Rotary Chap- 
ter. 

hc'63 

Dr. Scott C. Rea of Sunbury was 
honored in December at a testimonial 
dinner for his major contributions 
and service to freemasonry in the 
Sunbury Masonic Temple. He will 
observe his 52nd anniversary as a 
Mason this year. 

x'63 

Judith Nelson earned the M.Ed, 
deeree in counseling and guidance 



from North Texas State University, 
Denton, last May. She is an assistant 
professor at the State University Ag- 
ricultural and Technical College, 
Delhi. N.Y., where she taught for 
three years prior to taking a year's 
leave to work at North Texas State. 

'64 

Capt. Joseph O'Hara III has com- 
pleted his 1 00th combat mission in 
Southeast Asia as a Strategic Air 
Command B-52 Stratofortress naviga- 
tor flying with the 4258th Strategic 
Wing from U - Tapao Airfield in 
Thailand. 

x'64 

Wendel A. Stuck, formerly assis- 
tant manager of the Rea and Derick 
drug store in Milton. Pa., was re- 
cently appointed manager of the 
firm's store in Mechanicsburg. Pa. 

'65 

Carl L. Campbell has been named 
branch manager of the Selinsgrove 
office of Tri-County National Bank. 
He was formerly assistant cashier. 

George W. Fishel Jr. is treasurer 
of York (Pa.) Lincoln-Mercury Co. 
and works in the automotive sales and 
service department. 

Alan Krichev is studying for his 
Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the 
University of Windsor in Ontario. He 
is also doing clinical internship at 
the Wayne County General Hospital 
in suburban Detroit, Mich. He lives 
at Apt. 107, 819 Westminister. Wind- 
sor 16, Ontario. 

Barry L. Lauver, teacher at Sev- 
erna Park H.S., Anne Arundel Coun- 
ty, Md., worked as a research as- 
sistant for Dr. Samuel Massie at the 
U.S. Naval Academy. Annapolis, on 
phenazine derivatives as possible anti- 
malarials to be tested at Walter 
Reed Army Hospital. 

Robert W . Lytle received the M.S. 
degree from Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity with a major in numerical science. 
He is a mathematician under a grad- 
uate-study program at Johns Hopkins 
University Applied Physics Labora- 
tory and in May of this year will 
have completed a three-year intern 
program with his present employer, 
the U.S. Government Department of 
Defense, located at Fort Meade. Md. 
The program consisted of academic 
study along with on-the-job training 
leading to professionalization in his 



WINTER 1969 



35 



career field. Bob and his wife are 
the parents of a daughter, Pamela 
Ann, 2. 

SP5 G. Wayne Miller recently com- 
pleted a report to The Selinsgrove 
Times - Tribune of a tour through 
Europe locating his ancestors. 

William G. Straus, who earned the 
M.A. in chemistry teaching at Fair- 
leigh Dickinson University in 1966, 
is with the U.S. Army security agency. 
He now attends electronics school, 
U.S. Army Signal Corps, Fort Mon- 
mouth, N.J. 

'66 

Douglas R. Buffington has been 
promoted to department head in the 
accounting department in the Quaker- 
town plant of Moore Business Forms. 
Inc. He is living at 449 Mill Road, 
Quakertown, Pa. 18951. 

1/Lt Wayne H. Fisher FU 3181655, 
GEEIA Liaison Officer, % 1883 C.S., 
APO San Francisco, Calif. 96326. 
Wayne was sent to Vietnam for Air 
Force duty in July. 

Ens. Robert W. Goddard completed 
his master's degree in political science 
at the University of Vermont last 
summer, joined the Navy and receiv- 
ed his commission in October. He is 
now in flight training, at Pensacola, 
Fla. 

Walter L. Siegel is now studying 
at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 
He recently was with the Peace Corps 
and was in Thailand working in the 
National Malaria Eradication Pro- 
gram. His address is 616 N. High- 
land Ave.. Pittsburgh, Pa. 15206. 

John C. Troutman is teaching vocal 
music in the Osceola Elementary 
School, Vero Beach, Fla. His address 
is Box 84. Wabasso, Fla. 32970. 

x'66 

Edgar W. Clark, after serving a 
tour of duty in the Vietnam area, 
arrived at Norfolk, Va., in December. 
He has been promoted to third class 
petty oficer and serves on the USS 
America, an aircraft carrier. 

2/Lt Thomas E. Peachey 0107501, 
H & S Co., 81 Platoon, 3rd Bn., 9th 
Marines. 3rd Marine Div., FPO San 
Fancisco, Calif. 96602. He left for 
Vietnam in December and is serving 
about 15 miles south of the demili- 
tarized zone. 



'67 

Anthony J. Costello, a graduate 
assistant at Northern Illinois Univers- 
ity. DeKalb, is teaching in quant labs 
and pursuing an advanced degree in 
biochemistry. His wife, the former 
Karen Rowe, is a medical technician 
at a Rockford (111.) hospital. 

Lt.(jg) Harry A. Deith is serving as 
supply officer on the USS Lafayette 
(SSBN616), a nuclear powered polaris 
submarine. His wife is the former 
Lynn Ortiz '68. 

Joanne Hiatt Fowler was elected 
Miss Wyeth Torch for 1969. Joanne 
is a secretary in the sales department 
of Wyeth Laboratories, Inc.. Radnor. 
Pa. Her husband, Robert '67 is con- 
struction manager for the Brookhaven 
Development Corp. They live in West 
Chester, Pa. 

Charles A. Holmes is in charge of 
quality control at the Metal Wire 
Recovery Corp., Danville, Pa. 

Carolyn Wahler Miller, formerly 
a systems engineer trainee with IBM 
Corp., is now teaching junior high 
math in the Upper Dublin (Ft. Wash- 
ington, Pa.) school system. Husband 
Robert teaches secondary music in the 
same system. 



"I DO" 



HUNT-FELICIANO 
Terri Feliciano Haas '58 to George 
Hunt, May 25. 1968. The couple and 
Richard, 6!», born to Terri and the 
late Merle Haas, are residing at 
2623-A, NAKAKU Place, Honolulu. 
Oahu, Hawaii 96814. 

HILL - SW ANSON 
Susan Lynne Swanson '67 to Ron- 
ald James Hill '68, June 1968. Susan 
is a caseworker for the Bergen Coun- 
ty Welfare Board. Hackensack, N.J. 
The couple is living at 259 Passaic 
St.. Hackensack, N.J. 07601. 

PENCE -SARBACHER 
Susan F. Sarbacher x'68 to Robert 
F. Pence. They live at 7513 Maple 
Ave., Takoma Park, Md. 20012. 

RUSSELL- HACKETT 
Joan Lee Hackett '68 to T. Hans 
Russell, June 15, 1968. An alumnus 



of Bucknell University, Mr. Russell 
is office manager for the New Jersey 
Bell Telephone Co.. Irvington, N.J. 

REECE - BUCKS 
Bonnie Marie Bucks '65 to James 
Stephen Reece, June 1968. Bonnie 
was awarded the M.B.A. by Harvard 
Graduate School of Business Admin- 
istration. Her husband, a graduate 
of Yale University, is a candidate 
for a doctoral degree at the Harvard 
Business School. The couple resides 
at 24 Peabody Terrace, Apt. 1801. 
Cambridge, Mass. 02138. 

ROBERTS - MITCHELL 
Donna Mitchell to Thomas G. P. 
Roberts '68, July 27, 1968, Mount St. 
Peters Roman Catholic Church, New 
Kensington, Pa. Address of the 
couple is 1725 Woodmont Ave., 
Arnold, Pa. 15068. 

BURKHOLDER - AKE 
Donna Jean Ake '67 to J. Dean 
Burkholder. August 17, 1968, St. 
Paul's Lutheran Church, Lititz, Pa. 
Organist was Joanne Reitz '69 and 
assisting with the wedding was Susan 
Welty Ferrari '67. Donna is organist 
at St. Paul's and in her second year 
of teaching elementary music in the 
Lower Dauphin School District, 
Hummelstown, Pa. Mr. Burkholder 
is presently faculty - student council 
president and senior mathematics 
major at Lebanon Valley College. 

GRIMES -RUOCCO 

Carolyn Ann Ruocco '67 to Willard 
M. Grimes HI '68, August 17, 1968, 
Saint Luke's Episcopal Church, Mont- 
clair, N. J. Dianne Gooderham '67 
was maid of honor and Evelyn War 
'68 was musical coordinator. Carolyn 
was assistant to a management con- 
sultant in Colorado and plans to do 
substitute teaching near her home, 
428 Valley Road, Upper Montclair, 
N.J. 07043, until Will completes basic 
training with the Army Chemical 
Corps. 

BROWER - LEWIS 
Marion R. Lewis to William R. 
Brower x'68, August 31.1 968, Marple 
Presbyterian Church. Broomall, Pa. 
Russell D. Schantz '68 served as an 
usher. Mrs. Brower. a graduate of 
Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, is working at Delaware 
County Memorial Hospital. The 
couple resides at 85-17 Feme Boule- 
vard. Drexel Hill. Pa. 19026. 



36 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



MIGLIACCIO- KELLY 

Christine N a n c y Kelly '68 to 
Nicholas Joseph Migliaccio '67, No- 
vember 3, 1968. Nick is an invest- 
ment banking and securities sales- 
man for C. C. Collings, Inc., Phila- 
delphia. Their address is 833 Childs 
Ave., Drexel Hill, Pa. 19026. 

RUTH-SMEDLEY 

Judith Smedley '65 to Ronald L. 
Ruth, November 9, 1968, Christ Lu- 
theran Church, Barnesville, Pa. Dr. 
Otto Reimherr hon'67 performed the 
ceremony. Judith is a program ana- 
lyst for the Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion Administration. Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare. 
Washington, D. C. The couple re- 
sides at 1005 Chillum Rd., Apt. 214. 
Hyattsville, Md. 20782. 

UNDERKOFFLER - ZIMMERMAN 
Bonnie Zimmerman to Owen W. 
Underkoffler '54. November 9, 1968 
Zion Lutheran Church, Sunbury, Pa. 
The Rev. Gilbert C. Askew '61 per- 
formed the marriage ceremony. Owen 
is part-owner of the Sunbury Monu- 
mental Works, established by his late 
father, J. Willis Underkoffler. Ad- 
dress of the couple is 118)2 South 
Tenth St., Sunbury, Pa. 17801. 

WEIDNER - SHIELDS 

Margaret Agnes Shields '67 to 
Gary R. Weidner, November 16, 1968, 
United Methodist Church, Somer- 
ville, N.J. The groom is attending 
•chool and Meg is an elementary 
vocal music teacher. Boyertown 
(Pa.) Area Schools. The couple re- 
sides at 113 S. Keswick Ave.. Glen- 
side. Pa. 19038. 

KELLY - WALTHER 

C. Donnell Walther to Frederick 
W. Kelly Jr. '66. November 23. 1968. 
Otterbein United Methodist Church. 
Sunbury, Pa. Mrs. Kelly was gradu- 
ated cum laude from Bloomsburg 
State College in January and is teach- 
ing first grade at Jackson-Penn Ele- 
mentary School, Selinsgrove. Fred 
is with the Snyder County Trust Co., 
Selinsgrove. The couple resides at 
515)s North High St.. Selinsgrove, Pa. 
17870. 

SELINGER - KLOSE 

Betsy Anne Klose '68 to Kenneth 
Roger Selinger '68, November 23. 
1968. Address of the couple is Mont- 
gomery Courts Apts. J-21. Narberth. 
Pa. 19072. 



TAYLOR - PLATT 
Cynthia Lyn Plait '68 to Byron M. 
Taylor, November 23, 1968. Mr. 
Taylor is with General Electric Cor- 
poration in Trenton. The couple lives 
at Apt. 5-D, Hillcrest Apts., Trenton, 
N.J. 08620. 

JACOBS- FINN 
Jane Finn to Robert H. Jacobs x'71 , 
December 7. 1968. Church of An- 
nunciation, Havertown, Pa. Address: 
5 1 9 Wynne Ave., Havertown. Pa. 
19083. 

MEYER -KLEE 

Kathryn Lisabeth K I e e x'7Q to 
John A. Meyer '68. December 21, 

1968. Kathy is employed by The 
Chase Manhattan Bank, New York 
City. The couple resides at 176-B 
Main St., Little Falls, N.J. 07424. 

ORSO- CARPENTER 
Mary Ann Carpenter '68 to Donald 
Paul Orso '68. December 21, 1968, 
Trinity Congregational Church. 
Scranton. Pa. Don's father. Dr. Paul 
M. Orso '40, performed the wedding 
ceremony. Virginia Carlson '69 serv- 
ed as maid of honor. Signe Gates x'71 
was one of the bridesmaids and 
James Frutchey Jr. x'68 was best 
man. The couple lives at #7 White 
Lodge, Bellevue Ave., Newport, R.I. 
02840. 

COOPER -CLARK 
Deborah L. Clark to Lawrence R. 
Cooper '64, January 1969. Mrs. 
Cooper is attending Bloomsburg State 
College and Larry is senior band 
director at Shamokin Area High 
School. Address of the couple is R. 
D. 2. Overlook, Shamokin. Pa. 17872. 

HILL- WOODRUFF 

P a it I a Jeanne Woodruff x'67 to 
Donald B r o w n Hill x'68. January 

1969, in Lemoyne, Pa. 

DePERRO-HITCHENS 

Barbara Hitchens '69 to Hen r y 
Joseph DePerro '70. January 4, 1969, 
St. Joseph's Church, Niagara Falls. 
N.Y. Both Barbara and Henry are 
students at S.U. and are making their 
home at 4 South Market St., Selins- 
grove, Pa. 17870. 

WILLIAMS- MEHRER 
Patricia Ann Mehrer '68 to Ronald 
Walter Williams '67. Ron is in 
marketing research for the Philadel- 
phia Electric Co. The couple resides 
at 241 Clark, Plymouth Green Apts., 
Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. 



Born Crusaders 



To Paul R. Jr. '53 and June Trexler 
Nestler. a daughter, Christel Joan, 
February 12, 1968. Christel has two 
brothers. Paul III, 7. and Eric Martin. 
4. Mr. Nestler is president of the 
Green Lane (Pa.) Hosiery Company. 
Inc. Address: Walnut St., Green Lane. 
Pa. 18054. 

To Roberta and Roy Howard Cope 
'52, a daughter. Lynne Marie, April 
11, 1968. The Copes now have five 
daughters and a son. In September 
Roy was transferred by Royal-Globe 
Insurance Group from Wilkes-Barre 
to Richmond as a commercial under- 
writing supervisor. 2 5 2 5 Schenley 
Dr., Richmond, Va. 23235. 

To Norman and Linda Kent Heyl 
'63, their second child, a son. Mark 
Frederick. July 30, 1968. Mr. Heyl 
is a supervisory auditor for the U. S. 
Government. Linda has been a teach- 
er-psychologist for retarded children 
and a part-time nursery school teach- 
er. 662 Fairview Ave., Takoma Park, 
Md. 20012. 

To Glenn E. '69 and Beth Runk 
Litdwig '69. a son, Matthew Scott, 
September 26, 1968. Beth has com- 
pleted her student teaching assign- 
ment and is now teaching 10th grade 
English at Juniata Joint H. S. Glenn 
completed his bachelor's degree in 
January and is teaching geography at 
East Juniata Joint H. S., Cocolamus, 
Pa. Next fall he will be enrolled in 
the Lutheran Theological Seminary 
at Gettysburg. 

To Gene and Donna Bair Long 
x'62, a daughter. Dawn Ann, October 
1, 1968. Dawn has a sister, Brenda, 
and twin brothers, Curtis and Doug- 
las. Mr. Long has been named assist- 
ant to the director in addition to his 
previous duties as physical director 
of the Lebanon, Pa. YMCA. South 
14th Ave., Lebanon, Pa. 17042. 

To Robert M. and Maria Werni- 
kowski Macfarlan '62. their first child, 
a daughter, Paige Whitney, October 
14, 1968. Mr. Macfarlan is an as- 
sociate with the Paterson, N.J. law 
firm of Evans, Hand, Allabough and 
Ancoresaxi. He is a graduate of 
Lafajette College and the Cornell 
Law School. 50-B Byrne Court, 
Wa>ne, N.J. 07470. 



WINTER 1969 



37 



Dr. and Mrs. Jeff Safford. their 
third child, a son, Alexander Billings, 
November 15, 1968. Dr. Safford was 
assistant director of public relations 
at Susquehanna in the early '60s and 
is now a member of the history fac- 
ulty of the University of Montana, 
Bozeman. 

To Baird E. '5S and Mary Jane 
Bolze Collins, their second daughter, 
Kathy Ann, November 17, 1968. 
Baird is instrumental music supervisor 
at Green Park Union School District, 
Elliottsburg, Pa. R. D. 1, Loysville, 
Pa. 17047. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Reed, a son. 
Michael Allen, November 19, 1968. 
Mr. Reed is director of data process- 
ing and accounting at Susquehanna. 
R. D. 2. Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Sandy and Vaughn A. Wolfe 
'67, a son, Douglas Eugene, Decem- 
ber 4, 1968. Sandy was formerly 
secretary to Susquehanna's Dean of 
Students and Vaughn is department 
head in industrial therapy at the Sel- 
insgrove State School and Hospital. 
R. D. 1, Port Trevorton, Pa. 17864. 

To Mary and Carl L. Campbell '65, 
a son, Craig Lee. December 17, 1968. 
Craig has a sister, Carla Lyn, 2. 
Carl is branch manager of the Sel- 
insgrove office, Tri-County National 
Bank. 202 W. Chestnut St., Selins- 
grove, Pa. 17870. 

To Gary W. '65 and Shirley Bolig 
Owens, a daughter. Angela Sue, De- 
cember 27. 1968. Gary has accepted 
a call as associate pastor of the 
Buffalo Lutheran Parish, which takes 
effect in mid-June upon completion 
of his work at Gettysburg Seminary. 
The four churches include St. John's, 
Lewisburg R.D. 3; New Columbia 
Lutheran Church; Mazeppa Union 
and Trinity Lutheran of Cowan, Pa. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Barry L. Peiffer. 
a son, Jonathan Lozier, January 7, 
1969. Mr. Peiffer is instructor in 
mathematics at Susquehanna. R.D. 1, 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Manhart, 
twins, a son, Samuel and a daughter 
Lisa, January 13, 1969. Father is a 
son of Dr. George B. Manhart '10 
and nephew of Miss Sarah B. Man- 
hart '13. New Kingston, Pa. 

To Richard P. and Elizabeth Elmer 
Kaufmann '68, a daughter, Kristina 
Marie, January 22, 1969. Mr. Kauf- 
mann is a graduate of Bucknell Uni- 



versity. 90-13 Feme Blvd.. Drexel 
Hill, Pa. 19026. 

To Fred G. '64 and Terri Clifford 
Hershey. a son, Todd Clifford, Jan- 
uary 27, 1969. Fred is with Bell 
Telephone in Rochester, N.Y. 60 Hol- 
lywood Ave., Rochester. N.Y. 14618. 

To Ronald C. '64 and Karen Sei- 
fried Hendrix '65, their first child, 
a daughter. Susan Lynn, February 5, 
1969. Ron is on leave from his work 
as a senior rehabilitation counselor 
for the Sate of Connecticut and is a 



full-time Ph.D. candidate at the Uni- 
versity of Connecticut, with concen- 
tration in rehabilitation and psycholo- 
gical research. He earned a federal 
Vocational Rehabilitation Administra- 
tion scholarship. Until January 1, 
Karen was teaching freshman English 
at Johnson Jr. H.S., Stratford, Conn. 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Nylund. 
their third child, a son, James Carl, 
February 9, 1969. Dr. Nylund is 
assistant professor of chemistry at 
S.U. 604 North Tenth St., Selins- 
grove. 



Class of '68 Reports 



continued from page 12 

Frank Calvin Grenoble Jr.: Gradu- 
ate study. Temple University School 
of Dentistry. 

J o h n Robert Griffiths: Teaching 
history and coaching football and 
wrestling at Methacton High School. 
Fairview Village, Pa. Married Verni 
Jones, graduate of East Stroudsburg 
State College. 

Laleah Dawn Grigg: Medical school 
student at Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. 

Willard Mudget Grimes III: First 
semester graduate study at the Uni- 
versity of Colorado with a teaching 
assistantship, and in March entered 
the U.S. Army Chemical Corps. 

Brian A. Gross: Personnel consul- 
tant for Snelling and Snelling, Read- 
ing, Pa. 

Andrew Norton G rover: Teaching 
in a junior high school in Holyoke, 
Mass. Expects to attend Columbia 
University School of Library Science 
in September. 

/ o a n Hackett Russell: English 
teacher, Wayne (N.J.) Valley School. 

Robert Wayne Hadfield: Market- 
ing trainee, building products division, 
Armstrong Cork Co., Lancaster, Pa., 
prior to the fall when he entered the 
U.S. Army Officer Candidate School. 
Fort Meade, Md. 

Richard Stephen Haines: Develop- 
ment specialist, Atlantic Richfield Co., 
Maple Shade, N.J. 

John Stephen Hale: Training pro- 
gram. National Bank and Trust Com- 
pany of Central Pennsylvania, Harris 
burg area. 



Jimmy Harrison Hall: Completed 
service duty and is an administrative 
management trainee with the Harris- 
burg branch office of Equitable Life 
Assurance Society. 

Samuel Joseph Halpern: Graduate 
study, American University-Washing- 
ton College of Law. 

None y Hanior Evans: Teacher, 
Sherburne (Vt.) Co-op Nursery 
School. Also a bartender at Wobbly 
Barn. Killington, Vt. 

Dianne Lee Harshman: Teaching 
9th grade social studies. Southwest 
Butler County School District, Har- 
mony, Pa. 

John Havas: 2/Lt U.S. Marine 
Corps, commissioned at S.U. com- 
mencement exercises. Presently at- 
tending Dickinson School of Law. 

Robert Allen Heinbach Jr.: Work- 
ing toward master's degree in marine 
biology, California State Polytechnic 
College. San Luis Obispo. 

Gwen Ann Henneforth: Assistant 
to the assistant vice president, market- 
ing department. The Fidelity Bank, 
Philadelphia. 

Henry H. Herrington: Staff account- 
ant, Ernst and Ernst, certified public 
accountants, Buffalo, N.Y. 

Ronald James Hill: Graduate work. 
Fairleigh Dickinson School of Den- 
tistry. Teaneck, N.J. Also, Ensign U. 
S. Naval Reserves, Dental Corps. 

Eric Laurens Horn: % Wardroom, 
USS Wright (CC-2), FPO New York, 
N.Y. 09501. Entered U.S. Navy Of- 
ficer Candidate School in August and 
is now an ensign Home port, Nor- 



38 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



folk, Va. and operating along East 
Coast. USS Wright is a communica- 
tions ship. 

Cecil Lay Hornbeck Jr.: Graduate 
study in biochemistry with a scholar- 
ship at Arizona State University. 
Tempe. Served with the U.S. Marine 
Corps 1959-1963. Married the form- 
er Bonnie Emsweiler. 

Denise Horton Jackson: Casework- 
er and interpreter for the Delaware 
County Board of Assistance. Chester. 
Pa. 

James Paul Howard: Pursuing grad- 
uate study in pharmacology. Bowling 
Green (Ohio) State University. 

Mary Anna Ingram: Mathematics 
teacher, Lansdowne-Aldan H.S. and 
working toward master's degree in 
the Intern Teaching Program, Temple 
University. 

Barry Mellaril Jackson: Manage- 
ment trainee. Equitable Life Assur- 
ance Co., Philadelphia. 

Benjamin Leroy Jones: Band di- 
rector. Upper Adams School District, 
Biglerville, Pa. 

Christa J. Jorgensen: Social studies 
teacher. Union County Regional High 
School District. Springfield, N.J. 

Gail E. Kantrowitz: Graduate study 
in Latin with a scholarship at Bryn 
Mawr College. 

Richard A I a n Kellogg: Manage- 
ment trainee, Gregory and Son. 

Margaret Ann Keyser: Was with 
the Department of Public Works 
(Federal Government), Toronto, 
Canada, and in March began courses 
toward certification in secondary li- 
brary science, Shippensburg State 
College. 

Robert James King: Biology teach- 
er. East Juniata H.S.. McAllisterville. 
Pa. 

Hans K. Klar: Teacher, Toms River 
(N.J.) Schools. 

Betsy Klose Selinger: Elementary 
music teacher. Stonehurst Hills Ele- 
mentary Schools. Upper Darby. Pa. 
Also working toward master's degree 
in music performance at Temple Uni- 
versity. 

Charlotte Lenore Knupp: Elemen- 
tary vocal music teacher, Tawonka 
Elementary School, Neshaminy 
School District, Langhorn, Pa. 

Joseph Roy Luuver Jr.: Graduate 
study in philosophy with an assistant- 
ship at Harpur College. 

Benjamin Larzelere 111: Graduate 
study, Lutheran Theological Semin- 
ary at Gettysburg. 



WINTER 1969 



Jeffrey A lie n Leese: Production 
chemist. Allied Chemical Corp.. Mar- 
cus Hook. Pa. 

J o h n Frederick Lehr: Graduate 
study, Lutheran Theological Seminary 
at Gettysburg. 

Barbara Leonard 1 accaro: Secre- 
tary to marketing director. W. A. 
Benjamin, Inc., science publishers in 
New York City. 

William Arthur Lewis Jr.: Com- 
pleted active duty obligation for the 
National Guard. Is now assistant to 
the director of executive development. 
John Wanamaker. Philadelphia. Plans 
to attend law school next fall. 

Wayne C. Liddick: American lit- 
erature teacher and assistant foot- 
ball and wrestling coach, J. F. Ken- 
nedy H.S.. Willingboro, N.J. 

Kathleen Edith Livingston: Market- 
Research, Procter & Gamble. Cincin- 
nati. 

Richard Joseph I.ohosco: Opera- 
tions liaison trainee, Bache and Co.. 
New York City. Married. 

Nicholas Anthony Lopardo: Ad- 
ministrative trainee. The Equitable 
Life Assurance Society of America, 
Harrisburg. Member of the U.S. 
Army Reserves. 

J a m e s Louis Lubrecht 11: U.S. 
Army Signal Corps, stationed at Fort 
Gordon, Ga. until April. 

Jerome E v e I e r Lynch: Science 
teacher, Montgomery Hills Jr. H.S.. 
Montgomery County, Md. 

Maxine Manning: Assistant to man- 
ager. Advertising Department. Cer- 
tain - Teed Saint Gobian Insulation 
Corp., Bala Cynwyd, Pa. 

Leonard J. Marzano: Methods ac- 
countant. Pennsylvania Power A; 
Light Co.. Allentown. 

Constance L. Mason: Personnel 
counselor for Snelling and Snelling, 
Atlantic City, N.J. 

Richard Spencer McAllister: Man- 
agement training. Equitable Life As- 
surance Co.. Syracuse. N.Y. 

Donald A. McBane: Associate Dis- 
trict Scout Executive, Greater Niagara 
Frontier Council, Boy Scouts of 
America, Buffalo. N.Y. 

Charles Hamilton McLeskey: Med- 
ical student, Bowman Gray School 
of Medicine. 

Elizabeth Ann McNulty: Casework- 
er, Lycoming County Child Welfare 
Services. Williamsport. Pa. 

Patricia Mehrer Williams: Employ- 
ment counselor at Youth Opportun- 
ity Center. Bureau of Employment 



39 



Security. North Philadelphia. 

John Athony Meyer: History teach- 
er. Clifton (N.J.) H.S.. currently serv- 
ing with the U.S. Army at Fort Dix. 

Richard Frederick Michael: Gradu- 
ate study. Lutheran Theological Sem- 
inary at Gettysburg. 

Catherine Michener Tunis: Attend- 
ing the Graduate School of Library 
Science. Drexel Institute of Technol- 
ogy, under a Federal fellowship. 

Thomas Russell Milbrand: Band 
director. East Juniata H.S.. Cocola- 
mus. Pa. 

Trudy Miller Miner: Teaching 5th 
and 6lh grades. West Snyder Schools. 
Beaver Springs. Pa. 

Gerald J. Miskar: History teacher 
and football coach. Woodbury (N.J.) 
High School. 

John Charles Morrill II: Graduate 
study, the Lutheran Theological Sem- 
inary at Philadelphia. 

Stephen R. Nace: Terminal Man- 
agement. Consolidated Freightways, 
York, Pa. 

James Basil Nayduch: U.S. Army 
Officer Candidate School, Fort Sill. 
Okla. 



Susquehanna University 

1969 
Spring Sports Schedules 







BASEBALL 




A 


11 


Wagner 


H 


A 


12 


Hartwick (2) 


H 


A 


14 


Juniata 


H 


A 


IS 


Philadelphia Textile 


A 


A 


19 


Delaware Valley (2) 


A 


A 


22 


Albright 


H 


A 


24 


Lycoming 


A 


A 


2f, 


Messiah (2) 


H 


A 


29 


Bucknell 


A 


M 


1 


Elizabethtown 


H 


M 


3 


Dickinson (2) 


H 


M 


5 


King's 


A 


\l 


8 


Juniata 


A 


\l 


10 


Upsala (2) 


H 


\l 


12 


Scranton (2) 


A 


M 


13 


Wilkes 


H 



GOLF 

,"• 15 Scranton A 

A IS Upsala H 

A 21 Wilkes A 

A 24 L> coming and Juniata A 

A 25 Delaware Valley 

and Bloomsburg H 

A 28 Franklin & Marshall A 

M 5 MAC Tournament A 

M 8 Bucknell A 

M 9 Elizabethtown H 

M 12 Gettysburg H 

M 15 King's A 



Challis Arlene Niles: Caseworker. 
New York City Department of Social 
Services. Bureau of Public Assistance. 

Jeffrey Lynn Noble: Completed 
active duty with the Air National 
Guard and is now teaching instru- 
mental music in the South Middleton 
School District. Boiling Springs. Pa. 

Nancy Lee Oliver: Social Worker 
I. Cuyahoga County Welfare Depart- 
ment, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Donald Paul Orso: Commissioned 
an ensign in the U.S. Navy and as- 
signed to Newport. R.I., in Naval 
Communications. 

L y n n Ortiz Deith: Caseworker, 
Charleston County Department of 
Public Welfare. Charleston, S.C. 

John C. Paterson Jr. SN B409943, 
USS Meeker County (LST 980), FPO 
San Francisco, Calif. 96601. Serving 
in the Navy since September. 

Michael Perot: Comptroller of cur- 
rency. Third National Bank Region, 
assistant in trusts, Philadelphia. 

Frederick Louis Phelps III: Ac- 
countant. Haskins and Sells, certified 
public accountants. Philadelphia. 







TENNIS 




A 


HI 


Hartwick 


A 


A 


12 


Albright 


H 


A 


17 


Bloomsburg 


A 


A 


21 


Bucknell 


H 


A 


25 


Wilkes 


A 


A 


26 


King's 


A 



A 2X Elizabethtown H 

M 1 Scranton H 

M 3 Lycoming H 

M 5 Dickinson A 

M 7 Delaware Valley H 

M 9-10 MAC Tournament A 

M 15 Juniata A 

TRACK 

\ 9 Delaware Valley A 

A 12 Hartwick A 

A 1 5 Ursinus and 

Franklin & Marshall A 

A 19 Wagner H 

A 22 Dickinson and Juniata H 

A 26 Western Maryland H 

A 2S Gettysburg A 

M 3 Lycoming and Bucknell H 

M A Upsala and Kutztown A 

M 9-10 MAC Championships A 







WOMEN'S TENNIS 




A 


TT 


Bucknell 


A 


A 


24 


Elizabethtown 


H 


A 


29 


Shippensburg 


A 


M 


1 


Millersville 


A 


\l 


6 


Penn State 


H 


M 


s 


Lock Haven 


H 



Gregory Douglas Phillips: Case- 
worker, Delaware County Depart- 
ment of Social Services. Delhi, N.Y. 

Marilyn Jean Pierce: Accounting 
department. Price Waterhouse & Co.. 
New York City. 

Mary Elizabeth Pierce: Elementary 
vocal music teacher, Northampton 
(Pa.) Area School District. 

Cynthia Piatt Taylor: 7th grade 
English teacher. Northern Burlington 
City Regional H.S., Columbus, N.J. 

Richard G. Poinsett: 2/Lt, U. S. 
Marine Corps, commissioned at S.U. 
commencement. Attending William 
and Mary School of Law. 

Pamela J. R. Radtke: Science teach- 
er. Upper Moreland H.S.. Willow 
Grove, Pa. Also doing graduate work 
in education at Temple University 
under a National Science Foundation 
grant. 

7 a m e s Robert Reaser: Teaching 
junior high vocal music. Kingston 
(N.Y.) City Schools, Consolidated. 

Mary Elizabeth Reichner: Recrea- 
tion therapist. Northwestern Mental 
Health Center, Philadelphia. 

Richard Marl i n Rex: Graduate 
study. Pennsylvania College of Op- 
tometry. Philadelphia. 

Nancy Anne Rickenbaugh: Acting 
director. Juniata County Child Wel- 
fare. Mifflintown, Pa. 

Sail y Brown Ridgley: Graduate 
study and psychological research as- 
sistant at Princeton University. 

Deborah Elizabeth Ritter: Graduate 
study. University of Pennsylvania 
School of Arts and Sciences, working 
toward M.S. in biology. 

Christopher Starkey Robbins: Man- 
agement trainee. Roadway Express. 
Inc. Allentown, Pa. 

H. Larry Roberts: Music teacher. 
Woodbury (N.J.) H.S. 

Thomas Gerald Paul Roberts: Aud- 
itor, Main LaFrentz and Co., Pitts- 
burgh. 

Edith Ellen Rogers: Employment 
Services Interviewer, New Jersey 
State Department of Labor and In- 
dustry. Trenton. 

Joanne Lillian Romano: Teaching 
7th and 8th grade Spanish. Pomona 
(N.Y.) Jr. H.S. 

Charles John Romberger: Assistant 
project engineer. Homer Research 
Laboratories. Bethlehem Steel Corp.. 
Bethlehem. Pa. 

Robert Lewis Russell: 3rd Platoon 
54th Co., 5th Student Bn.. The Can- 
didate Brigade. Fort Benning, Ga. 



40 



31905. U.S. Army Infantry Officer 
Candidate School. 

David Mathers Sandham: Employ- 
ed by Sears. Roebuck. Inc., Lancas- 
ter. Pa. 

Frank Joseph Sawicki: U.S. Army, 
Fort Polk, La. 

Jean Sawyer Mei.xsell: Has been 
living in Germany and will return 
to the U.S. in June. 

Laura Emily Scaife: Elementary 
teacher. Williamsport (Pa.) School 
District. Pursuing graduate study at 
Bread Loaf School of English. 

Russell Donald Schantz Jr.: Ad- 
ministrative trainee, Equitable Insur- 
ance Co.. Buffalo, N.Y. 

Janet Schmaltz Ross: Housewife 
and mother of a baby son. 

Richard L. Schuster: Graduate 
study. Dickinson School of Law. 

Ruth Seigfried Himelberger: Math- 
ematics teacher. Berks County Voca- 
tional Technical Center West, Lees- 
port, Pa. 

Kenneth Roger Selinger: Intern 
teaching program. Temple University, 
Philadelphia, working toward master's 
in education. 

Donald Paul Shadle: Caseworker, 
Allegheny County Board of Assist- 
ance, Pittsburgh's Hill District. 

Bruce Robert Shallcross: Auditor, 
Haskins & Sells, Philadelphia. 

Johanna Lynn Sheese: Advanced 
study. Graduate School of Social 
Work, University of Pittsburgh. 

Carol L. Slezak: Teaching English, 
Saltsburg (Pa.) Jr. H.S. 

Barbara Smith Norton: Librarian, 
Rockcreek Palisades Elementary 
School, Montgomery County, Md. 

Evelyn Charlotte Smith: Statisti- 
cian, Aetna Insurance Co.. Hartford, 
Conn. 

Edward L e w i s Sol em: Summer 
study in physics at Case Western Re- 
serve University. Now pursuing grad- 
uate study at Williams College. 

Jeffery Penrose Spencer: Under- 
writing. Allstate Insurance Co., Valley 
Forge, Pa. 

Richard Donald Spolts: Auditing 
Department, Peat, Marwick and Mit- 
chell, certified public accountants. 
Philadelphia. 

Walter LeRoy Startzel Jr.: Vocal 
music teacher. Northern York County 
H.S.. Dillsburg. Pa. 

Ann Lenore Stauffenberg: Gradu- 
ate work, Columbia University School 
of Library Service. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 





CMSAdER SCOREBORRd 






WINTER 


1968 - 


69 










su 


WRESTLING 


Opp 








19 


Washington 


16 








35 


Eastern Baptist 


8 


su 


BASKETBALL 


Opp 


24 


American 


9 


101 


Lycoming 


104 


8 


Juniata 


24 


S 1 


Lehigh 


94 


13 


Bucknell 


20 


77 


Scranton 


85 


8 


Delaware Valley 


24 


86 


Wagner 


94 


20 


Lebanon Valley 


14 


57 


Juniata 


86 


34 


Philadelphia Bible 


3 


102 


Towson State 


104 


23 


Wagner 


8 


85 


Mansfield State 


103 


13 


Dickinson 


19 


68 


Albright 


70 




Won 6 Lost 4 




66 


Philadelphia Textile 


104 








85 


Delaware Valley 


106 




JV BASKETBALL 




72 


Ithaca 


83 


81 


Lycoming 


88 


84 


Wagner 


90 


84 


Scranton 


88 


76 


American 


87 


67 


Bucknell Frosh 


71 


81 


Albright 


94 


90 


Juniata 


100 


103 


Elizabethtown 


142 


67 


Albright 


71 


90 


Wilkes 


1 13 


83 


Philadelphia Textile 


72 


80 


Juniata 


60 


56 


Delaware Valley 


65 


69 


Scranton 


83 


87 


Williamsport Com. 


104 


75 


Lebanon Valley 


74 


76 


Albright 


85 


76 


Upsala 


63 


74 


Elizabethtown 


98 


103 


Wilkes 


79 


75 


Wilkes 


80 


84 


Rider 


88 


89 


Juniata 


72 




Won 4 Lost 1 8 




1 14 


Scranton 


102 








77 


Lebanon Valley 


92 








71 


Luzerne County C.C. 


70 








96 


Wilkes 
Won 5 Lost 1 1 


76 



Ernest Milton Stauffer: Personnel 
manager. Barrett. Haentjens and Co.. 
Hazleton. Pa. 

Richard Leon Steinberg: Studying 
toward M.B.A. at New York Univer- 
sity. 

Gary Nelson Stiegler: Industrial 
Sales Training. Republic Steel Corp.. 
manufacturing division. Youngstown. 
Ohio. 

Kennetli R. Stoker: Teaching Ger- 
man. Wayne Central and Marion Cen- 
tral Schools. Will serve as group 
chaperone for the American Institute 
of Foreign Study Program. Salzburg. 
Austria, in the summer. 

Catherine Lynn Strese: Vocal music 
teacher, Pennsville (N.J.) H.S. 

Nancy Joanne Stroup: Graduate 
assistant in special education. Blooms- 
burg State College. 

Dennis Anthony Surovcik: Public 
accounting. Price Waterhouse and 
Co., New York City. 

Carol A n n Sutcliffe: Missionary 
under Board of American Missions, 



Lutheran Church in America, serving 
her first assignment in a Philadelphia 
parish. 

Kenneth Peter Swarthout: Graduate 
study. Kent (Ohio) State University. 

Helen Swartz Chamberlain: Home- 
maker and mother. 

Frederick Richard Swavely: Re- 
search chemist. Firestone Plastics Co.. 
Pottstown, Pa. 

Marsha Miriam Tamke: Head of 
the sales lead desk of W. A. Benja- 
min. Inc.. science book publishers in 
New York City. 

Maureen Thomas S'uiey: German 
instructor. Centerville Jr. H.S.. Hemp- 
field Union School District, Landis- 
ville. Pa. 

Alison Wood Townsend: English 
teacher. Neshaminy Jr. H.S.. Newton- 
Langhorne. Pa. 

Carolyn L. Trilt: Elementary music 
teacher. West York Area School Dis- 
trict. York. Pa. 

D a v i d Stephan Unger: Teaching 
American history. Blue Mountain H. 



S.. Cressona. Pa. Plans graduate stud) 
at Temple University. 

Stephen M. Vak: Teaching mathe- 
matics and coaching. Schuylkill Haven 
(Pa.) School District. 

Pamela Andre VanDyke: First year 
student nurse. Hahnemann Medical 
College and Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing. 

Dennis Lee VanName: Manager. 
New Jersey Rivet Co., Camden. N.J. 

Robert Craig Vogel: Dealing in 
real estate and insurance appraisals 
for William Vogel III Realtors. Over- 
brook Hills. Pa. 

Joan Elizabeth Vondercrone: Ele- 
mentary vocal and instrumental teach- 
er, Beaver Creek Elementary School, 
Downingtown, Pa. 

Francis Joseph Voltero: Teacher. 
Shamokin (Pa.) H.S.. and doing grad- 
uate work at Bloomsburg State Col- 
lege. 

Gregory Allan Walter: Grade con- 
trol engineer in Kerr-McGee's Nu- 
clear Fuels Division. Grants. N. Mex. 

Evelyn A. War: Graduate study in 
music. University of Vermont. 

Virginia Ellen Ward: Caseworker. 
Sussex County Welfare Board. New- 
ton. N.J. 

Anthony Michael Weaver: Process 
control department. Owens - Corning 
Fiberglas Corp.. Huntingdon, Pa. 

Trixanna Weber: Social worker. 
State Department of Public Welfare. 
Wilmington. Del. 

\nii Weller: Elementary music 
teacher. Shamokin (Pa.) Area School 
District. 

Susan Love Washing: English 
teacher. Ramsey (N.J.) H.S.. and grad- 
uate study at Fairleigh Dickinson 
University. 

Leonard Albert Willinsky: News- 
man and Lancaster (Pa.) correspond- 
ent for WSBA Radio. York Susque- 
hanna Broadcasting Co. 

Linda Ruth Woolbert: Teaching 7th 
and Sth grade English. Nome (Alaska) 
High School. 

Harriet Yeager Blank: Homemak- 
er and mother. Plans graduate study 
in psychology. 

Suzanne Yenchko: Itinerary coordi- 
nator. Republican State Committee. 
Harrisburg. 

Richard Conrad Young: Systems 
analyst, Proctor and Gamble, Cincin- 
nati. 

Ralph G. Ziegler: Completed Air 
Force basic trainine at Lackland AFB 



WINTER 1969 



41 



and is now in accounting and finance 
training at Sheppard AFB, Tex. 

Ricliarcl Joseph Ziobro: Graduate 
study. University of Iowa at Iowa 
City, working toward M. A. in 
English. 

THE EX '68s 

Ellen Biers Market: Housewife and 
living in Anchorage, Alaska, where 
her husband, Edwin M. Jr. '66 is 
with the U.S. Air Force. 

Stephanie J. Blank: Supervisor, 
auditing department. Bioren & Co., 
Inc.. Philadelphia brokerage firm. 

Pfc. James A. Borne: RA 11882047, 
7th RRFS, APO San Francisco, Calif. 
96386. 

William R. Brower: Employed by 
Curtis Publishing Co., Sharon Hill, 
Pa. Also attending PMC Colleges. 

James T. Frutchey Jr.: U.S. Naval 
Air Force. 

Barbara Fnlmer: Completing work 
for the B.S. in music at Mansfield 
State College. 

Jane Hall Williams: Unit control. 
Auerbachs, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Nancy Lee Rice: Graduate of Berk- 
eley Secretarial School, East Orange, 
N.J. 

Lynn McAllister: Completing re- 
quirements for bachelor's degree at 
Shippensburg State College. 

Pamela McCollough Geist: Assist- 
ant manager, Landis Valley Motor 
Inn. Lancaster, Pa. 

Sharon Milligan Perry: Housewife, 
Knob Noster, Mo. 65336. 

Mary Morgan Wagner: Graduate 
of the Katharine Gibbs School and 
employed by Myers-Fisher Company, 
New York City. 



Michael J. Pakoskey: Terminal op- 
erator, Atlantic Richfield Co., Nor- 
thumberland, Pa. 

John P. Phillips: Airman 7206th 
Support Group, Athenai Airport. 
Greece, accounting specialist, Athens. 

William R. Plummer: Claims field 
representative. General Accident 
Fire and Life Insurance Co.. Harris- 
burg. 

Charles William Reidell: Teaching 
mathematics, Lewisburg (Pa.) H.S. 

Nancy Rosengarten Bart: House- 
wife. 

Susan Sarhacher Pence: Working 
toward master of library science. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

A 1C Robert Schilpp: AF11828116, 
Box 993, APO San Francisco, Calif. 
96264. Serving with the U.S. Air 
Force, assigned to Kunsan Air Force 
Base, South Korea. 

Joan Seabrook: 3rd grade teacher, 
W e 1 1 e r Road Elementary School. 
Silver Spring, Md. 

Ann M. Sheppard: Flight attendant. 
Eastern Airlines, Coral Gables, Fla. 

Airman John R. Sliver: U.S. Navy. 
Pensacola, Fla. 

Susan Smith Shufelt: New England 
Life Insurance Co., San Francisco. 
Calif. 

Andrew Lee Thibadeau: U.S. Air 
Force. 

Susan Tischler Roberts: Attending 
Ithaca College, majoring in physical 
therapy. 

John C. Whitten: Director of music, 
Broome Jr. H.S.. Rockville. Md. Mar- 
ried Susan H. Hale. Address: 2022 
Georgian Woods PI. #44, Wheaton, 
Md. 20902. 



John Barr Resigns as SU Coach 



John E. Barr has announced his 
resignation as varsity basketball 
and golf coach at Susquehanna, 
effective at the end of the current 
academic year. He has accepted 
a position as vice president for 
sales for Marshall-Curtis, a Har- 
risburg securities underwriting 
firm. 

An All-American forward at 
Penn State in 1941 and later a 
professional basketball player 
and coach, Barr was head men- 



tor for the Crusader hoopsters 
for 12 seasons, winning 107 
games and losing 153. His best 
season was 1962-63 when his 
charges posted a 20-4 record. 
Under his tutelage, they also 
had records of 17-6 in 1960-61 
and 15-5 in 1961-62. 

A part-time staffer who also 
sells securities, Barr is now start- 
ing his sixth season as SU golf 
coach. His five - year win - loss 
record is 32-14. 



Webe 
Alunr 



The midwinter Alumni 
Workshop, an annual ac- 
tivity since 1960, was held 
January 25 for the first 
time in the new Campus 
Center. Highlighting t h e 
luncheon session were sur- 
prise presentations to Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Gustave W. 
Weber in appreciation for 
their ten years at the Uni- 
versity. Praising Mrs. 
Weber's fulfillment of the 
role of campus hostess, 
Louise Mehring Koontz '35 
presented (photo, right) a 
silver tray appropriately 
engraved to "Susquehanna's 
First Lady." Awards Chair- 
man Chet Rowe '52 paid 
tribute to Dr. Weber's dec- 
ade of leadership particu- 
larly as it involved alumni 
and rebuilding of the col- 
lege image, and bestowed 
upon the President a special 
Alumni Award medal for 
Service. 



Right, above, head tablets at fi 
luncheon were Dorothy Turner 
Blanche Forney Rogers '42, EH 
Shobert, Mrs. Gustave Weber, 
Marlyn Fetterolf, President We 
er, Mabel Kinzey Fetterolf '24, I 
Rogers. Voylet Dietz Carr '52, 
Mrs. Shobert. Buss Carr '52. 
Chet Rowe. 



42 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



(~ 



Dnored at 
orkshop 






Making plun\ un \la\ 2-4 were, top. Alumni Weekend Com- 
mittee: Bob Gundaker '64, Henry Hopkins '44, Roger 
Holtzapple '59. Jim Peters '49, Raymond Lubold '13. Reu- 
ben Henry '54, Chairman Harry Butts '48, Dorothy Turner 
'36. Bottom. Awards Committee: Vernon Blough '31, 
George Liddington '54, Chairman Chester Rowe '52. Dale 
Bring/nan '48, Don Wissinger '50. Louise Mehring 
Koontz. '35. Timothy Barnes '35. 




>Tv 








University Relations Committee consists of Bill 
Roberts '29, Carl Mover '63, Alan Lovell '70. 
Chairman Bill Davenport '53 and Nancy Davis 
Rauh '61. Bottom, pictured together are Loyalty 
Fund and Club Activities. Seated, clockwise: 
Club Activities Chairman Ed Rogers '42, Donald 
Spooner '43, Al Carpenter '24, Dorothy Eilhardt 
Gundrum '48. Paul Wagner '50, Frank Fetterolf 
'48, Ken Erdley '55, Lorraine Rarick Liddington 
'52, Winifred Myers O'Dell '49. Standing: Develop- 
ment Director Skip Wieder, A A President Marly n 
Fetterolf '23, Loyalty Fund Chairman Erie Shobert 
'35, Jim Gehris '50, Rip Gar man '30. 



WINTER 1969 



43 



The Susquehanna Rlumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 




POSTMASTER: Please notify if undelivered. 

Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



lU 



-y^CO^ 



SPRING 1969 



Susquehanna Alumnus 




IN MEMORIAM 



WILLIAM MARION SCHNURE was born on May 17, 1877 and died 
on June 15, 1969. Ninety-two is an advanced age, but on his 92nd 
birthday Billy Schnure was still talking about Susquehanna, proud of 
its progress in recent years, and passionately enthused about plans for 
the future. He was part of Susquehanna, and Susquehanna was part 
of him. 

A direct descendant of Major Anthony Selin, the founder of 
Selinsgrove, Billy attended the Preparatory School of Missionary In- 
stitute and when the name Susquehanna University was adopted he 
enrolled in the Class of 1899. Wishing to study electrical engineering, 
however, he transferred to Penn State, graduated there in 1900, and 
joined the Pennsylvania Railroad as supervisor of signals in Baltimore. 
Returning to the area in 1912, he became associated with the First 
National Bank of Selins Grove, which had been established by his 
grandfather George D. Schnure, one of the Institute's first Board mem- 
bers, in 1864. For several years young Schnure was vice president of 
the bank. In 1926 he purchased the Air Seal Vault Company, now 
known as the Central Penn Wilbert Vault Company and operated by 
his son Howard H. Schnure. 

An ardent and thorough historian — not only of the Selinsgrove 
area but also of the Civil War, railroads, and transportation in general 
— he was active in the Pennsylvania, Snyder County and Northumber- 
land County Historical Societies. He was the author of two volumes 
of Selinsgrove Chronology 1700- J 920 and of an unpublished historical 
novel. Among many important affiliations, he held membership in the 
Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the Revolution and the Select So- 
ciety of the Cincinnati. He was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church 
and one of the founders of Boy Scouting in Selinsgrove. His wife, the 
former Margaret Pittet, preceded him in death last January (page 42). 
Among his survivors are daughter Jane Schnure '47, assistant librarian 
at Susquehanna, and grandchildren Sara Schnure Lindsay '65 and 
James P. Schnure x'69. 

Billy Schnure was an inquisitive scholar. His mind was full of 
well-organized facts which usually could be recalled at a moment's 
notice. He was an invaluable source of information about Selinsgrove, 
the University, or any other topic which struck his fancy. There are 
those who said he knew every blade of grass on the Susquehanna 
campus. An open, kindly heart, a noble soul, a warm friend — it is 
one of life's blessings to have known him. 




The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol. 38 



SPRING 1969 



No. 3 



Susquehanna University 
Alumni Association 



Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42, president; Harry W. Butts 
Jr. '48, Dr. Erie I. Shobert II '35, vice presidents; 
Dorothy Turner '36, recording secretary; Chester G. 
Rowe '52, treasurer; Dr. John J. Houtz '08, his- 
torian; Lawrence M. Isaacs '43, Louise Mehring 
Koontz '35, representatives on the University Board 
of Directors; Simon B Rhoads '30, Jack P. Shipe '40, 
representatives on the Athletic Committee. 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 
1970: Timothy E. Barnes '35, The Rev. Dale S. 
Bnngman '48, Dr. James C. Gehris '50, Dorothy 
Eilhardt Gundrum '48, Nancy Davis Raab '61. Term 
expiring 1971: George E. Bantley '41, William C. 
Davenport '53, George C. Liddmgton '54, Dr. Bryce 
E. Nicodemus '31, Shirley A. Young '51 . Term ex- 
piring 1972: Marsh Bogar '51, Robert A. Gabrenya 
'40, W. Reuben Henry '54, William H. Kahl '62, W. 
Alfred Streamer '26. 



CONTENTS 



Advisory Council Looks Toward The Future 



Alumni Day A Big One 



10 



Who's In Charge? 15 

Special Report from Editorial Projects for Education 



Track Team Is Almost Undefeated 

Minutes of Alumni Association Meeting 

SU Sports 

hx Ron Berkheimer 



31 
33 
34 



THE COVER 

Freshman sprint star Bob Ellis wins the 220- 
yard-dash over runners from Bucknell and 
Lycoming in the Alumni Day triangular track 
meet. This season was a great one for the 
Crusader cindermen; read about it in the 
article beginning on page 31. 



Susquehannans On Parade 35 

i Do" 40 

Born Crusaders 41 

Deaths 41 

Carr's Column 43 

by Buss Carr '52 



Editor 
GEORGE R F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writers 

RONALD E BERKHEIMER 

MARGARET F ERNST 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24. 1912. Publish- 
ed four times a year by Susquehanna University. Selinsgrove, Pa. 



SPRING 1969 



Advisory Counci 
Looks Toward 
The Future 



Some students may spend two of their four under- 
graduate years abroad or studying at other colleges 
and universities. 

Substantial curriculum revisions may have to 
be made every five years. 

Freshman and sophomore classes could shrink 
in size while junior and senior classes grow larger 
with the addition of numerous transfer students from 
community and junior colleges. 

These are just a few of the developments Sus- 
quehanna may have to adjust to as it attempts to 
keep pace with the educational demands of a rapidly 
changing society, the members of the University's 
newly formed Advisory Council were told recently. 

Comprised primarily of alumni, the 52-member 
Council will provide President Gustave Weber and 
the Board of Directors with advice on a variety of 
matters affecting Susquehanna's future. 

Jack Shipe '40 of Herndon, Pa., former director 
of manufacturing for Creative Playthings, a division 




SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



SUSOUtn 



rw 



of CBS, Inc., is chairman of the Council. Edward 
F. Pfeiffer '50, Northumberland (Pa.) insurance 
broker, is vice chairman. Other members include 
attorneys, physicians, bankers, clergymen and educa- 
tors. 

Several faculty members and administrators also 
were asked to serve on the Council, along with a few 
community residents who have aided or shown an 
interest in the University. An effort was made to 
select persons of various ages. All appointments are 
for a two-year period. 

The first meeting of the blue-ribbon group, held 
March 21 and 22 in the new Campus Center, was 
devoted mainly to orientation. Dean Wilhelm Reun- 
ing; Dr. Howard E. DeMott, head of the Biology 
Department and a member of the faculty for more 
than 20 years; President Weber; and Homer W. 
Wieder, assistant to the president for development 
and long range planning, spoke to the Council. 
Their remarks dealt with both the present and future 
of the university — its strengths, problems, needs and 
philosophy. 

A topically-arranged summary of their observa- 
tions follows. 

GOALS AND PURPOSES 

Dr. Reuning emphasized the concept of a uni- 
versity as "a forum for the free exploration of all 
ideas." The goal of higher education, he said, 
"should never be to indoctrinate. It must always 
be to seek the truth." 

The Dean took issue with those scholars who 
espouse the view that the liberal arts are dead, but 
he did indicate his belief that the traditional concept 
of a liberal arts education should be broadened to 
reflect the larger interests of a total society. "We 
must move the campus community into the center 
of society, with all its vicissitudes," he added. 

It was noted that there are no immediate plans 
to expand enrollment beyond 1500. Most of the 
physical facilities of the campus were constructed 
with this figure in mind. In addition, the speakers 
expressed the belief that Susquehanna does not have 
the resources — faculty, finances or facilities — for a 




Dr. DeMott addresses 

Susquehanna's new Advisory Council 

in the Campus Center. 

Ed Pfeiffer is the moderator. 



top graduate program and therefore must concen- 
trate instead on maintaining a high quality of under- 
graduate instruction. 

CURRICULUM 

Dean Reuning said the curriculum of any col- 
lege must expose the student to the general and the- 
oretical and yet must be specific enough to prepare 
graduates for a vocation. 

"We must avoid boredom of the students. The 
worst thing that can happen to you is boredom and 
this can creep into a curriculum." he continued. 

He predicted a trend away from the pre-pack- 
aged curricula of years ago and toward a greater 



SPRING 1969 



freedom of choice for students within general sub- 
ject areas. Although he regards more frequent 
changes in curriculum as inevitable, he cautioned 
against change for its own sake. 

STUDENT UNREST 

Dr. DeMott said the students of the 1950s are 
often referred to as the "quiet generation," but that 
he is more inclined to call them the "future-orient- 
ed generation." 

These students were primarily interested in 
preparing for their future employment. "They 
knew what they wanted and they had a pretty good 
idea of how to get it. But they knew little of what 
was going on off the campus," he remarked. "To- 
day's students are more socially conscious and a 
great many want to find some way to serve 
mankind, hoping in the process to find happiness 
for themselves. At the same time, many have no 
definite vocational goals. They are now-oriented." 

Dr. DeMott said the relevance of college pro- 
grams must be explored and that this is being done 
at Susquehanna. 

President Weber also spoke of the idealism of 
today's students. He said students see or read 
about the plight of the poor and conditions in the 
ghettos "while billions of dollars appear to be wasted 
in Vietnam." Adult society seems to them to be a 
"sham." 

"When you are young and can't see any 
relevance in what you are doing . . . this leads to a 
great deal of unrest," Dr. Weber remarked. 

The President traced many of the more de- 
structive aspects of student behavior to the incidents 
at Berkeley in 1964. He said educators find it dif- 
ficult to understand why the trouble began at Berke- 
ley, an institution with an eminent faculty, excellent 
facilities and a most progressive attitude. 

In many cases, students "are trying to have 
power without the concomitant background and 
knowledge to do what they think they can do, but 
probably couldn't do better than anyone else," Dr. 
Weber added. If the students do not show some 
restraint, "the very things they are asking for — 
freedom and responsibility — will be defeated by their 
own actions. Society will not tolerate chaos for 
long, and order may be restored by fiat." 



Dr. Weber said 95 percent of Susquehanna's 
students are mature and responsible and that the 
University has recognized this by placing them in 
positions of responsibility. Students are being al- 
lowed to attend meetings of the finance and building 
and grounds committees of the Board of Directors 
and to sit on many faculty and administrative com- 
mittees. 

"They will continue to be given responsibility 
commensurate with their ability to handle it," the 
President said. 

FACULTY 

Dr. Reuning pointed out that the quality of 
instruction at any college or university depends 
upon its faculty. Regardless of how well the cur- 
riculum is constructed, it is the faculty which must 
inspire the students. Susquehanna must do every- 
thing it can to recruit good faculty members and 
then it must retain them. "A good faculty cannot 
be molded if there is a constant turnover," he de- 
clared. 

It also was noted that since Susquehanna is 
basically a teaching institution, the emphasis must 
remain on attracting those faculty members who 
are teaching-oriented and who consider research a 
secondary objective. 

Dr. DeMott suggested that the turnover among 
faculty members may inevitably be higher than i 
many other professions. He said many of today's 
scholars are more loyal to their discipline than to 



m 



English prof Charles Igoe, Dr. George Backer 
and Orville I.auver are interested participants. 



Dick Leib and Fred Slack have a 

good laugh over one of the punch lines. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



I 





Bob Heir and Rip Garman listen intently 
to President Weber's presentation. 



Linda Metzel '70 of York, Pa. is one of tlie 
students invited to sit in. Site is president of 
the newly-installed campus chapter of 
Pi Delta Phi. French honorary. 



the institutions which employ them and are there- 
fore a transient and mobile group. 

"Here at Susquehanna a faculty member is 
free to explore all aspects of his discipline. He can 
use any method of teaching so long as it is effective. 
But academic freedom also includes a responsibility 
to the institution. He must remember that his in- 
stitution and his profession are judged by his ut- 
terances," Dr. DeMott said. 

Faculty salaries have doubled during the past 
10 years and now average $10,000. It is felt that 
this figure will have to be increased to $15,000 by 
1976-77 if the University is to continue attracting 
good faculty members. 

COMMUNITY RELATIONS 

All speakers noted that there are both ad- 
vantages and disadvantages to Susquehanna's loca- 
tion in a predominately rural area. Dr. Reuning 
pointed out that most of the students are from urban 
communities and therefore have an intense interest 
in urban problems. Students are coming to the col- 
lege from a broader geographic area than in the 
past (22 states and 5 foreign countries) and the 
admissions staff has been most active in trying to 
recruit a more diversified student body. 

Mr. Wieder said that students genuinely in- 
terested in helping to solve social problems will find 
numerous opportunities in and around Selinsgrove, 
which the federal government considers a part of 
"Appalachia." 

Predicting a "continued and increased" involve- 
ment in the community, Wieder declared that the 
"ivory tower concept is a thing of the past." 

Susquehanna has begun or is planning a number 
of projects which will utilize student energies in serv- 
ing the community. Social welfare agencies in sev- 
eral counties have been contacted and encouraged 
to seek the aid of the University's students and staff. 





Skip Wieder makes a point during intermission. 



Lou Santangelo and Bruce Bell are studies in concentration. 



About 30 Susquehanna students served as tutors 
this spring to Selinsgrove High School students 
having difficulties with their studies. It is hoped 
that financial support will be available for the pro- 
gram next year and that the tutoring will be offered 
primarily to "disadvantaged" high school students. 

Susquehanna's Department of Geological Sci- 
ences is planning a rather comprehensive study of 
water conditions in the Susquehanna Valley which 
should be of value to conservationists. 

CHURCH AFFILIATION 

President Weber noted that some colleges have 
severed their connection with the church bodies 
which founded and for many years helped to sup- 
port them. In some instances, the colleges were 
forced to do this for financial reasons. With no 
church affiliation, they were able to obtain larger 
amounts of State aid. 

The President said Susquehanna is grateful for 
the funds it receives from the Lutheran Church in 
America's Central Pennsylvania Synod and hopes 
that such support may continue for many years to 
come. 

Dr. Weber also hopes that a close spiritual re- 
lationship with the Church can be maintained. "Ed- 



ucation without character only breeds a finer type 
of criminal," he added. 

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT 

A new library, a physical education center, and 
a men's dormitory are buildings the University hopes 
to construct during the next several years. 

The library is expected to cost about $1.5 
million and to be ready for use by September of 
1971. It will have 40,000 to 50,000 square feet 
of floor space and stacks for 200,000 volumes. Al- 
though the present library was enlarged in 1958, it 
has a floor area of only 17,000 square feet and 
space for 80,000 volumes. 

President Weber said the new library is being 
designed so that most of the stack areas can be 
removed and replaced with study carrels or machines 
for viewing microfilm. New techniques in micro- 
filming are expected to revolutionize future libraries. 
Information contained on film will be stored in a 
fraction of the space now devoted to stacks of 
books. 

In order to expand enrollment to 1500, Sus- 
quehanna needs another men's dormitory. Hope- 
fully, it will be under construction sometime next 
vear. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



MEMBERS OF SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY ADVISORY COUNCIL 



Douglas E. Arthur '49, Butler, Pa. 

Resident Vice President, Nationwide Ins. 

Dr. George B. Bzcker '54, Forty Fort, Pa, 
Physician 

Merle A. Beam '22, Windber, Pa. 
Public Relations 

C Welty Beard, Selinsgrove 

Retired P.P.&L. construction foreman 

Bruce A. Bell '55, Lutherville, Md. 

District Sales Mgr., Johnson & Johnson 

Ray Bowen, Selinsgrove 

Sales, construction equipment 

Harry W. Butts '48, Detroit, Mich. 
District Mgr., Burroughs Corp. 

William C. Davenport '53, Camp Hill, Pa. 
Marketing Mgr., Aetna Life & Casualty 

Dr. Howard E. DeMott, Selinsgrove 
Biology professor, S.U. 

W. Donald Fisher '51, Selinsgrove 
Certified Public Accountant 

Raymond P. Garman '30, Red Bank, NJ. 
Chemistry teacher, Red Bank H.S. 

Dr. James C. Gehris '50, Shamokin, Pa. 
Physician 

Laird S. Gemberling '33, Selinsgrove 
Attorney 

Eugene H. Gundrum '48, Bethel Park, Pa. 
Asst. Mgr., Union Trust Office, 
Mellon Nat'l Bank 

Paul M. Haines '31, Hyattsville, Md. 
Program Analyst, General Services 
Administration 

Dr. John F. Hanna '35, State College, Pa. 
Coordinator, Business and Data Proces- 
sing Education, State College Area 
Schools 

Robert L. Herr '39, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Insurance broker 



Raymond G. Hochstuhl '47, Bloomfield, N.J. 
Data Processing Mgr., A.T.&T. 

T. Edgar Hutchison '34, Camp Hill, Pa. 
Retired Sales Mgr., Firestone Tire & 
Rubber 

Charles J. Igoe, Selinsgrove 
Education professor, S.U. 

William H. Kahl '62, Selinsgrove 
Business 

Henry J. Keil '39, Leonia, NJ. 

Heating and air conditioning executive 

Ruth Bergstresser Koch '34, Hazleton, Pa. 
Homemaker 

Florence Rothermel Latsha '40, 
Dalmatia, Pa. 
Teacher, Line Mountain H.S. 

Orville H. Lauver '54, York, Pa. 
Investments executive 

Raymond C. Lauver '50, Chatham, NJ. 
Partner, Price Waterhouse & Co. 

Richard C. Leib, Sunbury, Pa. 
Insurance broker 

Graydon I. Lose '54, Arlington, Va. 
Staff assistant. The Pentagon 

Paul Lucas '38, Chambersburg, Pa. 

Music supervisor, Chambersburg Schools 

George O. Machlan, Selinsgrove 
Accounting professor, S.U. 

Stephen J. Martmec '35, Coaldale, Pa. 
School administrator 

Milton H. Maslin '65, Rosemont, Pa. 

Engineering programmer, Burroughs Corp. 

Albert P. Molinaro Jr. '50, Upper Montclair, 
NJ. 
Vice President, Lewis & Gilman Adv. 

Charles A. Morris '49, Camp Hill, Pa. 
Account Mgr , Burroughs Corp. 



Dr. Glenn L. Musser '41, Alexandria, Va. 

Asst. Director for Limited Warfare, 

Dept. of Navy 
Dr. Bryce E. Nicodemus '31, Lewistown, Pa. 

Physician 
Dr. Paul D. Ochenrider '39, Wrightsville, Pa. 

Physician 
Edward F. Pfeiffer '50, Northumberland, Pa. 

Insurance 
Dr. Neil H. Potter, Selinsgrove 

Chemistry professor, S.U. 
Dr. Wilhelm Reuning, Selinsgrove 

Dean, S.U. 
Charles W. Ritter, Selinsgrove 

Wholesale distributor 
Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42, Yardley, Pa. 

Research engineer, R.C A. 
Allen I. Rowe '60, Princeton, NJ. 

Asst. Controller, Princeton University 
Louis F. Santangelo '50, Hershey, Pa. 

Public Relations Director, Hershey Foods 
Richard A. Scharfe '31, Caldwell, NJ. 

Food broker 
Harold E. Shaffer '40, West Chester, Pa. 

Social Studies professor, West Chester 

State College 
Dr. Nevin C. T. Shaffer '49, Allentown, Pa. 

Dentist 
Jack P. Shipe '40, Herndon, Pa. 

Retired toy manufacturer 
Jacob M. Spangler '52, Lebanon, N.J. 

General Operations Mgr., West Jersey 

Telephone 
Philip R. Templin '42, Oakmont, Pa. 

Senior research chemist. Gulf 
John H. Wall '30, Evansville, fnd. 

Consultant, Clevite Corp. 
Arthur A. Zimmerman '57, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Accountant, Bethlehem Steel 



Construction of the new physical education 
center is expected to begin in 1972. 

FINANCING 

Spiraling costs are probably the most menacing 
problem faced by small colleges today, threatening 
more than a few such institutions with extinction. 

tk The threat is real," Wieder told Council mem- 
bers. "Although fees are increasing, costs are rising 
even faster. The future of the small liberal arts 
college is in danger and with its demise would come 
a monolithic system of education that endangers 
fundamental democratic values." 

Wieder said he hoped his remarks would not 
be interpreted as a criticism of the present state- 
college system, but that he is convinced of the need 
for both private and state schools. 



"If, indeed, many private colleges do fall by the 
wayside, one of the main reasons will be that they 
have tried to be 'all things to all people/ " he con- 
tinued. "Growth and specialization are necessary 
to some degree today, but at the smaller colleges 
this can mean a dilution of the educational product." 

Wieder said that if Susquehanna is to survive 
"we must decide what we are going to do and do it 
well. We must realize our limitations and be satisfied 
with our assigned function — that of a small liberal 
education college where size and specialization do 
not impair the teacher-student relationship." 

He said one of Susquehanna's fund - raising 
goals should be to substantially increase its endow- 
ment. At present, endowment provides less than 
two percent of the University's income. Wieder 
would like to see this figure boosted to 10 percent. 



SPRING 1969 




Ongkar Narayan '47 and his attractive family have a good time 
greeting old friends as they arrive at Susquehanna for the 
highly successful 1969 Alumni Weekend. A former college teacher in 
Canada and Guyana, he is now a doctoral candidate at Venn State. 



Alumni Day / 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



May Queen Marilyn Kausch of Teaneck, \.J. is escorted to 
her Coronation by Bob Off '70 of Pittsburgh. Below: Queen 
Marilyn is flanked by Iter Court — seated: Donna Hilton, 
Downingtown, Pa.; Ladies-in-waiting Linda laeger. Pottstown, 
Pa. and Harriet Horn, Tannersville, Pa.: Linda Whitenight, 
Bloomsburg, Pa. Standing: Shirley Jones, Westjield, S.J.; 
Virgil Franks. Levittown, Pa.: Carol Riley. Willow Grove, 
Pa. All are 1969 graduates. 





Alice Moore '70, editor of the '69 Lanthorn, presents 
the dedicatory citations to Alfred J. Krahmer, librarian, 
and Warren J. Pirie '49, director of psychological 
services. The yearbook dedication took place following 
Coronation ceremonies on Friday evening, May 2. 



Sig One 




SPRING 1969 





This year's Broadway musical. Cole Porter's "Any tiling Goes, 
was a big hit in Friday night and Saturday afternoon 
performances. At left: Dennis Nasitka of Monterey Park, 
Calif., as Billy Crocker, and Melinda Mark '69 of 
Lancaster, Pa., as Reno Sweeney. Above: Randy Gehret '69 
of Highspire, Pa., as Sir Evelyn Oakleigh; Miss Mark: and 
Linda laeger '69, of Potlstown, Pa., as Hope Harcourt. 



Left: Nasitka. a Bucknell graduate student and dormitory head counselor at 
Susquehanna, Miss Mark, and Peter Jarjisian '69 of Drexel Hill, Pa., 
as Moonface, sing a song together. Right: Melinda Mark was a real 
crowd-pleaser as she belted out such favorites as "Blow Gabriel Blow" and 
"I Get a Kick Out of You" which Ethel Merman made famous 35 years ago. 




12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 





1969 Alumni Award winners include Barry L. Jackson of Morrisville, Pa. and Judith 
A. Wittosch of Rutherford, X.J., Senior Man and Woman Most Typifying the Ideals 
of Susquehanna; W. Alfred Streamer '26, retired Philadelphia printing executive. 
now of State College, Pa., For Service: and Dr. Erie I. Shohert II. reseat ch 
engineer of St. Marys, Pa. Left: Two of the veteran alumni recognized at the 
Awards Luncheon are Dr. and Mrs. John F. '15 and Mary Wagner Harkins '16 o 
Stale College. Roses are being bestowed by Linda laeger and Harriet Horn of the 
Max Court. In other Saturday activities, Pross Mellon '65 and Skip Jacobs '65, 
perennial Raft Race winners, were finally defeated by a crew from Lambda Chi Alpha 
composed of Jeff Goria '71. Grew Reppa '71 and Paul Wenske '69. 



tffcfA**"^ 







13 




! 




1 




From the left: Hurry Butts '48, chairman of the weekend activities, 
greets a record luncheon turnout. Mrs. G. Morris Smith, widow of 
S.U.'s tenth president, is a surprise visitor. President Weber congratulates . 
the new Alumni Association president, Ed Rogers '42 of Yardley, Pa. 




Dr. Hill Janson '44, preacher for Sunday's Worship 
Service, pauses for a photo in the chancel of 
Chapel Auditorium. Right: Wayne Arnold '71 of 
Harrisburg, in the title role, and William 
Sheldon '71 of Wildwood Crest, N.J., as one of the 
murderers, performed in Macbeth, Susquehanna's 
20th annual Shakespearean Festival. 



14 




A Special Report 



Who's 

in 
Charge ? 

Trustees . . . presidents . . .faculty . . . students, past and present: 
who governs this society that roe call 'the academic community'? 



The cry has been heard on many a campus 
this year. It came from the campus neigh- 
borhood, from state legislatures, from cor- 
porations trying to recruit students as em- 
ployees, from the armed services, from the donors of 
funds, from congressional committees, from church 
groups, from the press, and even from the police: 
"Who's in charge there?" 

Surprisingly the cry also came from "inside" the 
colleges and universities — from students and alumni, 
from faculty members and administrators, and even 
from presidents and trustees: 
"Who's in charge here?" 

And there was, on occasion, this variation: "Who 
should be in charge here?" 

Strange questions to ask about these highly 
organized institutions of our highly organ- 
i ized society? A sign, as some have said, that 
our colleges and universities are hopelessly 
chaotic, that they need more "direction," that they 
have lagged behind other institutions of our society 
in organizing themselves into smooth-running, 
efficient mechanisms? 

Or do such explanations miss the point? Do they 
overlook much of the complexity and subtlety (and 
perhaps some of the genius) of America's higher 
educational enterprise? 

It is important to try to know. 



Here is one reason: 

► Nearly 7-million students are now enrolled in 
the nation's colleges and universities. Eight years 
hence, the total will have rocketed past 9.3-million. 
The conclusion is inescapable: what affects our col- 
leges and universities will affect unprecedented 
numbers of our people — and, in unprecedented 
ways, the American character. 

Here is another: 

► "The campus reverberates today perhaps in 
part because so many have come to regard [it] as 
the most promising of all institutions for developing 
cures for society's ills." [Lloyd H. Elliott, president 
of George Washington University] 

Here is another: 

► "Men must be discriminating appraisers of 
their society, knowing coolly and precisely what it is 
about society that thwarts or limits them and there- 
fore needs modification. 

"And so they must be discriminating protectors 
of their institutions, preserving those features that 
nourish and strengthen them and make them more 
free." [John W. Gardner, at Cornell University] 

But who appraises our colleges and universities? 
Who decides whether (and how) they need modify- 
ing? Who determines what features to preserve; 
which features "nourish and strengthen them and 
make them more free?" In short: 

Who's in charge there? 



Who's in Charge— I 

The Trustees 



By the letter of the law, the people in 
charge of our colleges and universities are 
| the trustees or regents— 25,000 of them, 
according to the educated guess of their 
principal national organization, the Association of 
Governing Boards. 

"In the long history of higher education in 
America," said one astute observer recently 



Copyright 1969 

by Editorial Projects for Education, Inc. 




"trustees have seldom been cast in a heroic role." 
For decades they have been blamed for whatever 
faults people have found with the nation's colleges 
and universities. 

Trustees have been charged, variously, with 
representing the older generation, the white race, 
religious orthodoxy, political powerholders, business 
and economic conservatism — in short, The Estab- 
lishment. Other critics — among them orthodox 
theologians, political powerholders, business and 
economic conservatives — have accused trustees of 
not being Establishment enough. 

On occasion they have earned the criticisms. In 
the early days of American higher education, when 
most colleges were associated with churches, the 
trustees were usually clerics with stern ideas of what 
should and should not be taught in a church-related 
institution. They intruded freely in curriculums, 
courses, and the behavior of students and faculty 
members. 

On many Protestant campuses, around the turn 
of the century, the clerical influence was lessened 
and often withdrawn. Clergymen on their boards of 
trustees were replaced, in many instances, by 
businessmen, as the colleges and universities sought 
trustees who could underwrite their solvency. As 
state systems of higher education were founded, they 
too were put under the control of lay regents or 
trustees. 

Trustee-faculty conflicts grew. Infringements of 
academic freedom led to the founding, in 1915, of 
the American Association of University Professors. 
Through the association, faculty members developed 
and gained wide acceptance of strong principles of 
academic freedom and tenure. The conflicts eased — 
but even today many faculty members watch their 
institution's board of trustees guardedly. 

In the past several years, on some campuses, 
trustees have come under new kinds of attack. 

► At one university, students picketed a meeting 
of the governing board because two of its members, 
they said, led companies producing weapons used in 
the war in Vietnam. 

► On another campus, students (joined by some 
faculty members) charged that college funds had 
been invested in companies operating in racially 
divided South Africa. The investments, said the 
students, should be canceled; the board of trustees 
should be censured. 

► At a Catholic institution, two years ago, most 
students and faculty members went on strike be- 
cause the trustees (comprising 33 clerics and 1 1 lay- 



men) had dismissed a liberal theologian from the 
faculty. The board reinstated him, and the strike 
ended. A year ago the board was reconstituted to 
consist of 1 5 clerics and 1 5 laymen. (A similar shift 
to laymen on their governing boards is taking place 
at many Catholic colleges and universities.) 

► A state college president, ordered by his 
trustees to reopen his racially troubled campus, re- 
signed because, he said, he could not "reconcile 
effectively the conflicts between the trustees" and 
other groups at his institution. 

How do most trustees measure up to 
their responsibilities? How do they react 
to the lightning-bolts of criticism that, 
by their position, they naturally attract? 
We have talked in recent months with scores of 
trustees and have collected the written views of 
many others. Our conclusion: With some notable 
(and often highly vocal) exceptions, both the 
breadth and depth of many trustees' understanding 
of higher education's problems, including the touch- 
iness of their own position, are greater than most 
people suspect. 

Many boards of trustees, we found, are showing 
deep concern for the views of students and are going 
to extraordinary lengths to know them better. In- 
creasing numbers of boards are rewriting their 
by-laws to include students (as well as faculty 
members) in their membership. 

William S. Paley, chairman of cbs and a trustee 
of Columbia University, said after the student out- 
breaks on that troubled campus: 

"The university may seem [to students] like just 
one more example of the establishment's trying to 
run their lives without consulting them. ... It is 
essential that we make it possible for students to 
work for the correction of such conditions legitimate- 
ly and effectively rather than compulsively and 
violently. . . . 

"Legally the university is the board of trustees, 
but actually it is very largely the community of 
teachers and students. That a board of trustees 
should commit a university community to policies 
and actions without the components of that com- 
munity participating in discussions leading to such 
commitments has become obsolete and unworkable." 
Less often than one might expect, considering 
some of the provocations, did we find boards of 
trustees giving "knee-jerk" reactions even to the 
most extreme demands presented to them. Not very 
long ago, most boards might have rejected such 



The role of higher education's trustees often is misinterpreted and misunderstood 



As others seek a greater voice, presidents are natural targets for their attack 



demands out of hand; no longer. James M. Hester, 
the president of New York University, described the 
change: 

"To the activist mind, the fact that our board 
of trustees is legally entrusted with the property and 
privileges of operating an educational institution is 
more an affront than an acceptable fact. What is 
considered relevant is what is called the social 
reality, not the legal authority. 

"A decade ago the reaction of most trustees and 
presidents to assertions of this kind was a forceful 
statement of the rights and responsibilities of a 
private institution to do as it sees fit. While faculty 
control over the curriculum and, in many cases, 
student discipline was delegated by most boards 
long before, the power of the trustees to set university 
policy in other areas and to control the institution 
financially was unquestioned. 

"Ten years ago authoritarian answers to radical 
questions were frequently given with confidence. 
Now, however, authoritarian answers, which often 
provide emotional release when contemplated, some- 
how seem inappropriate when delivered." 

asa result, trustees everywhere are re-exam- 
/^L ining their role in the governance of 

/ ^ colleges and universities, and changes 
-A. M seem certain. Often the changes will be 
subtle, perhaps consisting of a shift in attitude, as 
President Hester suggested. But they will be none 
the less profound. 

In the process it seems likely that trustees, as 
Vice-Chancellor Ernest L. Boyer of the State Uni- 
versity of New York put it, will "recognize that the 
college is not only a place where past achievements 
are preserved and transmitted, but also a place 
where the conventional wisdom is constantly sub- 
jected to merciless scrutiny." 

Mr. Boyer continued: 

"A board member who accepts this fact will 
remain poised when surrounded by cross-currents of 
controversy. . . . He will come to view friction as an 
essential ingredient in the life of a university, and 
vigorous debate not as a sign of decadence, but of 
robust health. 

"And, in recognizing these facts for himself, the 
trustee will be equipped to do battle when the 
college — and implicitly the whole enterprise of 
higher education — is threatened by earnest primi- 
tives, single-minded fanatics, or calculating dema- 
gogues." 



Who's in charge? Every eight years, 
on the average, the members of a 
college or university board must 
provide a large part of the answer 
by reaching, in Vice-Chancellor Boyer's words, 
"the most crucial decision a trustee will ever be 
called upon to make." 

They must choose a new president for the place 
and, as they have done with his predecessors, dele- 
gate much of their authority to him. 

The task is not easy. At any given moment, it has 
been estimated, some 300 colleges and universities 
in the United States are looking for presidents. The 
qualifications are high, and the requirements are so 
exacting that many top-flight persons to whom a 
presidency is offered turn down the job. 

As the noise and violence level of campus protests 
has risen in recent years, the search for presidents 
has grown more difficult — and the turndowns more 
frequent. 

"Fellow targets," a speaker at a meeting of col- 
lege presidents and other administrators called his 
audience last fall. The audience laughed nervously. 
The description, they knew, was all too accurate. 

"Even in the absence of strife and disorder, 
academic administrators are the men caught in the 
middle as the defenders — and, altogether too often 
these days, the beleaguered defenders — of institu- 
tional integrity," Logan Wilson, president of the 
American Council on Education, has said. "Al- 
though college or university presidencies are still 
highly respected positions in our society, growing 
numbers of campus malcontents seem bent on doing 
everything they can to harass and disci-edit the 
performers of these key roles." 

This is unfortunate — the more so because the 
harassment frequently stems from a deep misunder- 
standing of the college administrator's function. 

The most successful administrators cast them- 
selves in a "staff" or "service" role, with the well- 
being of the faculty and students their central con- 
cern. Assuming such a role often takes a large 
measure of stamina and goodwill. At many in- 
stitutions, both faculty members and students ha- 
bitually blame administrators for whatever ails them 
— and it is hard for even the most dedicated of ad- 
ministrators to remember that they and the faculty- 
student critics are on the same side. 

"Without administrative leadership," philosopher 
Sidney Hook has observed, "every institution . . . 
runs down hill. The greatness of a university consists 




Who's in Charge —II 

The President 



A college's heart is its faculty. What part should it have in running the place? 



predominantly in the greatness of its faculty. But 
faculties ... do not themselves build great faculties. 
To build great faculties, administrative leadership 
is essential." 

Shortly after the start of this academic year, 
however, the American Council on Education re- 
leased the results of a survey of what 2,040 ad- 
ministrators, trustees, faculty members, and students 
foresaw for higher education in the 1970's. Most 
thought "the authority of top administrators in 
making broad policy decisions will be significantly 
eroded or diffused." And three out of four faculty 
members said they found the prospect "desirable." 

Who's in charge? Clearly the answer to that 
question changes with every passing day. 

With it all, the job of the president 
has grown to unprecedented propor- 
tions. The old responsibilities of lead- 
ing the faculty and students have 
proliferated. The new responsibilities of money- 
raising and business management have been heaped 
on top of them. The brief span of the typical presi- 
dency — about eight years — testifies to the roughness 
of the task. 

Yet a president and his administration very often 
exert a decisive influence in governing a college or 
university. One president can set a pace and tone 
that invigorate an entire institution. Another presi- 
dent can enervate it. 

At Columbia University, for instance, following 
last year's disturbances there, an impartial fact- 
finding commission headed by Archibald Cox traced 
much of the unrest among students and faculty 
members to "Columbia's organization and style of 
administration": 

"The administration of Columbia's affairs too 
often conveyed an attitude of authoritarianism and 
invited distrust. In part, the appearance resulted 
from style; for example, it gave affront to read that 
an influential university official was no more in- 
terested in student opinion on matters of intense 
concern to students than he was in their taste for 
strawberries. 

"In part, the appearance reflected the true state 
of affairs. . . . The president was unwilling to sur- 
render absolute disciplinary powers. In addition, 
government by improvisation seems to have been 
not an exception, but the rule." 

At San Francisco State College, last December, 
the leadership of Acting President S. I. Hayakawa, 



whether one approved it or not, was similarly de- 
cisive. He confronted student demonstrators, prom- 
ised to suspend any faculty members or students 
who disrupted the campus, reopened the institution 
under police protection, and then considered the 
dissidents' demands. 

But looking ahead, he said, "We must eventually 
put campus discipline in the hands of responsible 
faculty and student groups who will work coopera- 
tively with administrations . . . ." 



w 



'ho's in charge? "However the power 
mixture may be stirred," says Dean 
W. Donald Bowles of American Uni- 
versity, "in an institution aspiring to 
quality, the role of the faculty remains central. No 
president can prevail indefinitely without at least 
the tacit support of the faculty. Few deans will last 
more than a year or two if the faculty does not 
approve their policies." 

The power of the faculty in the academic ac- 
tivities of a college or university has long been recog- 
nized. Few boards of trustees would seriously con- 
sider infringing on the faculty's authority over what 
goes on in the classroom. As for the college or 
university president, he almost always would agree 
with McGeorge Bundy, president of the Ford Foun- 
dation, that he is, "on academic matters, the agent 
and not the master of the faculty." 

A joint statement by three major organizations 
representing trustees, presidents, and professors has 
spelled out the faculty's role in governing a college 
or university. It says, in part: 

"The faculty has primary responsibility for such 
fundamental areas as curriculum, subject matter 
and methods of instruction, research, faculty status, 
and those aspects of student life which relate to the 
educational process. 

"On these matters, the power of review or final 
decision lodged in the governing board or delegated 
by it to the president should be exercised adversely 
only in exceptional circumstances. . . . 

"The faculty sets the requirements for the degrees 
offered in course, determines when the requirements 
have been met, and authorizes the president and 
board to grant the degrees thus achieved. 

"Faculty status and related matters are primarily 
a faculty responsibility. This area includes appoint- 
ments, reappointments, decisions not to reappoint, 
promotions, the granting of tenure, and dismissal. 
. . . The governing board and president should, on 




questions of faculty status, as in other matters where 
the faculty has primary responsibility, concur with 
the faculty judgment except in rare instances and 
for compelling reasons which should be stated in 
detail. 

"The faculty should actively participate in the 
determination of policies and procedures governing 
salary increases. . . . 

"Agencies for faculty participation in the govern- 
ment of the college or university should be estab- 
lished at each level where faculty responsibility is 
present. ..." 

Few have quarreled with the underlying reason 
for such faculty autonomy: the protection of aca- 
demic freedom. But some thoughtful observers of the 
college and university scene think some way must be 
found to prevent an undesirable side effect: the 
perpetuation of comfortable ruts, in which individ- 
ual faculty members might prefer to preserve the 
status quo rather than approve changes that the 
welfare of their students, their institutions, and 
society might demand. 

The president of George Washington University, 
Lloyd H. Elliott, put it this way last fall: 

"Under the banner of academic freedom, [the 
individual professor's] authority for his own course 
has become an almost unchallenged right. He has 
been not only free to ignore suggestions for change, 
but licensed, it is assumed, to prevent any change 
he himself does not choose. 

"Even in departments where courses are sequen- 
tial, the individual profe'ssor chooses the degree to 



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Who's in Charge— III 

The Faculty 



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Who's in Charge —IV 

The Students 







which lie will accommodate his 
course to others in the sequence. 
The question then becomes: What 
restructuring is possible or desirable 
within the context of the professor's 
academic freedom?" 

NOTHER PHENOMENON has af- 

ected the faculty's role 
in governing the colleges 
and universities in recent 
years. Louis T. Benezet, president 
of the Claremont Graduate School 
and University Center, describes it 
thus: 

"Socially, the greatest change that 

has taken place on the American campus is the pro- 

essionalization of the faculty. . . . The pattern of 

acuity activity both inside and outside the institution 

has changed accordingly. 

"The original faculty corporation was the univer- 
sity. It is now quite unstable, composed of mobile 
professors whose employment depends on regional 
or national conditions in their field, rather than on 
an organic relationship to their institution and even 



less on the relationship to their administrative 
heads. . . . 

"With such powerful changes at work strengthen- 
ing the professor as a specialist, it has become more 
difficult to promote faculty responsibility for edu- 
cational policy." 

Said Columbia trustee William S. Paley: "It has 
been my own observation that faculties tend to as- 
sume the attitude that they are a detached ar- 
bitrating force between students on one hand and 
administrators on the other, with no immediate 
responsibility for the university as a whole." 

Yet in theory, at least, faculty members 
seem to favor the idea of taking a greater 
part in governing their colleges and 
universities. In the American Council on 
Education's survey of predictions for the 1970's, 
99 per cent of the faculty members who responded 
said such participation was "highly desirable" or 
"essential." Three out of four said it was "almost 
certain" or "very likely" to develop. (Eight out of 
ten administrators agreed that greater faculty par- 
ticipation was desirable, although they were con- 
siderably less optimistic about its coming about.) 

In another survey by the American Council on 
Education, Archie R. Dykes — now chancellor of the 
University of Tennessee at Martin — interviewed 
106 faculty members at a large midwestern univer- 
sity to get their views on helping to run the in- 
stitution. He found "a pervasive ambivalence in 
faculty attitudes toward participation in decision- 
making." 

Faculty members "indicated the faculty should 
have a strong, active, and influential role in de- 
cisions," but "revealed a strong reticence to give the 
time such a role would require," Mr. Dykes re- 
ported. "Asserting that faculty participation is es- 
sential, they placed participation at the bottom of 
the professional priority list and deprecated their 
colleagues who do participate." 

Kramer Rohfleisch, a history professor at San 
Diego State College, put it this way at a meeting of 
the American Association of State Colleges and 
Universities: "If we do shoulder this burden [of 
academic governance] to excess, just who will tend 
the academic store, do the teaching, and extend the 
range of human knowledge?" 

The report of a colloquium at Teachers College, 
New York, took a different view: "Future encoun- 
ters [on the campuses] may be even less likely of 



resolution than the present difficulties unless both 
faculty members and students soon gain widened 
perspectives on issues of university governance." 

Who's in charge? Today a new group 
has burst into the picture: the col- 
lege and university students them- 
selves. 
The issues arousing students have been numerous. 
Last academic year, a nationwide survey by Educa- 
tional Testing Service found, the Number 1 cause 
of student unrest was the war in Vietnam; it caused 
protests at 34 per cent of the 859 four-year colleges 
and universities studied. The second most frequent 
cause of unrest was dormitory regulations. This 
year, many of the most violent campus demonstra- 
tions have centered on civil rights. 

In many instances the stated issues were the real 
causes of student protest. In others they provided 
excuses to radical students whose aims were less the 
correction of specific ills or the reform of their col- 
leges and universities than the destruction of the 
political and social system as a whole. It is impor- 
tant to differentiate the two, and a look at the 
dramatis personae can be instructive in doing so. 

at the left — the "New Left," not to be con- 
/% fused with old-style liberalism — is Stu- 

/ ^ dents for a Democratic Society, whose 
-JL. Ml leaders often use the issue of university 
reform to mobilize support from their fellow students 
and to "radicalize" them. The major concern of 
sds is not with the colleges and universities per se, 
but with American society as a whole. 

"It is basically impossible to have an honest 
university in a dishonest society," said the chairman 
of sds at Columbia, Mark Rudd, in what was a fairly 
representative statement of the sds attitude. Last 
year's turmoil at Columbia, in his view, was im- 
mensely valuable as a way of educating students 
and the public to the "corrupt and exploitative" 
nature of U.S. society. 

"It's as if you had reformed Heidelberg in 1938," 
an sds member is likely to say, in explanation of his 
philosophy. "You would still have had Hitler's 
Germany outside the university walls." 

The sds was founded in 1962. Today it is a loosely 
organized group with some 35,000 members, on 
about 350 campuses. Nearly everyone who has 
studied the sds phenomenon agrees its members are 
highly idealistic and very bright. Their idealism has 






1 Student power'' has many meanings, as the young seek a role in college governance 







%: 



V 




Attached to a college (intellectually, 

led them to a disappointment with the society 
around them, and they have concluded it is corrupt. 

Most sds members disapprove of the Russian 
experience with socialism, but they seem to admire 
the Cuban brand. Recently, however, members re- 
turning from visits to Cuba have appeared disil- 
lusioned by repressive measures they have seen the 1 
government applying there. 

The meetings of sds — and, to a large extent, the 
activities of the national organization, generally — 
have an improvisational quality about them. This 
often carries over into the sds view of the future. 
"We can't explain what form the society will take 
after the revolution," a member will say. "We'll 
just have to wait and see how it develops." 

In recent months the sds outlook has become in-' 
creasingly bitter. Some observers, noting the escala- 
tion in militant rhetoric coming from sds head- 
quarters in Chicago, fear the radical movement soon 
may adopt a more-openly aggressive strategy. 

Still, it is doubtful that sds, in its present state of 
organization, would be capable of any sustained, 
concerted assault on the institutions of society. The 
organization is diffuse, and its members have a 
strong antipathy toward authority. They dislike 
carrying out orders, whatever the source. 

Far more influential in the long run, most 
observers believe, will be the U.S. National 
Student Association. In the current spectrum 
of student activism on the campuses, leaders 
of the nsa consider their members "moderates," not 
radicals. A former nsa president, Edward A. 
Schwartz, explains the difference: 

"The moderate student says, 'We'll go on strike, 
rather than burn the buildings down.' ' 

The nsa is the national organization of elected 
student governments on nearly 400 campuses. Its 
Washington office shows an increasing efficiency 
and militancy — a reflection, perhaps, of the fact that 
many college students take student government 
much more seriously, today, than in the past. 

The nsa talks of "student power" and works at it: 
more student participation in the decision-making 
at the country's colleges and universities. And it 
wants changes in the teaching process and the 
traditional curriculum. 

In pursuit of these goals, the nsa sends advisers 
around the country to help student governments 
with their battles. The advisers often urge the 
students to take their challenges to authority to the 



emotionally) and detached (physically), alumni can be a great and healthy force 



courts, and the nsa's central office maintains an 
! up-to-date file of precedent cases and judicial 
i decisions. 

A major aim of nsa this year is reform of the 
'academic process. With a $315,000 grant from the 
Ford Foundation, the association has established a 
center for educational reform, which encourages 
students to set up their own classes as alternative 
models, demonstrating to the colleges and univer- 
sities the kinds of learning that students consider 
worthwhile. 

The Ford grant, say nsa officials, will be used to 
"generate quiet revolutions instead of ugly ones" 
on college campuses. The nsa today is an organiza- 
tion that wants to reform society from within, 
rather than destroy it and then try to rebuild. 

Also in the picture are organizations of militant 
Negro students, such as the Congress for the Unity 
of Black Students, whose founding sessions at Shaw 
University last spring drew 78 delegates from 37 
colleges and universities. The congress is intended 
as a campus successor to the Student Nonviolent 
Coordinating Committee. It will push for courses on 
the history, culture, art, literature, and music of 
Negroes. Its founders urged students to pursue their 
goals without interfering with the orderly operation 
of their colleges or jeopardizing their own academic 
activities. (Some other organizations of black students 
are considerably more militant.) 

And, as a "constructive alternative to the disrup- 
tive approach," an organization called Associated 
Student Governments of the U.S.A. claims a mem- 
bership of 150 student governments and proclaims 
that it has "no political intent or purpose," only 
"the sharing of ideas about student government." 

These are some of the principal national groups. 
In addition, many others exist as purely local or- 
ganizations, concerned with only one campus or 
specific issues. 

Except for those whose aim is outright dis- 
ruption for disruption's sake, many such 
. student reformers are gaining a respectful 
I hearing from college and university ad- 
ministrators, faculty members, and trustees — even 
as the more radical militants are meeting greater 
resistance. And increasing numbers of institutions 
have devised, or are seeking, ways of making the 
students a part of the campus decision-making 
process. 

It isn't easy. "The problem of constructive student 



participation — participation that gets down to the 
'nitty-gritty' — is of course difficult," Dean C. Peter 
Magrath of the University of Nebraska's College of 
Arts and Sciences has written. "Students are birds 
of passage who usually lack the expertise and 
sophistication to function effectively on complex 
university affairs until their junior and senior years. 
Within a year or two they graduate, but the ad- 
ministration and faculty are left with the policies 
they helped devise. A student generation lasts for 
four years; colleges and universities are more 
permanent." 

Yale University's President Kingman Brewster, 
testifying before the National Commission on the 
Causes and Prevention of Violence, gave these four 
"prescriptions" for peaceful student involvement: 

► Free expression must be "absolutely guaran- 
teed, no matter how critical or demonstrative it 
may be." 

► Students must have an opportunity to take 
part in "the shaping and direction of the programs, 
activities, and regulations which affect them." 

► Channels of communication must be kept 
open. "The freedom of student expression must be 
matched by a willingness to listen seriously." 

► The student must be treated as an individual, 
with "considerable latitude to design his own 
program and way of life." 

With such guidelines, accompanied by positive 
action to give students a voice in the college and 
university affairs that concern them, many observers 
think a genuine solution to student unrest may be 
attainable. And many think the students' contribu- 
tion to college and university governance will be 
substantial, and that the nation's institutions of 
higher learning will be the better for it. 

"Personally," says Otis A. Singletary, vice-chan- 
cellor for academic affairs at the University of 
Texas, "my suspicion is that in university reform, 
the students are going to make a real impact on the 
improvement of undergraduate teaching." 

Says Morris B. Abram, president of Brandeis 
University: "Today's students are physically, emo- 
tionally, and educationally more mature than my 
generation at the same age. Moreover, they have 
become perceptive social critics of society. The re- 
formers among them far outnumber the disrupters. 
There is little reason to suppose that ... if given 
the opportunity, [they] will not infuse good judg- 
ment into decisions about the rules governing their 
lives in this community." 



























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Who's in Charge? 

Ideally, a Community 

As far as the academic community is concerned, 
**• Benjamin Franklin's remark about hanging to- 
gether or hanging separately has never been more 
apt. The desire for change is better expressed in 
common future-making than in disputing who is in 
and who is out — or how far. 



— John Caffrey, American Council on Educati 



on 



A college or university can be governed well only by a sense of its community 



Who's in charge? Trustees and ad- 
ministrators, faculty members and 
students. Any other answer — any 
authoritarian answer from one of 
the groups alone, any call from outside for more 
centralization of authority to restore "order" to 
the campuses — misses the point of the academic 
enterprise as it has developed in the United States. 

The concept of that enterprise echoes the European 
idea of a community of scholars — self-governing, 
self-determining — teachers and students sharing the 
goal of pursuing knowledge. But it adds an idea that 
from the outset was uniquely American: the belief 
that our colleges and universities must not be self- 
centered and ingrown, but must serve society. 

This idea accounts for putting the ultimate legal 
authority for our colleges and universities in the 
hands of the trustees or regents. They represent the 
view of the larger, outside interest in the institu- 
tions: the interest of churches, of governments, of the 
people. And, as a part of the college or university's 
government, they represent the institution to the 
public: defending it against attack, explaining its 
case to legislatures, corporations, labor unions, 
church groups, and millions of individual citizens. 

Each group in the campus community has its own 
interests, for which it speaks. Each has its own 
authority to govern itself, which it exercises. Each 
has an interest in the institution as a whole, which 
it expresses. Each, ideally, recognizes the interests of 
the others, as well as the common cause. 

That last, difficult requirement, of course, is 
where the process encounters the greatest risk of 
breakdown. 

"Almost any proposal for major innovation in the 
universities today runs head-on into the opposition 
of powerful vested interests," John W. Gardner has 
observed. "And the problem is compounded by the 
fact that all of us who have grown up in the aca- 
demic world are skilled in identifying our vested 
interests with the Good, the True, and the Beautiful, 
so that any attack on them is, by definition, 
subversive." 

In times of stress, the risk of a breakdown is 
especially great. Such times have enveloped us all, 
in recent years. The breakdowns have occurred, on 
some campuses — at times spectacularly. 

Whenever they happen, cries are heard for 
abolishing the system. Some demand that campus 
authority be gathered into the hands of a few, who 
would then tighten discipline and curb dissent. 



Others — at the other end of the spectrum — demand 
the destruction of the whole enterprise, without 
proposing any alternatives. 

If the colleges and universities survive these 
demands, it will be because reason again has taken 
hold. Men and women who would neither destroy 
the system nor prevent needed reforms in it are 
hard at work on nearly every campus in America, 
seeking ways to keep the concept of the academic 
community strong, innovative, and workable. 

The task is tough, demanding, and likely to con- 
tinue for years to come. "For many professors," 
said the president of Cornell University, James A. 
Perkins, at a convocation of alumni, "the time re- 
quired to regain a sense of campus community . . . 
demands painful choices." But wherever that sense ' 
has been lost or broken down, regaining it is 
essential. 

The alternatives are unacceptable. "If this com- 
munity forgets itself and its common stake and 
destiny," John Caffrey has written, "there are 
powers outside that community who will be only 
too glad to step in and manage for us." Chancellor 
Samuel B. Gould, of the State University of New 
York, put it in these words to a committee of the 
state legislature: 

"This tradition of internal governance . . . must — 
at all cost — be preserved. Any attempt, however 
well-intentioned, to ignore trustee authority or to 
undermine the university's own patterns of opera- 
tion, will vitiate the spirit of the institution and, in 
time, kill the very thing it seeks to preserve." 

Who's in charge there? The jigsaw 
puzzle, put together on the preced- 
ing page, shows the participants: 
trustees, administrators, professors, 
students, ex-students. But a piece is missing. It must j 
be supplied, if the answer to our question is to be 
accurate and complete. 

It is the American people themselves. By direct 
and indirect means, on both public and private 
colleges and universities, they exert an influence 
that few of them suspect. 

The people wield their greatest power through 
governments. For the present year, through the 50 
states, they have appropriated more than $5-billion 
in tax funds for college and university operating 
expenses alone. This is more than three times the 
$1.5-billion of only eight years ago. As an expression 
of the people's decision-making power in higher 



Simultaneously, much power is held by 'outsiders' usually unaware of their role 



education, nothing could be more eloquent. 

Through the federal government, the public's 
power to chart the course of our colleges and uni- 
versities has been demonstrated even more dramat- 
ically. How the federal government has spent 
money throughout U.S. higher education has 
changed the colleges and universities in a way that 
few could have visualized a quarter-century ago. 

Here is a hard look at what this influence has 
meant. It was written by Clark Kerr for the 
Brookings Institution's "Agenda for the Nation," 
presented to the Nixon administration: 

''Power is allocated with money," he wrote. 

"The day is largely past of the supremacy of the 
autocratic president, the all-powerful chairman of 
the board, the feared chairman of the state appro- 
priations committee, the financial patron saint, the 
all-wise foundation executive guiding higher educa- 
tion into new directions, the wealthy alumnus with 
his pet projects, the quiet but effective representa- 
tives of the special interests. This shift of power can 
be seen and felt on almost every campus. Twenty 
years of federal impact has been the decisive in- 
fluence in bringing it about. 

"Decisions are being made in more places, and 



more of these places are external to the campus." 
The process began with the land-grant movement 
of the nineteenth century, which enlisted higher 
education's resources in the industrial and asri- 
cultural growth of the nation. It reached explosive 
proportions in World War II, when the govern- 
ment went to the colleges and universities for 
desperately needed technology and research. After 
the war, spurred by the launching of Russia's 
Sputnik, federal support of activities on the campuses 
grew rapidly. 

Millions of dollars every year went 
to the campuses for research. Most of 
it was allocated to individual faculty 
members, and their power grew pro- 
portionately. So did their independence from the 
college or university that employed them. So did 
the importance of research in their lives. Clearly 
that was where the money and prestige lay; at 



Who's in Charge— V 

The Public 




5 




- 



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Illustrated by Jerry Dadds 




many research-heavy universities, large numbers of 
faculty members found that their teaching duties 
somehow seemed less important to them. Thus the 
distribution of federal funds had substantially 
changed many an institution of higher education. 

Washington gained a role in college and uni- 
versity decision-making in other ways, as well. 
Spending money on new buildings may have had no 
place in an institution's planning, one year; other 
expenditures may have seemed more urgent. But 
when the federal government offered large sums 
of money for construction, on condition that the 
institution match them from its own pocket, what 
board or president could turn the offer down? 

Not that the influence from Washington was 
sinister; considering the vast sums involved, the 
federal programs of aid to higher education have 
been remarkably free of taint. But the federal power 
to influence the direction of colleges and uni- 
versities was strong and, for most, irresistible. 

Church-related institutions, for example, found 
themselves re-examining — and often changing — 
their long-held insistence on total separation of 
church and state. A few held out against taking 
federal funds, but with every passing year they 
found it more difficult to do so. Without accepting 
them, a college found it hard to compete. 



T 



he power of the public to influence the 
campuses will continue. The Carnegie 
Commission on Higher Education, in 
its important assessment issued in Decem- 



ber, said that by 1976 federal support for the 
nation's colleges and universities must grow to 
$13-billion a year. 

"What the American nation now needs from 
higher education," said the Carnegie Commission, 
"can be summed up in two words: quality and 
equality." 

How far the colleges and universities will go in 
meeting these needs will depend not basically on 
those who govern the colleges internally, but on the 
public that, through the government, influences 
them from without. 

"The fundamental question is this," said the 
State University of New York's Chancellor Gould: 
"Do we believe deeply enough in the principle of 
an intellectually free and self-regulating university 
that we are willing to exercise the necessary caution 
which will permit the institution — with its faults — 
to survive and even flourish?" 

In answering that question, the alumni and 
alumnae have a crucial part to play. As former 
students, they know the importance of the higher 
educational process" as few others do. They under- 
stand why it is, and must be, controversial; why 
it does, and must, generate frictions; why it is, 
and must, be free. And as members of the public, 
they can be higher education's most informed and 
persuasive spokesmen. 

Who's in charge here? The answer is at once 
simple and infinitely complex. 

The trustees are. The faculty is. The students are. 
The president is. You are. 



The report on this and the preceding 15 
pages is the product of a cooperative en- 
deavor in which scores of schools, colleges, 
and universities are taking part. It was pre- 
pared under the direction of the group listed 
below, who form editorial projects for 
education, a non-profit organization associ- 
ated with the American Alumni Council. 



Naturally, in a report of such length and 
scope, not all statements necessarily reflect 
the views of all the persons involved, or of 
their institutions. Copyright © 1969 by Edi- 
torial Projects for Education, Inc. All rights 
reserved; no part may be reproduced without 
the express permission of the editors. Printed 
in U. S. A. 



WILLIAM S. ARMSTRONG 

Indiana University 

DENTON BEAL 

Carnegie-Mellon University 

DAVID A. BURR 

The University of Oklahoma 

MARALYN O. GILLESPIE 

Swarthmore College 

WARREN GOULD 

George Washington University 

CHARLES M. HELMKEN 

American Alumni Council 



GEORGE C. KELLER 

Columbia University 

JACK R. MAGUIRE 

The University of Texas 

JOHN I. MATTILL 

Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology 

KEN METZLER 

The University of Oregon 

RUSSELL OLIN 

The University of Colorado 

JOHN W. PATON 

1 1 'esleyan University 



ROBERT M. RHODES 

The University of Pennsylvania 

STANLEY SAPLIN 

New York University 

VERNE A. STADTMAN 

The Carnegie Commission on 
Higher Education 

FREDERIC A. STOTT 

Phillips Academy, Andover 

FRANK J. TATE 

The Ohio State University 

CHARLES E. WIDMAYER 

Dartmouth College 



DOROTHY F. WILLIAMS 

Simmons College 

RONALD A. WOLK 

Brown University 

ELIZABETH BOND WOOD 

Sweet Briar College 

CHESLEY WORTHINGTON 
CORBIN GWALTNEY 

Executive Editor 

JOHN A. CROWL 

Associate Editor 

WILLIAM A. MILLER, JR. 

Aianaging Editor 



Track Team 
Is Almost 
Undefeated 




Tom Snedeker '70, Norristown, Pa., clears the 
bar at 14'}" for a new S.U. pole vault record. 



Freshman Bob Ellis was so angry that he hurled 
the aluminum baton at the ground. It made a dull, 
clanking sound as it bounced off the track onto 
the infield. 

During a season in which there were few dis- 
appointments, that particular moment was unques- 
tionably the most frustrating. Despite Ellis's sizzl- 
ing 48.1 anchor leg, Susquehanna's mile relay team 
did not finish among the leaders and failed to score 
at the Middle Atlantic Conference championships. 

The mile relay was the final event of the MAC 
meet and was the Crusaders' last opportunity to 




The winning mile-relay team consists of Cal 
McCains 71, White Plains, N.Y.; Jeff Breed 71, 
Glens Falls, N.Y.: Mike Petron '71, Bogota, 
N.J.: and Bob Ellis '72, Piscataway, N.J. 



win any of the individual events. But Jeff Breed 
ran a slow opening leg and Mike Petron got boxed 
in as he started his quarter mile. By the time Ellis 
got the baton, Susquehanna was out of the running. 

S.U. still managed to score 28 points to take 
fourth place among 16 teams in the MAC College 
Division. Ahead of the Crusaders were Franklin & 
Marshall with 43, PMC Colleges with 36)2 and 
Ursinus with 35. 

"You couldn't expect to come from the bottom 
to the top in one year," another coach told Susque- 
hanna's Ron Thomas. 

Thomas nodded and consoled himself with the 
thought that all 16 of the athletes who had com- 
peted for Susquehanna had one or more years of 
eligibility remaining. Two were juniors. The re- 
mainder were freshmen and sophomores. 

But the Crusaders had set their sights on the 
MAC championship. It was a patent example of 
"rising expectations." The Thomas proteges thought 
at the beginning of the season that they would be a 
good team. They didn't realize how good until 
they defeated F & M and Ursinus, two of the MAC 
College Division's perennial track powers, in a hotly 
contested triangular meet at Lancaster. Susquehan- 
na went into the meet a decided underdog and came 
out of it with 63 points to Ursinus's 60 and F & M's 
58. 

In the triangular meet, Ellis outlegged Ursinus 
sprint star Bryant Heisinger in both the 100 and 220- 



SPRING 1969 



31 



yard dashes. But Heisinger, a junior, got his revenge 
when he defeated Ellis by an eyelash in both events 
at the MACs. Both were timed at 22.4 in the 220 
and some of the spectators thought Ellis had it, 
but the judges picked Heisinger. 

Before he bounced the baton off the track, 
Ellis also placed second to F & M senior Thurm 
Bullock by three inches in the long jump and anchor- 
ed S.U.'s 440 relay team to a second place finish, 
a stride behind PMC. Tom Snedeker, a slender 
junior usually referred to as "Twiggy," took second 
in the triple jump and third in the pole vault. 

A few days later, Susquehanna completed its 
dual and triangular meet schedule with an easy 
victory over Western Maryland, giving the Crusaders 
a 13-1 record for the season. It was by far the 
University's best showing in track since the sport 
was revived in 1960. 

The only loss was to Bucknell in a close meet 
before a large Alumni Day crowd. The alumni, how- 
ever, saw Ellis run a 20.9 to break Larry Erdman's 
old school record of 21.7 in the 220. On the same 
afternoon, Snedeker cleared 14-3 in the pole vault. 

As the victories piled up, a number of Uni- 
versity records were broken. Don Baker was timed 
at 15.1 in the 120 high hurdles. Jeff Karver ran 
the 880 in 1:57.7, and Don Owens hurled the dis- 
cus 142-9. All three were freshmen. 

Ellis long jump 22-2. Breed, a sophomore, 
chopped his own records to 52.0 in the 440 and 
55.9 in the 440 intermediate hurdles. Gary Macia, 
also a sophomore, hurled the javelin 191 feet. The 
440 relay team (Cal McCants, Breed, Petron and 





SUSQUEHANNA 


UNIVERSITY 








TRACK 


1969 






Individual 


Scoring 1 


minimum 15 points' 




1 


Bob Ellis 


138'/ 2 


9. Jim Heisler 


37 3; 4 


2 


Tom Snedeker 


101 


10. Gary Macia 


34 


3 


Jeff Breed 


88l/ 2 


1 1 . Greg Dye 


29 


4 


Mike Petron 


55 


12. Bob Clyde 


273/, 


5 


Don Owens 


51 


13. Paul Howanitz 


20 1/4 


6 


Don Baker 


47% 


14. Andy Sherwood 


19 


7 


Jeff Karver 


43 


15. John Millen 


16 


8 


Cal McCants 


391/4 


16. Jeff Roush 


I51/4 



Ellis took 19 individual first places and anchored relay 
teams taking 12 first places. 

Snedeker won 15 individual first places. 

Breed won 6 individual first places and ran with relay 
teams taking 10 first places. 



Ellis) was undefeated in dual and triangular meet 
competition and was clocked at 42.9. 

The records, incidentally, date back only to 
1 960. Although Susquehanna had track teams 
from the turn of the. century to the early 1940s, 
most of the records for those years are not available. 

At the close of the season, Thomas also entered 
some of the best Crusader athletes in an invita- 
tional meet at Penn State and in the eighth Atlantic 
Coast NCAA Regional championships for small 
colleges at Dickinson. 

By this time, however, most of the team mem- 
bers already were thinking of next year — of a re- 
match with Bucknell and another shot at the MAC 
title. 




Don Baker '72. North Caldwell, N.J., and Paul Howanitz '72, Kingston, Pa., come- 
in I and 2 ahead of Bucknell and Lycoming in the 120-yard high hurdles. 



32 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




'69ers pose for a class 
picture on Alumni Day. At 
extreme left is Jim Avers. 
Hollidaysburg, Pa., 
president, who presented 
the class gifts. 



MINUTES OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION MEETING 



Susquehanna University Alumni Association assembled on 
Saturdav. May 3. 1969 for its annual Alumni Weekend 
meeting, the first to be held in the dining room of the new 
Campus Center. The meeting was called to order by Presi- 
dent Marlyn Fetterolf '23 and the invocation was offered 
by the Rev. Dr. Joseph B. Flotten. Susquehanna chaplain. 
Following the luncheon. Buss Carr '52. director of alumni 
relations, introduced May Queen Marilyn Kausch and her 
court who presented emeriti alumni with roses and members 
of the 50th reunion class with roses and congratulatory 
mementos from President Weber. Harry Butts '48, Alumni 
Weekend chairman, assisted. Other reunion classes rec- 
ognized were 1924, 1929, 1934. 1939, 1944. 1949. 1954. 
1959 and 1964. 

The Class of 1969 was officially received into the 
Alumni Association by President Fetterolf. Jim Ayers, 
president of the class, announced the class gift — $5000 
to be invested into mutual funds for 25 years. The class 
will thus present its major gift to the University as it cele- 
brates its 25th reunion. In addition, the '69ers presented 
$1200 for a new scoreboard for Alumni Gym and $700 
for financing of improvements for WQSU-FM. the student 
radio station. The gifts were accepted by President Weber. 

The business session was opened with a motion by 
Dorothy Turner '36, secretary, that the minutes of the last 
general meeting be accepted as reproduced and distributed. 
The motion was passed. Marlyn Fetterolf reported a 
treasury balance of $145. The report was accepted. Com- 
mittee reports followed. 

Harry Butts thanked all who helped plan and make 
Alumni Weekend a success and extended a special word of 
thanks to the Alumni Office, the kitchen staff and the 
maintenance staff. Dr. Erie I. Shobert II '35, chairman 
of the Loyalty Fund Committee, reported that cash for 
the year has reached $48,000 with two months remaining. 



Ed Rogers '42, chairman of the Club Activities Committee, 
reported that 13 district clubs met this spring and one last 
fall. Several have scheduled meetings for the summer. 
Merle Beam '22, chairman of the Nominations Committee, 
presented the following slate of officers for the coming 
year: Ed Rogers '42, president: Erie Shobert '35, vice presi- 
dent; Harry Butts '48, vice president: Dorothy Turner '36, 
secretary: Chester Rowe '52, treasurer. Also, members-at- 
large of the Executive Board: Alfred Streamer '26, Robert 
Gabrenya '40, Marsh Bogar '51, Walter Henry '54, William 
ivahl '62. There being no further nominations, all candi- 
dates were declared elected. The following persons, all of 
whom are members of the S.U. faculty or staff, were 
presented for honorary membership in the Alumni Associa- 
tion: Fred W. Slack Jr.. Janet Vedder, James L. Boeringer. 
Robert L. Bradford. Nancy Allen Cairns, Thomas F. Mc- 
Grath, George C. Boone. Randolph P. Harrison, Charles J. 
Igoe, William Nibbling. Robert E. Nylund, Candace Rid- 
ington Herb. All were approved. William Davenport '53. 
chairman of the University Relations Committee, reported 
that this newest committee of the Executive Board is as- 
sisting to keep open the lines of communication between 
the school, the students and the alumni. 

Alumni Awards were then presented by Donald Wis 
singer '50 of the Awards Committee — Senior Man and 
Woman Most Typifying the Ideals of Susquehanna: Barry 
I.. Jackson of Morrisville, Pa. and Judith A. Wittosch of 
Rutherford, N.J.: For Achievement: Erie I. Shobert '35 of 
St. Marys. Pa.: For Service: W. Alfred Streamer '26 of 
State College, Pa. 

The luncheon meeting was closed with the singing ol 
the Alma Mater led by Barbara Ballard '69. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Dorothy Turner "36. Secretary 



SPRING 1969 



33 



SU Sports 



by RON BERKHEIMER 



Don Harnum, who had a 32-18 record as freshman coach 
for the past three years at the University of Delaware, 
is Susquehanna's new basketball coach. 

A 29-year-old father of three, he starred as a foot- 
ball end and basketball forward at the University of Maine. 
During his senior season (19611 Maine was the undefeated 
football champion of the Yankee Conference and Harnum 
was named to the second team of the conference all-star 
squad. 

He earned the B.S. in physical education at Maine 
(making the dean's list five semesters) and a master's 
degree in guidance in education at Delaware. 

Harnum replaces John Barr, who won 107 and lost 153 
in 12 seasons at Susquehanna. Barr also coached the Cru- 
sader golf teams for nine years and completed a 44-43 
record this season. He has taken a position as vice president 
of personnel for a securities underwriting firm in Harris- 
burg. 

The new Susquehanna coach said he hopes to build a 
winning attitude with his own enthusiasm, dedicated play- 
ers, and the interest which he believes can be developed 
among the students. 

"I don't think you need all-stars to win," he remarked, 
"but you do need players who are dedicated and aggressive." 

An advocate of "pressure" defenses, he thinks that 
"you can't stick to one defense today or someone will pick 
you apart. The players are too good and they're too well 
coached." 

"We'll probably use a variety of defenses to try to 
prevent other teams from playing their normal game," 
he continued. "If they like to start their offense from the 
pivot, we'll try to keep them from getting the ball to the 
pivotman. If they like to go to one of their forwards, 
we'll overload." 

He also said offenses should be built around the 
players on the team at any particular time and that he 
knows very little about the Susquehanna players. 

Harnum was born in Brewer, Me., and played football, 
basketball, baseball and golf at Brewer High. After he 
received his master's degree, he spent two years in the 
Army and was discharged as a first lieutenant. Stationed 
at Ft. Benning, Ga., he coached a battalion basketball 
team to the post championship and the post all-star team 
to the Third Army championship. 

During the past three years, he also was assistant 
football and freshman lacrosse coach at Delaware. He 
will be an instructor in physical education and help coach 
either the baseball or track team at Susquehanna. 



Optimism doesn't come easily after four consecutive 
losing seasons, but 1969 could be a big year for Susque- 
hanna's football team. Fifty-two players. 27 of whom are 
lettermen, took part in spring practice. Only three mem- 
bers of the '6X squad are graduating. 




Basketball Coach Harnum stops by to 
talk things over with President Weber. 



"I don't think anyone will beat us this year because of 
lack of hitting," an obviously pleased head coach Jim Hazlett 
said after the spring game. 

Two of the most pleasant surprises during the spring 
workouts were freshman quarterback Ernie Tyler and 
sophomore Irv Miller, a 6-6, 225-pound basketball forward 
taking his first crack at college football. Miller is mobile 
and aggressive. Despite his inexperience, he is expected 
to see a lot of action as an offensive tackle and defensive 
end. Tyler, who lettered on defense last fall, will make 
Ed Danner hustle to keep his job as offensive quarterback. 

Danner, guard Henry DePerro. and halfback Bill Guth 
were named tri-captains following a squad election. All 
three will be seniors in the fall. 

While the track team grabbed most of the spring 
headlines, the baseball, golf and tennis teams were strug- 
gling to stay around the .500 mark. 

Senior centerfielder Gary Gilbert batted over .500 
during much of the season and was selected as the 1969 
winner of the Blair Heaton Award. Given annually in 
memory of Heaton '42, a football and track star at Sus- 
quehanna, the award is based on scholarship, dedication 
to athletics, and conduct on the field. Gilbert's father, Rov 
B. Gilbert of Emmaus, Pa., is a cousin of Dr. Russell W. 
Gilbert, longtime S.U. professor of German. 

Under new coach Joe Naunchik, who stole 52 bases one 
year as a minor league outfielder in the Pittsburgh Pirates' 
chain, Susquehanna made daring base running an effective 
part of its offense. Despite Gilbert's torrid bat. the Cru- 
saders were not hitting well as a team. The infield consisted 
of three freshmen (first baseman Jed Lawrence, second base- 
man Ken Freeland and shortstop Glenn Downing) and 
a sophomore (third baseman Dave Stover), 

Sophomore Whitney Gay won the number one posi- 
tion on the golf team and senior Dean Ross again held the 
number one spot on the tennis team. 



34 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Susquehannans On Parade 



Idella M. Kretchman retired from 
teaching piano and her activity in 
the Pittsburgh Piano Teachers As- 
sociation. Her new address is Route 
1, Salisbury, Pa. 15558. 

'16 

Bess Fetterolj Keller was the sub- 
ject of a front-page feature in The 
Shoppers' Guide, published in Me- 
chanicsburg. Pa., covering extensive 
studies she has made during the past 
decade in tracing her maternal geneo- 
logy in the Fisher family. According 
to her research, going back to 17th 
century Germany, an ancestor. 
Johannes Sebastian Fisher, made his 
way from New York to Selinsgrove 
with Conrad Weiser in 1710 and was 
the original owner of the Isle of Que. 



'21 

Marie Romig Huntington was se- 
lected as the "Delaware Mother of the 
Year" for 1969. Active in the 
American Legion Auxiliary, she is 
also listed in Who's Who of American 
Women. Her husband is the Rev. 
Park W. Huntington '17. 

Paul Ritter is a candidate for the 
Humanities Hall of Fame of the Me- 
chanicsburg (Pa.) Area High School 
Alumni Association. 

'22 

The Rev. Dr. Alvin E. Teichart is 
retired and living at 1768 Barr Ave., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15205. 

'24 

Lottie Brosius Kepner is in the An- 
napolis Nursing Home. Bay Ridge 
Ave., Eastport. Annapolis, Md. 21403. 



Amelia Schell Schnure was honored 

upon retirement by her fellow teach- 
ers at Mifflinburg, Pa. 

'25 

The Rev. Robert J. Keeler retired 
as pastor of St. John's Lutheran 
Church, Bellefonte, and is living at 
924 Shady Lane, Bellefonte, Pa. 
16823. 

The Rev. Guy M. Litbold retired 
as pastor of St. Paul's Lutheran 
Church, Lynchburg, and lives at Box 
441. Lynchburg, Ohio 45142. 

W. Earl Thomas was honored upon 
his retirement by the teachers of Mif- 
flinburg, Pa. 

'26 

Oliver S. Swisher has been with 
Western Union for 40 years and 
plans to retire August 1. 




Above: Emeriti Alumni. Below: 50th and 45th Reunion Classes. 




SPRING 1969 



35 



Parke R. Wagner, retired professor 
of chemistry at Shenandoah College, 
Winchester. Va., taught special ed- 
ucation in the Lewisburg (Pa.) school 
system last year. His wife, Essex 
Botsford Wagner '28, was honored 
with dedication of the yearbook at 
Warren County H.S., Front Royal, 
Va. 

'29 

Dr. Harold N. Moldenke has given 
Susquehanna copies of a series of 
phytologia monographs he authored 
and recently had published. He is 
associate professor of natural sciences 
at Paterson (N.J.) State College. 

'33 

Attorney J. Donald Steele was re- 
elected secretary of the board of di- 
rectors of the Selinsgrove State School 
and Hospital. 

# 35 

Dr. Ralph C. Geigle. superintendent 
of schools in Reading, Pa., was ap- 
pointed by the American Association 
of School Administrators as one of 
25 educators on a study mission of 
the German school system. Com- 
mencing in April, the study is cover- 
ing universities as well as elementary 
and secondary schools. 

# 39 

Eleanor Saveri Wise is secretary- 
treasurer of Trio Togs Inc. and a 
substitute teacher in the Easton (Pa.) 
Area Schools. The busy mother of 
six children is also president of the 
New Theatre of Easton. board mem- 
ber of the Heart Association of Mid- 
Eastern Pa. and the American As- 
sociation of University Women, chair- 
man of the Inner-City Christian Day 
Camp, and coordinator for the So- 
ciety for Improvement of Negro 
Youth Activities. 

# 40 

The Rev. George R. Brosius, for- 
merly in Zambales, Philippines, has 
been appointed by the Division of 
Service to Military Personnel, Luth- 
eran Council in the U.S.A., to rep- 
resent all armed forces Lutherans in 
attempts to relate them to parishes, 
families and homes in the area where 
they are serving. Current address: 
c/o Mrs. Judith Barlow. 2100 Walden, 
Oxnard, Calif. 93030. 

The Rev. Dr. John G. Genscl and 
his wife, the former Audrey Dodge 



x'45, were guests at the White House 
on April 29 for the birthday dinner 
given by President and Mrs. Nixon 
in honor of Duke Ellington. On the 
previous day John brought several 
musicians to the S.U. campus for two 
jazz liturgy performances. 

/ lorence Landback Lalsha com- 
pleted her master's equivalency in 
English with credits earned at Buck- 
nell. Alaska Methodist, Syracuse and 
Bloomsburg. 

Dr. Hubert R. Pellman was named 
Alumnus of the Year for Eastern 
Mennonite College. Harrisonburg, 
Va. It was the third such award given 
in 5 1 years. 



'42 

Ray M. Fulmer was appointed co- 
ordinator of the Pennsylvania State 
Department of Public Instruction's 
Division of Highway and Aviation 
Education. 

Robert M. Workman resigned as 
director of elementary and junior high 
instrumental music in the Warrior 
Run School District. Turbotville. Pa., 
after 30 years of service. 

'43 

Attorney Pierce Allen Coryell was 
named president of the Snyder County 
Bar Association. 



SU vignette 




DR. MICHAEL L. RACHUNIS '32, 
eye, ear, nose and throat specialist 
of Roebling, N.J., is one of ten dis- 
tinguished Americans who received 
the Horatio Alger Award on May 14 
in New York City. Among this 
year's other awardees were California 
Governor Ronald Reagan and U.S. 
Supreme Court Justice Thurgood 
Marshall. The medals are given each 
year by the American Schools and 
Colleges Association as living proof 
of the opportunities in the American 
way of life. 

Of Lithuanian descent. Dr. 
Rachunis was unable to speak English when he entered grade school. He was 
forced to quit school at the end of the eighth grade because his father had 
developed "miner's asthma" or anthrosilicosis and his help was needed to sup- 
port the family of six boys. At 16 he began working in the coal mines, took 
a correspondence course in mining and then became the youngest man in 
Pennsylvania to be certified as a foreman. Persisting in his desire to learn, lie 
arranged to mine at night and study by day, entered high school at the age of 
21 and graduated with honors three years later. In another three years he 
graduated with honors from Susquehanna, all the while earning money in the 
mines during summers. 

He was greatly interested in the welfare of coal miners because his father 
and brother had lost their lives in the mines and another brother had been 
maimed. At the suggestion of a chance acquaintance — Pauline Vochesky, who 
later became his wife — he decided to become a doctor. Again, he had to 
support himself and his studies by mining. Graduating from Jefferson Medical 
College, he interned in Wilkes-Barre, practiced for a time in his hometown of 
Glen Lyon, and then moved on to New Jersey. After World War II he decided 
to specialize and did graduate work at Polyclinic Hospital. Columbia and New 
York Universities. Today a member of the American Medical Association and 
a Diplomate of the National Board of Examiners, he is the only president of 
Trenton General Hospital to have been reelected three times. 

Dr. Rachunis and his career reflect, indeed, the Horatio Alger spirit of 
achievement despite many obstacles. 



36 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 






I 

i 


■ 


w^w 3 tBtf^LJ 


J»» * 




JKa' 


L 


P 



Above: 40th and 35th. Below: 30th and 25th. 




x'44 

Lester L. Yarnell retired after more 
than 26 years with the Pennsylvania 
Railroad in Altoona, Pa., where he 
was active with the Boy Scouts, 
American Legion, and fraternal or- 
ganizations. He, Mrs. Yarnell and 
their three children now live in New 
Port Richey. Fla. and spend much 
of their time in their favorite activity, 
camping. 

'45 

The Rev. Celo V. Leitzel is now 
chairman of the Snyder County Board 
of Assistance. 

Harold R. Snyder has been appoint- 
ed assistant director of field services 
of the National Cystic Fibrosis Re- 
search Foundation. His major con- 
cern will be assisting the volunteer 
chapters to raise funds for Patient 
Services and Medical Research. 

'48 

Harry W. Butts was appointed dis- 
trict manager of marketing for the 
Burroughs Corp. located in Detroit, 
Mich. He was formerly manager of 
Burroughs Philadelphia, Central 



Branch. He, his wife, the former 
Virginia Doss, and their three girls 
move to Detroit this summer. 

'51 

The Rev. William J. Foster is now 
pastor of the Village United Pres- 
byterian Church, Prairie Village, 
Kans. He is serving as minister to 
Pre-Communicants in Christian Ed- 
ucation. He and his wife, the for- 
mer Frances Savidge '49, and their 
children live at 8900 W. 95th Terrace, 
Shawnee Mission, Kans. 66212. 

'52 

The Rev. Wayne E. Lupolt, pastor 
of St. Luke's Lutheran Church, Sun- 
bury, was elected dean of the Sun- 
bury District, Central Pennsylvania 
Synod of the LCA. 

Lt. Alfred G. Snyder is with the 
U.S. Navy and stationed in DaNang 
as supply officer to points in Vietnam. 

x'53 

Charles H. Roitsli was promoted 
to title officer by the Berks Title 
Insurancy Company of Reading, Pa. 
He and his wife reside at 505 Kutz 
Court, Whitfield, Pa. 19609. 



x'54 

Joanne L. Heinly. director of nurs- 
ing and head of the associate degree 
nursing program at William Rainey 
Harper Junior College. Mount Pro- 
spect, 111., graduates her first group 
of 33 nursing students this spring. 
She was head nurse at S.U. in 1956-59 
and attended former President Her- 
bert Hoover during one of his last ill- 
nesses. 

'55 

Kenneth F. Erdley has been select- 
ed to appear in the publication. Out- 
standing Young Men of America for 
1969. The award is presented for 
outstanding achievement by men of 
35 years of age or younger. He and 
his wife, the former Charlotte Sandt 
'56, and two children live in Glass- 
boro, N.J. 

Richard E. McCarly has been 
named Operations Accountant, Carpet 
Products, at the Armstrong Cork 
Company's headquarters in Lancaster, 
Pa. He has been with the company 
since 1955. His wife is the former 
Suzanne Beal '57. 



SPRING 1969 



37 



hc'55 

Dr. Malcolm E. Musser, former 
dean of students at Bucknell, was 
honored by the creation of a scholar- 
ship in his name by a family in Johns- 
town, N.Y. The scholarship carries 
an annual stipend of approximately 
$500 to be awarded to a student who 
is an outstanding golfer. 

'56 

Dr. Donald L. Hartman was pro- 
moted to major during recent cere- 
monies at Martin Army Hospital. Ft. 
Benning. Ga. A dermatologist at the 
hospital, he entered the Army in 1968. 

x'56 

Peggy Brady Wyllie has been re- 
elected president of the Metropolitan 
N.J. Alumni Association of Alpha 
Delta Pi Sorority. 

'57 

George R. Cowley was promoted 
to controller of the York (Pa.) 
Division. American Machine and 
Foundery Co. 



The Rev. James D. Koons, pastor 
of St. Paul's Lutheran Church of 
Coopersburg. Pa. and a former min- 
ister to the deaf, performed his first 
baptismal ceremony in sign language 
on March 30. The event was featured 
in a picture article in The Morning 
Call, Allentown, Pa. 

Arthur A. Zimmerman was decor- 
ated with the Order of Grand Com- 
mander of the Star of Africa by Presi- 
dent Tubman of Liberia for his val- 
uable contributions to the economic 
life of Liberia during five years as 
assistant controller of Bethlehem 
Steel's Lamco J.V. Operating Co. in 
that country. He has now returned 
to the U.S. as administrative assistant 
in the Raw Material Accounting De- 
partment. Art and his wife, the 
former Margaret Dalby '59, have four 
children. 

'58 

John H. Anthony received the 
doctor of education degree from 
Temple University and is serving as 
dean of faculty. College of DuPage, 
La Grange. 111. 60525. 



'59 

George H. Thies is a sales represen- 
tative for the Paper Division, Fred J. 
Mayer & Son Polyethlene Corp., 
Newark, N.J. He and his wife, the 
former Ar/ene Silher x'61 , are parents 
of two children. 

Dr. Gene Witiak has established his 
own veterinary practice and animal 
hospital. Address: Bath Pike. R.D.2, 
Bethlehem, Pa. 18017. 

x'59 

Janet Snyder Ness graduated from 
Elizabethtown College in February 
with a B.S. in business education and 
a 4.0 average. She is doing sub- 
stitute teaching and taking graduate 
work. 

'60 

Hermit R. Ritter, a partner with 
W. D. Fisher and Company, Selins- 
grove, has successfully passed the cer- 
tified public accountant examination. 
He. and his family live at 518 McClay 
Ave., Lewisburg, Pa. 17837. 




Above: 20th and 15th. Below: 10th and 5th. 




38 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



'61 

Dr. Ronald L. Anthony, after 
spending two years in Pakistan on a 
research program with the Institue of 
International Medicine, is now as- 
sistant professor of medicine. Univers- 
ity of Maryland School of Medicine. 
Baltimore, Md. 

The Rev. Elmer H. Eiclie has re- 
signed from the St. Peter parish in 
Nuremberg, Pa. to accept a call 
to St. John and St. James Lutheran 
Church in Leek Hill, Pa. 

x'61 

Virginia Letson Olszewski and her 
three children will accompany her 
husband to Brussels for a 3- to 4- 
year assignment with the E s s o 
Chemical Co. as financial adviser for 
its European affiliate. 

'63 

The Rev. Donald S. Cornelius will 
enter Yale University in September 
for graduate work. 

The Rev. Frederick I. Fisher has 
accepted a call to St. Peter's Lutheran 
Church, Pine Grove, Pa. He leaves 
Ebenezer Lutheran, New Tripoli, Pa. 

'64 

Capt. William E. Lindsay Jr. is 
now stationed at Upper Heyford RAF 
Station, England. He is an RF-4C 
Phantom Jet pilot of the U.S. Air 
Forces in Europe. His wife, the for- 
mer Sally Schnure '65. will join him 
this summer. 

Joseph A. Snyder Jr. is personnel 
director for the Department of Com- 
munity Affairs, Harrisburg, Pa. In 
September he plans to attend the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania to work for 
his master's degree in governmental 
administration. 

U.S. Navy Lt. Charles A. Adler Jr. 
has received the Silver Star Medal 
"for conspicuous gallantry and in- 
trepidity" in action in Vietnam as 
officer-in-charge of Patrol Craft Fast 
32 during a neutralization and paci- 
fication mission entitled Operation 
Sea Lords. His citation credits him 
with "exacting and courageous" di- 
rection of three successive river raids 
under enemy fire which "led to the 
killing of 40 Communist insurgents 
and contributed to the ultimate des- 
truction of 242 enemy logistics crafts 
and enemy structures." Sox and his 



wife, the former Sara Johnson of 
Jacksonville, Fla., now live in Phila- 
delphia where he has undergone aural 
rehabilitation and is currently As- 
sistant Special Services Officer of the 
Naval Base. 

'65 

Attorney Peter L. Malson is now an 
associate with Attorney Merrill Linn 
in Lewisburg, Pa. His wife is the 
former Marjorie Blair '63. 

'66 

Sue C. Davis is a social claims 
examiner with the Department of 
Health Education and Welfare, Social 
Security Administration. Baltimore, 
Md. 

R. Peter Johnson and his wife are 
with the Peace Corps in India. They 
were recently moved from a village 
to a city and are working in the 
Family Planning Clinic. Their ad- 
dress is American Peace Corps, Kal- 
ambagh Road, P.O. and District, 
Muzaffarpur, Bikar, India. 

Stephen D. Melching is a gunners 
mate on the U.S.S. Cheroaucan now 
in Charleston, S.C. His wife and son 
have joined him at Lot 37, Russel St., 
Mount Pleasant. S.C. 29464. 

Michael P. Ranch will be receiving 
his master's in business administration 
in August from the University of 
South Carolina. His wife, the former 
Dorothy Wiesman. is teaching Ger- 
man in the Columbia schools. 

'67 

Pfc. Bruce S. Brown has been as- 
signed to the Americal Division in 
Vietnam. Last stationed at Ft. Car- 
son, Colo., he is a medic in Head- 
quarters Company. 4th Battalion. 31st 
Infantry Brigade near Chu Lai. His 
wife, the former Janet McAfee, lives 
in Meadowbrook, Pa. 

Kenneth R. Sausman will become 
an instructor in mathematics at Ly- 
coming College in September. 

Diane Simmons Troutman is now 
a social worker for the Greystone 
Park (N.J.) State Hospital. She and 
her husband reside at 36 Boonton St., 
Dover, N.J. 07801. 

x'67 

David A. Williams graduated from 
Allentown College of St. Francis de 
Sales in May. He has been accepted 



for enrollment at the Episcopal The- 
ological Seminary. Cambridge. Mass. 

'68 

Donald W. Fasold has accepted a 
a new position as a sales representa- 
tive in the wholesale division of 
W i c k e s Corporation in Saginaw, 
Mich. His new address is 3971 South 
Washington Road, Saginaw. Mich. 
48601. 

D. Michael Faust is pursuing grad- 
uate work for teaching certification 
at Shippensburg (Pa.) State College. 

Brian A. Gross was promoted to 
Army Private E-2 upon completion of 
basic combat training at Ft. Dix, N.J. 

Michael W. Licit ty has been com- 
missioned a second lieutenant in the 
U.S. Air Force. He is now at Mather 
AFB, Calif, for navigator training. 

Thomas B. Meyer is doing sub- 
stitute teaching in the Harrisburg 
School District while taking additional 
studies. 

R. Kumbe Sadler enlisted in the U. 
S. Air Force for four years and is 
being trained in the medical field. 
Address: AF68071847, CMR No 6 SQ 
3707 Fit 201, Lackland AFB, Tex. 
78236. 

Airman Ernest M. Staujfer has 
completed training as an air passenger 
specialist and graduated from the U.S. 
Air Force technical school, Sheppard 
AFB. Tex. He is assigned to a unit 
of the Military Airlift Command at 
Dover AFB. Del. 

x'68 

Kenneth P. Schuler is a senior at 
Nyack (N.Y.) Missionary College, 
majoring in English. He also is as- 
sistant varsity basketball and baseball 
coach, jayvee basketball and head 
cross country coach, and in charge of 
all intramural sports. Ken intends to 
work toward a master's degree and 
upon graduation expects to teach and 
coach. 

John Whetstone is a computer 
programmer for IBM in Mechanics- 
burg, Pa. He, his wife and son live 
at 5021 Trindle Rd., Mechanicsburg, 
Pa. 1705?. 

x'69 

Tradesman Second Class John C. 
Wagner was advanced to his present 
rank at Newport, R.I. He successfully 
competed in Navy-wide examinations 
in February to earn the promotion. 



SPRING 1969 



39 



"J DO" 



BOUKER- NIXON 
Cynthia Claire Nixon '67 to Jon 
Stenman Bouke r '69, January 27, 
1968. Jon is a sales representative for 
Humble Oil in Harrisburg and Cyn- 
thia was a caseworker for the Snyder 
County Board of Assistance, Selins- 
grove. Address: 5010 Trent Rd., 
Harrisburg. Pa. 17105. 

FINKELSTEIN - GUINN 
Jane Kistner Guinn '60 to Melvyn 
Finkelstein '60, June 22. 1968, Pine 
Street Lutheran Church, Danville. 
Pa. Mel is a C.P.A. for Aetna Life 
and Casualty. Harrisburg. The couple 
resides at 4710 Delbrook Rd.. 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 17055. 

PALMER - ROSENGARTEN 
Nancy Hall Rosengarten x'68 to 
Ralph C. Palmer. Address: 625 
Hickam Drive, Loring AFB, Me. 
04750. 

WILLIAMS -HALL 

Jane E. Hall x'68 to Byron L. 
Williams Jr., August 24, 1968, Wash- 
ington Cathedral. Washington, D.C. 
Mr. Williams is studying at the Uni- 
versity of Utah and is a management 
trainee of the Murry B. Marsh Co. 
Jane is with the Unit Control Di- 
vision of Averbachs, Salt Lake City. 
Mailing address: 6021 Rossmore Dr.. 
Bethesda. Md. 20014. 

CLARK. - ZIEGLER 
Audrey Elizabeth Ziegler '65 to 
Howard M. Clark, January 18, 1969, 
Carmel Presbyterian Church, Glen- 
side. Pa. Nancy Sturgis (Mowery) 
x'65 served as maid of honor. Mr. 
Clark is administrative assistant, term- 
inal operations, National Molasses 
Co., Willow Grove, Pa. and Audrey 
is exceutive secretary to the executive 
vice president. National Molasses Co. 
The couple is living at Sycamore 
Gardens Apts., Apt. D-3, 2424 N. 
E a s t o n Road. Willow Grove, Pa. 
19090. 

MOWERY - STURGIS 
Nancy Sturgis x'65 to the Rev. 
Richard A. Mowery, January 1969. 
Pastor Mowery is associate pastor of 
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Ab- 
ington. Address of the couple: 1721 
Ferndale Ave.. Abington, Pa. 19001. 



HERRINGTON - EVANS 
Wendy Linnea Evans '69 to Henry 
Herbert Herrington '68, February 1, 
1969, Abington Baptist Church, Ab- 
ington, Pa. S.U. members of the wed- 
ding party were Carol Riley '69, 
Karen Fox '69, Philomena Quattroc- 
chi '69, Robert Ray '69, John Morris- 
sey '70, Terry Kent '69, and Mike 
Faust '68. Hank is with Ernst & 
Ernst, accountants, in Philadelphia, 
and is also a private in the U.S. 
Army Reserves. Wendy will teach 9th 
and 10th grade English at Upper 
Moreland Senior H.S., Willow Grove. 
Pa., beginning in September. The 



couple resides at Sherry Lake Apts.. 
45 Newport House. Conshohocken. 
Pa. 19428. 

SCHILPP - McCRACKEN 

Margaret Helen McCracken '69 to 
AIC Robert William Schilpp x'68, 
March 8, 1969, Bethany Lutheran 
Church, Montoursville, Pa. Bob is 
with the U.S. Air Force stationed at 
Vandenberg AFB, Calif. Address: 
525-B North "S" St., Lompoc, Calif. 
93436. 

SMITH - FLOHR 

Georgia L. Flohr to David A. Smith 
'63, March 8, 1969. Charles Leathery 





CRUSRDER SCOREBOARD 








SPRING 


1969 








TRACK 






GOLF 




su 




Opp 


su 




Opp 


81 


Delaware Valley 


64 


5" 


Scranton 


13 


98 


Hartwick 


47 


5 


Upsala 


13 


63 


Ursinus 


60 


3'/2 


Wilkes 


14 >/2 


63 


Franklin & Marsh 


all 58 


14 '/2 


Juniata 


3'/2 


1 19 


Wagner 


26 


916 


Lycoming 


8V2 


90 


Dickinson 


59 


10 


Delaware Valley 


8 


90 


Juniata 


31 


7 


Bloomsburg 


1 1 


73 


Gettysburg 


71 


1 '2 


Franklin & Marshall 


16 


73 


Juniata 


37 


3 


Bucknell 


15 


73 


Bucknell 


85 


10 


Gettysburg 


8 


73 


Lycoming 


23 


7 


Elizabethtown 


1 1 


88 


Kutztown 


75 


3 ' 2 


King's 


14V 2 


88 
102 


Upsala 
Western Maryland 
Won 13 Lost 1 


18 
43 


1 


Won 4 Lost 8 

TENNIS 

Hartwick 


8 




BASEBALL 




5 


Albright 


4 


2 


Wagner 


1 1 


1 


Juniata 


8 


4 


Hartwick 


2 


2 


Bloomsburg 


7 


3 


Hartwick 


12 





Bucknell 


9 


7 


Juniata 


2 


6 


Wilkes 


3 


4 


Philadelphia Textile 


7 


8 1/2 


King's 


Vi 


3 


Messiah 


1 


7 


Scranton 


2 


4 


Messiah 





6'/2 


Elizabethtown 


2'/2 


2 


Bucknell 


9 


3 


Lycoming 


6 


4 


Elizabethtown 


5 


1 


Dickinson 


8 


9 


Dickinson 


1 


8 


Delaware Valley 


1 


6 


Dickinson 


14 




Won 6 Lost 6 




2 


King's 


9 








7 
2 


Juniata 
Upsala 


3 
4 




WOMEN'S TENNIS 




1 


Upsala 


5 





Elizabethtown 


7 





Scranton 


2 





Shippensburg 


7 





Scranton 


1 


2 


Millersville 


5 





Wilkes 


7 


4 


Bucknell 


3 


3 


Lycoming 
Won 6 Lost 13 


4 


2 


Lock Haven 
Won 1 Lost 4 


5 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



'63 served as best man and Ken 
Mutzel '64 was one of the ushers. 
Dave and his wife, who has an A.A. 
degree from Goldey Beacom School 
of Business, are both with Allis- 
Chalmers Manufacturing Co. in York. 
The couple resides at 220 S. Adam 
St., York. Pa. 17404. 

MELENDEZ - ESTEP 
Laura J. Estep '66 to John Mel- 
endez, March 20. 1969, City Hall. 
New York City. Mr. Melendez is a 
sculptor and Laura is assistant editor 
of children's books for Lothrop. Lee 
and Shepard Co. The couple lives at 
Apt. 4-C. 118 W. Third St.. Green- 
wich Village, New York, N.Y. 10012. 

SPOTTS - BARR 
Beverly Barr to Richard D. Spoils 
'68, March 22. 1969. St. Paul's 
Lutheran Church. Doylestown. Pa. 
Douglas Spotts '63 served as best man 
for his brother and Jack Griffiths '68 
was an usher. Richard is with Peat. 
Marwick & Mitchell, Philadelphia, in 
the audit department and his wife is 
in the sales division of Merck Sharp 
& Dohme, West Point, Pa. The 
couple resides in the Valley Stream 
Apts. H-103, Route 463 and Line St.. 
Lansdale, Pa. 19446. 

ROMBERGER - McELHANEY 
Norma Kay McElhaney x'70 to 
Charles John Romberger '68, spring 
1969, Trinity Lutheran Church. 
Chambersburg, Pa. Wayne Gill '69, 
an intern pastor, assisted at the cere- 
mony. Emily Lee '70 was maid of 
honor: Jane Bitting '71. Carol Crane 
'70, Linda Grill '69, Alice Moore '70 
and K a t h r y n Reichard '69 were 
among the bridesmaids. Ushers in- 
cluded Calvin McCants Jr. '71, Rich- 
ard Michael '68, John Stankiewicz 
'67, and Dennis Sullivan '68. Charles 
is an engineer for Homer Laboratories 
of Bethlehem Steel Corp.. and Norma 
plans to continue her studies at an- 
other college. Address: R.D. 1, 
Riegelsville. Pa. 18077. 



Born Crusaders 



To James L. '58 and Patricia Sipc 
Seasholtz '56. a daughter, Barbara 
Ann, by adoption, one year old Feb- 
ruary 1969. 324 Pinehurst Rd., York. 
Pa. 17402. 



To Warren M. and Elaine Williams 
Burner '49, a daughter. Lauren Elaine. 
May 31. 1968. 88 Monroe Place. 
Bloomfield. N.J. 07003. 

To George R. and Dorothy Wooley 
Baron '65. a son. Robert Bartlett. 
June 13. 1968. 22 Loring Court, 
Yalesville, Conn. 06492. 

To Gary L. and Ann Neta Rics- 
meyer Danner '63. a daughter. Kath- 
erine Elizabeth. June 18. 1968. 5162 
Dogwood Trail. Lyndhurst. Ohio 
44124. 

To Dean Scott '69 and Janet Sch- 
maltz Ross '68, a son, Scott Douglas. 
October 19. 1968. 351 S. Market St.. 
Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870. 

To the Rev. Lester E. '59 and 
Cleone Hohman Rudisill x'60, their 
fourth child, a daughter. Heather 
Gae. January 8, 1969. Les is pastor 
of the Bergstrasse Lutheran Church. 
Ephrata. R.D. 3. Ephrata. Pa. 17522. 

To Gary N. '68 and Janet Purvis 
Stiegler x'67. a son. Brian Nelson, 
February 3. 1969. Brian's sister 
Cherry is two years old. Gary is a 
construction and industrial products 
salesman with Republic Steel Corp.. 
Manufacturing Division, Boston. 
Mass. 8359 Maple Ave.. Pennsauken, 
N.J. 08110. 

To William H. x'69 and Judith Ann 
Coman Thode '68, a daughter, Ann 
Elizabeth, February 15. 1969. Bill, 
in the Navy, is a boilerman 3rd class 
aboard the U. S. S. Tidewater in 
Naples. Italy. Box 312. Phoenix. Md. 
21131. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Rohert Baucis 
'58, their first child, a son. Chris- 
topher. February 21. 1969. Bob is 
now curriculum associate for foreign 
languages. Grades 7 through 12. for 
the Council Rock School District. 
Bucks County. State St.. Newtown. 
Pa. 18940. 

To Paul J. '69 and Susan Fegely 
Hampel '67. their second child, a son. 
Benjamin Paul. February 25. 1969. 
Paul is completing his senior year at 
S.U. 301 E. Walnut St.. Selinsgrove. 
Pa. 17870. 

To Sally and R. Douglas Kile '66. 
their second daughter. Beth Allison. 
March 13. 1969. Doug is a personnel 
staff assistant with International Busi- 
ness Machines Corp. 207 Sliter Place. 
Endicott. N.Y. 13760. 

To Gail and Michael E. Rupprecht 
'64. their second child, a daughter. 
Ann Meredith, March 20. 1969. 1322 



Prospect Mill Rd., Bel Air. Md. 
21014. 

To Costa N. and Janet Fritsch 
Miller x'64. a daughter. Jill Ann, 
Father is a Michigan State graduate 
now completing his master's in guid- 
ance and counseling at West Chester 
State, and is executive director of 
Handi-Crafters Inc.. Thorndale, Pa., 
a non-profit corporation for training 
of the mentally and physically handi- 
capped. Janet taught business educa- 
tion for two years at Chester H.S. 
742 E. 25th St., Chester. Pa. 19013. 

To Paul R. and Lorraine Acker 
Brosious '67, their first child, a daugh- 
ter, Lisa Kay, April 1969. Mr. Bro- 
sious is studying for the Ph.D. in 
physics at the University of New York 
at Albany. Leisureville Apts.. Water- 
vliet. N.Y. 12189. 

To Paul D. '59 and Thiry Reamer 
Olhrich '57, their second son. Eric 
Paul. April 2. 1969. Paul is assistant 
to the personnel director. Fisher 
Electronics. Milroy. Pa. 727 High- 
land Ave., Lewistown, Pa. 17044 

To Norman A. '62 and Annette 
Campbell Crickenberger '64, their 
second child, a daughter, Laur'l Ann, 
April 25, 1969. 33 Fireplace Lane, 
Hicksville, N.Y. 11801. 



deaths 



Albert R. Heap Jr. x'42. Decatur, 
Ga. and Ocean City. N.J.. December 
16. 1967. 

Harry Doll '31. Eggertsville. N.Y., 
1968. He taught school and later 
was a principal. 

Ralph W. E. Kline '15. Collings- 
wood, N.J., 1968. A retired school 
teacher, he had taught in rural Penn- 
sylvania and Laurel. Del. before join- 
ing the mathematics faculty of Col- 
lingswood H.S. in 1922 and becom- 
ing head of the department three 
years later. He also worked with the 
Boy Scouts of America and served 
a number of summers as assistant 
camp director of the Queens Council 
(Jamacia, N.Y.) Summer Camp at 
Camp Man. Ten Mile River, N.Y. 

Clara R u p p e I Bingaman '08, 
Quincy, 111., 1968. Mrs. Bingaman 
was the widow of the Rev. Dr. /. W. 
Bingaman '06. 

C. Mildred Gemberling. Selins- 
grove, Pa., November 20, 1968. She 



SPRING 1969 



41 



was a life member of the Women's 
Auxiliary of Susquehanna University 
and served as treasurer for 12 years. 
She also was employed in the snack 
bar for a number of years. Among 
her survivors are sister Laura L. '28, 
brother-in-law Clair C. Coleman .x'30, 
and nephew Donald '60. 

Dr. Nicholas L. Ricciardi '29, Hart- 
ford. Conn.. October 23. 1968. He 
earned the D.D.S. from Loyola Uni- 
versity School of Dentistry in 1940 
and practiced dentistry until his death. 
Mrs. Ricciardi, acting on her hus- 
band's wishes, has returned his Sus- 
quehanna books to the University. 
They will likely be placed in the 
archives department of the library. 

Janet Elaine Brandes '56, Allen- 
town. Pa.. November 29. 1968. She 
earned the M.S. in library science at 
Drexel Institute of Technology, was a 
library assistant at the Allentown 
(Pa.) Free Library and later a cata- 
loger for the Lippincott Library of 
the University of Pennsylvania. Miss 
Brandes was a member of the Uni- 
tarian Church, Y W C A and Junto 
Adult School classes. 

Horace Christman x'09, Selinsgrove, 
Pa., November 29, 1968. A football 
player while in college, he played 
against the famed Jim Thorpe of the 
Carlisle School for Indians. Mr. 
Christman operated a cigar store and 
pool room in Kingston. Pa. until re- 
tiring in 1955. He was a Lutheran 
and a member of Elks Lodge 109 of 
Wilkes-Barre and Odd Fellows Lodge 
709 of Kingston. The Rev. Dr. Lester 
G. Shannon '15, officiated at the 
services. 

Ralph M. Kendall, Anna Maria, 
Fla., and Sunbury, Pa.. December 5, 
1968. He was the husband of the late 
Lyla Kimble Kendall '29. 

Ruth Simonson F 1 o 1 1 e n , Selins- 
grove, Pa., December 15, 1968. Wife 
of Susquehanna Chaplain Joseph B. 
Flotten, she attended Notre Dame 
Academy and New York University, 
was a member of Trinity Lutheran 
Church and a past president of Sus- 
quehanna's Women's Auxiliary. 

Dr. Calvin V. Erdly '20, Hollidays- 
burg, Pa., January 5, 1969. An edu- 
cator for more than 30 years, he was 
former superintendent of the Lewis- 
town, Hanover and Hollidaysburg 
schools, and supervising principal in 
the Phillipsburg (Pa.) School District. 
He earned the M.S. from Pennsyl- 
vania State College and was conferred 



with Susquehanna's honorary doctor 
of pedagogy in 1943. Among his 
writings, he developed an administra- 
tive and supervisory handbook that 
is being used in many districts in 
Pennsylvania. Upon his retirement, 
he spent several years as an educa- 
tional consultant for the architectural 
firm of Hunter, Campbell and Rea of 
Altoona. He enlisted in the U. S. 
Army Ambulance Service with the 
S.U. contingent during World War I, 
served overseas with that group and 
was decorated by the French with the 
Croix de Guerre for distinguished 
service in the field. Dr. Erdly was a 
member of numerous professional, 
fraternal and civic organizations. He 
also served as president of the Alumni 
Association of S.U. and was chair- 
man of the Association's project com- 
mittee to raise funds to build an ad- 
dition to the library. Among his sur- 
vivors are a sister, Edith Erdly Ram- 
sey '30, married to Frank E. Ramsey 
'30. 

The Rev. W. Z. Artz, Elizabeth- 
ville. Pa., January 2, 1969. Pastor 
emeritus of the Sale m Lutheran 
Church, Elizabethville, he was the 
father of Dorothy E. Artz '41 . 

Mrs. William M. Schnure, Selins- 
grove, Pa., January 21, 1969. A mem- 
ber of the S.U. Women's Auxiliary, 
she was the wife of William M. x'99. 
Other survivors include daughter Jane 
'47, a son Howard H., and grand- 
children Sara Schnure Lindsay '65, 
wife of Capt. William E. Lindsay 
Jr. '64 and Sp/4 James P. Schnure 
x'69. 

Maude Shannon Ramer, Drexel 
Hill, Pa.. February 2, 1969. Mrs. 
Ramer was Summer Session precep- 
tress at Seibert Hall in the mid-'20s. 
She and her late husband. Hair y 
Webster Ramer '22, worked for a 
time with the late Dr. Luther D. 
Grossman '16 in supervising Tressler 
Orphan's Home in Loysville, Pa. Son 
George H. Ramer, a Marine Corps 
lieutenant, was awarded a posthu- 
mous Congressional Medal of Honor 
after being killed on Korea's Heart- 
break Ridge. A daughter, Ethel Ram- 
er Coulter '38, survives. 

The Rev. Mervyn J. Ross '09, 
Friedens, Pa., February 5, 1969. He 
was a Lutheran pastor for 57 years 
and served the Friends Cove Charge, 
Bedford County, Pa. for 31 years. 
Among his many activities, he held 
several important offices including 



the presidency of both the Juniata 
and Allegheny Lutheran Conferences. 
Pastor Ross was well known and 
loved by young people in his capacity 
as head of nature studies for a number 
of years at Camp Sequanota near 
Jennerstown. 

David Dunmire '21, Indiana, Pa., 
July 6, 1968. He also attended the 
Susquehanna Academy and earned the 
M.Ed, degree from the University of 
Pittsburgh. A teacher for more than 
40 years, he was a member of the 
high school faculty at Indiana from 
1929 until his retirement in 1963. 

J. Smith Coldren '32, West Browns- 
ville, Pa., suddenly on September 18, 
1968 while playing tennis. 

Luther F. Kepler '21, Reedsville, 
Pa., January 6, 1969. 

/. Burner Rine '07, Winter Haven, 
Fla., January 29. 1969. 

Margaret Sultzbaugh Rogers '56, 
Fullerton, Calif., February 18, 1969, 
in an automobile accident. For the 
past eight years she had been an 
ele-mentary teacher in the Raymond 
Elementary School. Fullerton. She 
was buried in Berrysburg. Pa. 

The Rev. A. Ellsworth Grove '25, 
Mifflinburg, Pa., February 20, 1969. 
Pastor Grove received the B.D. de- 
gree from the Lutheran Seminary at 
Philadelphia in 1928 and served par- 
ishes at Nuremberg and Sellersville, 
Pa. Since retirement in 1962, he was 
a supply pastor. A veteran of World 
War I, he held membership in several 
veteran's organizations and Masonic 
orders. Union County Historical So- 
ciety, and Mifflinburg Kiwanis. A 
son, A brain E. Ill x'61, is among his 
survivors. 

The Rev. James H. Goss '21, Lees- 
burg. Fla., February 21. 1969. He 
also earned the B.D. and M.A. degrees 
at Susquehanna. Pastor Goss served 
congregations in Pennsylvania, New 
York, Oregon and British Columbia, 
and was at Glory Dei Lutheran 
Church, Leesburg, at the time of his 
death. An A r m y chaplain during 
World War II, he served in prisoner 
of war camps in the European 
Theatre and attained the rank of 
Major. He was an ardent volunteer 
in the interests of his Alma Mater, 
particularly during his pastorate in 
Lewistown. 

Mrs. Anna M. Humphrey of Holli- 
daysburg, Pa.. February 28, 1969. 
Mrs. Humphrey was a guest at the 
Allegheny Lutheran Home and a 



42 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Carr's Column 



by BUSS CARR '52 



Alumni Weekend 1969 . . . 

Sunny skies, mild temperatures, continuous activity, 
1000 alumni — put them all together and they added up to 
the happiest, most successful Alumni Weekend ever. The 
reunion classes returned in full force along with many, 
many others — from as far away as the states of Washing- 
ton. Alabama and Florida. Some 515 were at the Awards 
Luncheon in the air-conditioned dining room of the Cam- 
pus Center. 175 were at the dinner dance. 400 were in 
attendance at the Worship Service, more than 100 were 
at the summer home of Jeanne and Jack Shipe '40 for 
Friday night's get-together. 28 golfers entered our tourna- 
ment — won by Mina Sarba Norwood '50 and Norman 
Lauer '62. And this year there were nearly as many alumni 
from the '60s as from any other decade. Congratulations 
to all the chairmen and thanks to all who were part of a 
really great weekend. 

District Club Meetings . . . 

If you read the minutes of our business meeting, you 
may have noted that there were 13 district meetings this 
spring and 650 attended them. That's about 10 percent of 
our alumni. Not a bad record, but where were the other 
60 percent who live in those district areas? Big things 
will be happening at Susquehanna over the next ten years 
and alumni will be part of them. Let's get with our dis- 
trict clubs, take advantage of the activities, and make our 
Association a strong body the University can turn to at 
any time. 

Presidents . . . 

The S.U. Alumni Association is truly fortunate to 
have had capable leadership across the years. Marlyn 



Fetterolf '23. our immediate past president, was never too 
busy to do anything asked of him, and more. Alumni are 
sincerely grateful for all his efforts and know that he and 
his wife, Mabel Kinzey Fetterolf '24, will continue to be 
an inspiration to all graduates, young and old alike. 

Our new president is Ed Rogers '42 and we may be 
sure that he will carry on where Marlyn left off. Again, 
this office becomes a kind of family affair — Ed's wife is 
the former Blanche Forney '42 and their daughter Ellen 
graduated with the Class of 1968. We're in good hands! 

Award Winners . . . 

Erie Shobert '35 won the Achievement medal and Al 
Streamer '!'■> won the Service medal. Perhaps it could 
have gone either way, for both of these men have been 
successful in their private live.- and have also been leaders 
and workers for their Alma Mater. Their impact has been 
great, and will surely continue. On behalf of all alumni, 
congratulations to them, and to Barry Jackson and Judy 
Wittosch, the two Senior medal winners. 

Do you know of someone who should be nominated 
for an Alumni Award? Don't keep it a secret — send us his 
or her name along with as much background as possible 
and we'll forward it to the proper committee post haste. 

Class of 1969 . . . 

From all of us to all of you, congratulations for suc- 
cessfully completing your degree, and we wish you much 
fulfillment in your life's work. We hope you enjoy read- 
ing about Susquehanna in the Alumnus, and that you'll 
keep us well informed. The more informed we are, the 
better service we can offer you. Good luck! 



member of Zion Lutheran Church in 
Hollisdayburg. A graduate of the 
Rochester Institute of Technology, 
she was dietitian at Susquehanna 
University for 27 years prior to her 
retirement in 1958. 

George T. Bowen '29, Dallas, Pa., 
March 1969. 

George S. Schoch '00, Selinsgrove, 
Pa., April 7, 1969. An early auto 
fancier, he operated the first garage 
in Selinsgrove and was active in or- 
ganizing and driving in auto tours. 
He was associated with the First Na- 
tional Bank of Selinsgrove for 25 
years, retiring in 1943, and was 
trainer for S.U. athletes in the days 
of the Staggs. For several years he 
coached the Crusader track team. 
He was a member of First Lutheran 
Church, Theta Chapter of Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon, and the Snyder Coun- 
ty Historical Society. Among his 



survivors are a son, David E. x'56; 
and sisters Pauline R. x'09; Dorothy 
Ac' 14. wife of Dr. R. B. Rearick '21: 
Christine '19, widow of George W. 
Classier '20; Lama '20, wife of Dr. 
James B. Horton '20. The Rev. Celo 
V. Leitzel '45 officiated at funeral 
services and the pallbearers were 
Robert M. Bastress '39, James Haz- 
lett '52, Robert Pitlello '51. and 
Ronald Berkheimer hon'68. 

Martha Teats Helwig (Mrs. Charles 
E.).v. Selinsgrove, Pa., April 10, 1969. 
Widowed in 1957, she taught school 
in Chapman Township. Pa. and later 
worked at the Selinsgrove State 
School and Hospital, retiring in 
1966. She was a member of First 
Lutheran Church and the S.U. Wom- 
en's Auxiliary. The Rev. Celo V. 
Leitzel '45 was in charge of the ser- 
vices. 

Gerald Clayton Hartman x'34, Cat- 
awissa. Pa., April 16, 1959. He was 



chief administrator of the Southern 
Columbia School District and widely 
known in the fields of education and 
music. He was a graduate of Blooms- 
burg State College and earned the 
M.Ed, degree at Bucknell University. 

Coretta Dean Rager (Mrs. Ran- 
dolph) x'28, Beavertown, Pa., May 4, 
1969. A school teacher in Snyder and 
Mifflin Counties, she also was a 
licensed practical nurse. She was a 
member of Baker's United Methodist 
Church, McClure. Officiating at 
funeral services was the Rev. A. John 
Perna x'53. 

Albeit H. Salem '28. Midland, 
Mich., May 1, 1969. A teacher, 
basketball and football coach at the 
former Franklin Borough H.S.. Cone- 
maugh. Pa., 1929-1946, he then taught 
in the Pirna Indian School, Phoenix. 
Ariz., 1947-1957, and in 1957 became 
Postmaster in Sacaton. Ariz. 



SPRING 1969 



43 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 




POSTMASTER: Please notify if undelivered. 

Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



Zf>1 



SUMMER 1969 



Susquehanna Alumnus 




The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Vol. 38 



SUMMER 1969 



No. 4 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Publish- 
ed four times a year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



In years past, the annual Report of the 
President of Susquehanna University was dis- 
tributed to the Board of Directors and other 
selected persons, but not to the alumni body 
as a whole. This year, this entire issue of 
Susquehanna Alumnus is devoted to Dr. Web- 
er's report so that all alumni may share in 
the accomplishments of 1968-69 and the cur- 
rent thinking and planning of the administra- 
tion. The report was prepared with the assist- 
ance of Homer W. Wieder Jr., assistant to the 
president for development. 




Report of the President 1968-69 




\\ 



EMPHASIS ON PEOPLE" 



The impersonal nature of modern society manifests itself in many ways. 
Psychologists tell us that as life becomes more complex, the individual feels an 
increasing sense of insecurity and lack of purpose. His reach for identity comes 
into direct conflict with the intricacies of modern-day living and with a society 
largely concerned with the preservation of its own self-interests. 

The task of a college or university is to prepare its students for that 
which lies ahead. Realizing that change comes with increasing frequency and 
that these changes often serve to further inhibit individual initiative and produc- 
tivity, the academician's responsibility becomes one of teaching what is relevant 
and of finding such a relationship between his discipline and contemporary society. 

This is to say that the challenge faced by Susquehanna and by other col- 
leges and universities is of a rather paradoxical nature. On the one hand we 
must be alert to the lessons of history and to the perspective which historical 
documentation can contribute to modern-day problems. On the other hand, we 
must recognize that much of what has formerly been taught seems now to be 
irrelevant, and new methods and teaching priorities are essential if the colleges 
of today are to prepare the leaders of tomorrow. 

Susquehanna recognizes the importance of teaching historical perspective 
and, at the same time, is ever mindful of the need to orient contemporary higher 
education in such a manner as to have meaning today. 

Our emphasis now is on the student and on his development as a liberally 
educated person. This implies that the University must remain attuned to the 
times and be committed to providing the essentials of an educational experience 
capable of fostering confidence in the student and in the future of the society 
in which he lives. 

This Report of the President is the eleventh such statement I have been 
privileged to submit. You will note that its emphasis is on people — for they 
are indeed the University. We hope that you will find this summary of the 
events and activities of the past year of interest and share with us the sense of 
growth and achievement that represents the story of Susquehanna today! 



^/0»~£l Q (^^___ 



September 1969 



SUMMER 1969 




"... cultivation and retention 
of the mutual trust of the various 
parts of the campus community." 



STUDENTS 



The many publicized events which occurred on hundreds of college 
campuses during the past academic year speak for themselves. Even a majority 
of the responsible students on any campus exhibit today a dissatisfaction both 
with themselves and with contemporary society. Susquehanna University has 
been quick to recognize this dissatisfaction. Meeting these student frustrations 
head-on has involved the time and effort of many faculty, administrators, and 
even Board members. Perhaps it would even be safe to say that student affairs 
occupied more than a proportionate share of the University's time during the 
past ten months. But the general feeling prevails on campus that such efforts 
were worthwhile and highly productive. This is not to say that Susquehanna is 
free from those problems which have paralyzed many colleges and universities, 
but it is to say that the University community — faculty, administration, students 
and Board members — is earnestly attempting to grapple with and understand 
the concerns of today's college generation. 

The efforts of the University have been directed toward striving for 
cultivation and retention of the mutual trust of the various parts of the campus 
community. 

In comparison with other colleges and universities, Susquehanna's cam- 
pus was quiet. Much of the credit must be given to the students themselves, 
and to those who sit in positions of leadership in the student government. The 
Dean's office as well as that of the Dean of Students have directed major atten- 
tion to establishing student relations on the basis of mutual trust and respect 
without capitulation. One way of accomplishing this was by associating an in- 
creasing number of students as full-time voting members of various University 
committees. The Curriculum, Admissions, ad hoc Long-Range Planning, and 
ad hoc Curriculum committees serve as examples to illustrate this point. Fur- 
thermore, an annual weekend retreat involving all elements of the University 
has been highly successful in providing an interchange of ideas among Board 
members, faculty, students and adminstration. Student involvement in this way 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



has been beneficial both to the student through an increased awareness of Univer- 
sity problems and to the University by the mature way in which the students 
have handled these assignments. As long as the students continue to exercise 
an advanced degree of maturity and contribute constructively to these delibera- 
tions, the University will be inclined to increase student participation in University 
affairs. 

The contemporary quest for student power with its attendant unrest has 
received little publicity at Susquehanna. Students have been given a more active 
role in college life and the University believes that this is constructive. In addition 
to the degree of participation mentioned above, the students are represented at 
meetings of the Board of Directors and make all decisions on discipline for in- 
fractions of campus rules and behavior. At present, the Student Senate is at- 
tempting to develop a faculty rating system which would seek to determine a 
teacher's effectiveness. Such participation serves to help bring about improve- 
ments in the programs of instruction and to contribute to satisfying relationships 
among faculty, administrators and the students themselves. 

The University has confidence in its student body. Most students are 
mature and willing to work through proper channels for change and identity. 
They honor sincere dissent and criticism but will not tolerate irresponsible actions 
on the part of minority groups which infringe upon the rights of other students. 
In short, their overriding concern is that of seeking an education which is relevant. 

The University supports as fundamental to the democratic process the 
right of all members of the academic community to express their views and to 
protest actions or opinions with which they disagree, provided they do so in a 
peaceful and orderly way. A University must remain a place where diverse ideas 
and viewpoints contend for acceptance in a continuing search for truth in an 
atmosphere free of any recourse to physical force. 

It is in the area of determining what is relevant in education today that 
the University expends much effort. Involvement is the key, and Susquehanna 
continues to encourage its students to become involved in the contemporary 
problems of the day. The location of the University in a predominantly rural 
area provides little handicap, even though much of the "action" seems to be 
taking place in the urban centers of our country. 





SUMMER 1969 




A real start has been made in exposing the students to problems of 
society and in offering them the opportunity to participate first-hand in their 
solution. The Admissions Office spends about 25 percent of its time recruiting 
students from disadvantaged backgrounds; 23 students participated in a tutoring 
program for disadvantaged high school youths from Snyder County last semester; 
many students work at the Selinsgrove State School and Hospital and volunteer 
their time for the various charitable agencies in the Susquehanna Valley; other 
students have helped provide day care for the children of migrant workers when 
they visit the area; and the students sponsor trips to inner-city areas to learn 
first-hand the problems of the ghetto. 

Of special interest is a proposal by the Department of Music to send 
its students to the inner-city areas of Philadelphia during the summer months to 
work with the disadvantaged who have aptitudes in music. 

All of these programs are relevant to today's student and add a dimension 
of meaning to his educational experience not encountered in the classroom. In- 
deed, if this type of "en the spot" educational training can be further refined 
and encouraged, Susquehanna students will be that much better prepared to 
assist in solving the great economic and social problems of the times. 

This information should tell the reader much about the current group of 
Susquehanna students. The nature of the student body has changed markedly 
in recent years. Students now attend Susquehanna from some 20 states and six 
foreign countries. The average student ranked in the second fifth of his secondary 
school graduating class and had College Board scores of well over 500 in each 
category, verbal and math. His background is average middle class and the 
chances are almost one in two that he receives some form of financial aid from 
the University or from a private or state scholarship or loan program. 

More often than not he was attracted to Susquehanna because he recognized 
the unique opportunities inherent in attending a college which preserves the 
congenial atmosphere of the small college, but which offers a range and depth 
of undergraduate studies in the sciences and humanities, the performing arts 
and in areas of professional preparation customarily found in the large university. 

According to present registration figures, the Class of 1973 will number 
about 415, bringing the total campus enrollment to a little over 1200, slightly 
more than last year's record. In June of this year the University graduated 259 
seniors, of whom 35 were planning immediate entrance into graduate schools 
and 43 were headed directly into the teaching profession, which would demand 
some form of graduate study within two years. Thus, at the time of their 
graduation, at least 31 percent were anticipating graduate work. Annual alumni 
surveys of recent Susquehanna graduates indicate that this proportion, within 
six months of the graduation date, usually increases to approximately 50 percent 
of the total who actually are engaged in or planning education beyond the 
bachelor's level. 




SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




"... where emphasis is 
on the classroom performance 
of the instructor in an 
atmosphere of interaction 
between teacher and student." 



FACULTY 



Susquehanna takes pride in its role as a teaching institution where the 
emphasis is on the classroom performance of the instructor in an atmosphere of 
interaction between teacher and student. So that we can attract the kind of 
faculty we need, much of the University's effort in recent years has been directed 
toward raising professorial salaries. In the past decade faculty salaries have 
more than doubled at Susquehanna, and have now arrived at a point where the 
average compensation exceeds $10,000. These figures denote average salaries 
for the various ranks: Full Professor — $13,700; Associate Professor — $11,426; 
Assistant Professor — $9,854; Instructor — $8,843. The University is competitive 
with similar institutions in this regard and, for the first time, ranks well in the 
survey of faculty salaries made annually by the American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors. 

This constant improvement in the quality of the faculty manifests itself 
in many ways, including the list of scholarly activities of the faculty for the year 
just concluded. In the field of publications, Dr. Robert L. Bradford, Associate 
Professor of Political Science, contributed a chapter on "The Problems of 
Separate Development in Southwest Africa" to a book to be published by Free 
Press. Dr. William H. Jennings, Assistant Professor of Religion, published an 
article entitled, "Some Observations on the Church-Related College in a Secular 
Society," for Liberal Education, December 1968. Mrs. Margaret A. Rogers, 
Instructor in Mathematics, has received acceptance of an article, "The Rationale of 
Slide Rule Manipulations," and has submitted a second paper on "An Algorithm 
for Partial Fraction Expansion" to the Mathematics Teacher. Dr. Gerald R. 
Gordon, Assistant Professor of History, has submitted a paper to Labor History. 
Dr. Robert M. Goodspeed, Assistant Professor of Geology, co-authored "The 
Origin of Antiperthites from Some Charnockitic Rocks in the New Jersey 
Precambrian." in the American Mineralogist. Dr. Nancy A. Cairns, Associate 



SUMMER 1969 



HIHHIiW: 




Professor of French, published an article entitled, "Emile Henriot: His Criteria 
of Judgment," and Dr. William A. Russ, Jr., Professor Emeritus of History, one 
entitled "Public Opinion on the Political Results of the Civil War," in Susque- 
hanna Studies. Dr. James R. Misanin, Assistant Professor of Psychology, has 
co-authored several brief articles, "Retention of a Light-Dark Discrimination in 
Rats of Different Ages," Journal of Comparative Physiological Psychology, 1968; 
"Recovery of Memory Following Amnesia" in Nature 1968; "Amnesia as a 
Function of Events During the Learning ECS Interval" in /. Cornp. Physiol. 
Psychol., 1969; "Basic Drives," Annual Review of Psychology, 1969; "Selective 
Amnesia in Rats Produced by Electroconvulsive Shook," /. Comp. Physiol. 
Psychol., in press, 1969; "Sensitivity and Reactivity to Shock Following Elec- 
troconvulsive Shock Stimulation" has been submitted to Physiology and Behavior. 
Dr. Frank W. Fletcher, Associate Professor of Geology, published a paper on the 
"Late Devonian Paleogeography in southeast New York and northeast Penn- 
sylvania," appearing in the Proceedings of the International Symposium on 
the Devonian. 

During the course of the year, Susquehanna's faculty also read several 
papers at professional meetings. Dr. Fletcher read two papers at the University 
of Bologna, Italy, with the title, "Stratigraphy, Sedimentation and the Evolution 
of the Catskill Basin." Dr. Misanin co-authored a paper he read at the Psycho- 
nomic Society Meetings in St. Louis entitled, "Recovery of Memory Following 
Amnesia." In August of this year, Dr. Kenneth O. Fladmark, Professor of 
Business Administration, read a paper dealing with the subject of his dissertation 
to the American Marketing Association in Cincinnati. Finally, Dr. Elizabeth 
Wiley, Associate Professor of English, presented a paper on "Dickens or the 
Grotesque" to the Pittsburgh Dickens Fellowship. 

Contributing greatly to this scholarly activity were research grants ob- 
tained by the faculty during the fiscal year just concluded. It should be pointed 
out that this kind of scholarly work is encouraged by the University, as long 
as the end result brings increased competence to the classroom. Although re- 
search is considered a secondary function of the faculty, it does serve to sharpen 
a professor's skill within a discipline and often provides students with an op- 
portunity to participate in research activity at the undergraduate level. 

Dr. Z. Michael Nagy, Assistant Professor of Psychology, has received 
a $25,000 research award from the National Science Foundation, while Dr. 
Misanin has received a similar award from the National Institute of Health. Dr. 
Nagy has also received a $2,000 Lutheran Church in America Research and 
Creativity Grant for the study of thermal adaptation. 

At the same time, the University is becoming increasingly successful in 
securing funds from government and private sources for equipment and for educa- 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



tional innovation. The interdepartmental efforts of Geology, Psychology, Physics 
and Biology were successful in obtaining federal funds to substantially cover a 
$25,000 request for instructional equipment, while, at the same time, the 
Chemistry Department received $15,000 worth of laboratory equipment from 
the Gulf Oil Corporation. The Mathematics Department received support from 
the National Science Foundation toward the purchase of three calculators to be 
used primarily in the rapidly growing area of applied mathematics. 

While these grants serve to augment the departmental budgets of the 
disciplines concerned, they also speak well for the aggressiveness of the members 
of these departments in pursuing funds to strengthen their instructional programs. 
Such grants serve to bring about innovation both in the classroom and in the 
laboratory. Dr. Howard DeMott, head of the Biology Department, recently re- 
ceived a grant from the National Science Foundation for closed-circut television 
experimentation in laboratory sessions. This type of departure from traditional 
laboratory procedure will standardize instruction in all laboratory sections of a 
course by exposing all students to the same taped lecture for a particular ex- 
periment. The potential in this field for the years ahead is exciting! 




Participation by members of the faculty continues to increase within 
professional and civic organizations. Last year, 48 faculty members attended 
77 professional meetings on the state and national levels. This activity has ex- 
tended increasingly into community life as well. At least ten faculty mem- 
bers, in addition to the Department of Education, have given their services, ex- 
pertise, and knowledge to area high schools either as consultants to or as 
participants in various educational programs. 

The steps taken recently to bring a very significant improvement in fac- 
ulty salaries, as indicated by the AAUP rating, have had a salutary and very 
settling effect on the upper three levels of the faculty. Very few of the 14 faculty 
members leaving the University this summer did so for greater financial oppor- 
tunities. Only four have accepted positions at other colleges; the rest have 
either retired, returned to graduate school to complete their doctorates, or 
decided to leave the teaching profession. 

The University expresses its appreciation for the services rendered by 
those members of the faculty who terminated their employment with Susque- 
hanna in June of this year. They are Dr. Joseph B. Flotten, University Chaplain; 



SUMMER 1969 



Lira Martinez Lourdes, Instructor in Spanish; Marie-Chantal Venin, Instructor in 
French; Anne Phillips, Instructor in Music; John W. Blanpied, Instructor in 
English; Donald E. Wissinger, Assistant Professor of Education; Joseph Naun- 
chik. Instructor in Physical Education; Joseph J. Pavlos, Instructor in Philosophy; 
Dennis C. Trudell, Instructor in English; Robert A. Schanke, Assistant Professor 
of Speech; William H. Jennings, Assistant Professor of Religion; Judith A. Blee, 
Lecturer in Music; John M. Coar, Instructor in Sociology; John H. Drumm, 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics; and Glen E. Morgan, Visiting Associate 
Professor of Music. 

At the same time, the University has granted leaves of absence to four 
members of the faculty for the coming year. Dr. Gynith C. Giffin, head of the 
Chemistry Department; Dr. Bruce L. Nary, Professor of Speech; and Dr. Robert 
L. Bradford, Associate Professor of Political Science, will be on sabbatical leave. 
Dr. Giffin will work in industrial research, Dr. Nary will study drama in Greece, 
and Dr. Bradford will teach in Cuttington College, Liberia. In addition, Dr. 
Charles A. Rahter, Professor of English, was granted a leave of absence without 
salary to continue his study of linguistics at Harvard University. 

Five members of the faculty completed higher degrees during the college 
year just concluded. Mr. Kenneth Fladmark who is promoted to Professor of 
Business Administration, earned his Ph.D. at Penn State University. Miss Lucia 
S. Kegler, Associate Professor of Modern Languages, received her Doctor of Mod- 
ern Languages from Middlebury College. Mr. Leone E. Re, Instructor in French, 
and Mr. Paul Lerner, Instructor in Classical Languages, completed their M.A. 




10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



degrees, while Mr. Daniel A. McGowan, Instructor in Economics, earned a 
second master's degree. 

In addition to Dr. Fladmark's promotion, it is a pleasure to announce 
the promotion of Dr. Fred A. Grosse to Professor of Physics, Dr. Gerald R. 
Gordon to Associate Professor of History, Mr. Gene R. Urey to Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Political Science, and Mr. J. Thomas Walker to Assistant Professor of 
Sociology. 

No major changes in the academic program occurred during the past 
year. For the most part, departments have made needed adjustments which 
will keep course offerings in agreement with the needs of students for future 
work at the graduate level or in the professions. In general, the offerings of the 
University are sufficiently varied to provide the basic liberal arts education, and 
efforts, therefore, continue to be directed toward further strengthening the faculty 
of more than 100 and in updating the existing curricular offerings to keep in 
tune with modern educational demands. 

Although this apparent period of consolidation will carry over into the 
next academic year, studies of major significance to the future of the University 
are now underway. First, for several years calendar reform has been under dis- 
cussion. After making an evaluation among faculty and the student body, the 
Curriculum Committee decided to appoint an ad hoc Faculty Committee to study 
both the calendar and the curriculum, because it was decided that these are 
inevitably interrelated. A continuous study of curriculum revision is essential 
today and has a twofold objective: First, to find ways to direct student involve- 
ment in the problems of our times and, second, to encourage the departments 
to keep abreast of changes in their fields and to restructure their offerings when 
necessary. This latter objective will eliminate the often hidden proliferation in 
courses and bring the opportunity for more innovative thinking, especially along 
interdisciplinary lines. 

Cooperative programs will play an important role at Susquehanna during 
the years ahead as a means of both utilizing the resources of sister institutions and 
exposing students to areas of instruction or expertise not now available at Sus- 
quehanna. Significant progress was made in two areas during the past year. 
In the field of computer science, Susquehanna is planning to install a remote 
terminal facility on the campus which will link up with the computer center at 
Bucknell University. For a modest cost annually, the University will have the 
benefit of modern computer technology on this campus unequaled at most smaller 
colleges. Starting this fall, Susquehanna will have a computing center on campus 
with ready access to the one million dollar Sigma-7 computer at Bucknell. Mr. 
Wallace Growney, head of the Mathematics Department, will also serve as the 
first Director of the Computing Center at Susquehanna. 

Another area of interinstitutional cooperation is in the field of library 
science. Susquehanna has joined forces with 14 other central Pennsylvania 
colleges and universities to form the Area College Library Cooperative Program. 
Membership makes the volumes of other institutions available to Susquehanna 
students and will reduce significantly the duplication of many library materials 
that otherwise would have to be a permanent part of each college's collection. 

Other cooperative efforts with area colleges and universities are now 
being explored, and it is conclusive to state that interinstitutional cooperation will 
increase during the years immediately ahead. This type of program, when com- 
bined with the University's pending application to the Institute of European 
Studies and the presently available Washington and United Nations Semesters, 
will provide a meaningful beginning toward broadening the educational experience 
of the Susquehanna student. This is the kind of educational pursuit that is 
relevant today. 




SUMMER 1969 



1! 



"... emphasis during the next decade will 
gradually shift from buildings toward 
the more intangible educational goals." 



DEVELOPMENT 




The past decade has seen the physical development of the University 
exceed that of many similar institutions of higher education. The progress has 
been gratifying, but much remains to be done if Susquehanna is to achieve added 
stature during the years ahead. A good deal of thought is now being given to 
the next decade in terms of what Susquehanna University should be by 1975. 
Dr. DeMott of the Biology Department is chairman of an ad hoc committee 
charged with formulating a long-range plan for the University. The committee 
has been instructed "to take into account all of the facets of University activity as 
they relate to enrollment in 1975-80." 

While the final report of this committee will not be submitted to the 
President's Office for another month, several generalizations can be made about 
the future of Susquehanna. First, the University will remain a small, coeduca- 
tional college with enrollment increasing only gradually to a figure of 1,500 by 
1975. Second, a new and modern library, a physical educational building, and 
added dormitory capacity become primary building objectives of the ten-year 
program. Finally, the sum of $17,000,000 will be needed during the next decade 
to satisfy these requirements and to assure Susquehanna of resources adequate 
for meeting all long-range objectives. 

Even though the three buildings listed above are urgent needs of the 
University, the emphasis during the next decade will gradually shift from build- 
ings toward more intangible educational goals. In fact, approximately $10,000,- 
000 of the total will be utilized for endowment for strengthening the academic 
programs of the University. While more detail will be forthcoming shortly on 
future plans, it should be said here that Susquehanna faces the years ahead with 
a great optimism and with the realization that a firm base has now been estab- 
lished on which future progress can be made. 

The need for a new and modern library has been apparent to the mem- 
bers of the Board. Last winter, the University commissioned the architectural 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



firm of Wagner and Hartman, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, to prepare preliminary 
drawings for a new 40,000-square-foot library building for Susquehanna. The 
proposed building will contain space for 150,000 volumes — double the present 
capacity — and provide study space for some 450 students. It will be a vast im- 
provement over the present building which is only one-half this size and seats 
about 150 students. The new library will be the focal point on campus and will 
be located nearer to the center of the campus along University Avenue, between 
Chapel Auditorium and the Science Hall. Hopefully, this structure will become 
the primary building objective of the next capital campaign that will be an- 
nounced shortly, and that its construction can begin sometime within the next 
year to 18 months. 

A physical education building has been planned for a number of years, 
and it is hoped that this objective can finally be achieved during the earlier part 
of the ten-year program. Susquehanna's physical education program suffers 
as a result of insufficient space, and the varsity basketball team is forced to play 
all home games at the local high school. These facts are all recognized by the 
Board of Directors, who realize that the situation will become more critical as 
enrollment increases. 

Dormitory construction is the key to expanded enrollment, and it is an- 
ticipated that a new 200-man dormitory can be under construction on the campus 
by the summer of 1970. Funds for college housing are available from the De- 
partment of Housing and Urban Development at an interest rate of approximately 
three percent and construction imposes no great financial burden on the University. 

Much of the effort of the Development Office this year has been directed 
toward organizing plans for the next ten years, and involving more people in 
the affairs of the University. An Advisory Council of 50 alumni, parents and 
friends has been formed to help guide the development program and advise the 
University on other matters important to the future of the college. A Parents 
Association has been organized to more closely involve the parents in affairs of 
interest to them. 

Gifts and grants continue to play an ever increasing role in subsidizing the 
educational program of the University. For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1969, 
the University received gifts in the amount of $664,211.51 from 1,545 donors. 
Included in this total were three significant bequests from the estates of Katherine 
M. Vastine, I. Newton Catherman, and Mary L. Haggerty. The fiscal year just 
ended was one of the most successful in Susquehanna's history for gifts and 
grants. Growing support from alumni and friends gives the University hope of 
achieving the even greater degree of support which will be necessary in future 
years. 

Once again the University would like to express its thanks to the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Alumni Association and the officers and leadership of 
the 18 district alumni clubs. Under the able leadership of Marlyn R. Fetterolf, 
the Alumni Association continued to expand its activities during the year just 
ended. Club meetings were held in 18 separate areas and it is estimated that 
850 alumni and parents attended these meetings. While substantial progress 
has been made in expanding the activities of alumni, the University will move 
toward further expansion of these activities and increase the guidance and direc- 
tion offered from the campus. 

The Women's Auxiliary deserves a special pat on the back for its con- 
tinued interest in the University. Members of the Auxiliary have contributed in 
excess of $60,000 to various University projects over the past five years. The 
tireless efforts of Miss Katherine P. Reed and her enthusiastic group are warmly 
applauded by all those close to Susquehanna. 

SUMMER 1969 13 



Summary Statement 

of Current Income and Expenditures 

Year Ended June 30, 1969 



"Tuition and fees 
continue to provide 
about 60 percent 
of the total ..." 



CURRENT INCOME: (Schedule 1) 
Educational and General: 
Tuition and Student Fees 
Investment Income 
Gifts and Grants for Current Use 
Other Sources 

Total Education and General 
Auxiliary Enterprises 

Total Current Income 

CURRENT EXPENDITURES: (Schedule 2! 
Educational and General: 
General Administration 
General Expenses 
Instruction Expenses 
Library 

Operation and Maintenance of 
Physical Plant 

Total Education and General 
Auxiliary Enterprises 
Student Aid (balance undistributed) 
Non-Educational Expenses 

Total Current Expenditures 

Excess of Current Income over m 
Current Expenditures (Exhibit B) 

NOTE: In addition to the stated current income deficit of 
$32,095.53 for 1968-69, the University also expended $70,893.08 
for furniture and equipment and $38,662.65 for library books. 
The budget for 1969-70, however, is projected to balance in- 
come expenditures. 



$1,940,559.07 

52,068.10 

135,257.36 

5,238.29 

2,133,122.82 
1,144,890.42 

3,278,013.24 



135,401.33 

510,383.31 

939,466.55 

73,600.00 

597,047.30 

2,255,898.49 

968,519.59 

84,323.17 

1,367.52 

3,310,108.77 



$( 32,095.53) 



FINANCES 



The University has entered a period of consolidation during the past two 
years following an era of pronounced accomplishment both physically and aca- 
demically. As Susquehanna outlines a development plan for the next decade, 
all concerned are at once aware of the challenge presented to private higher ed- 
ucation. Indeed, the University must call on alumni, parents and friends to 
support Susquehanna in an unprecedented manner if the University is to achieve 
its goals. Careful examination has determined that these goals are attainable 
and that the program now being outlined is indeed worthy of support. With 
the confidence, then, that all alumni and friends can be called upon to help, 
Susquehanna feels that a strengthened role in the field of higher education can 
be attained. 

The financial squeeze that now engulfs all institutions has caused Sus- 
quehanna to place some cost controls in non-critical areas and to attempt to 
keep the operating budget in balance by increasing gifts for current use. A vital 
factor in this latter regard is the Alumni Loyalty Fund, an appeal for annual 
gifts from alumni. While the fund has shown substantial growth during the past 
decade, Susquehanna ranks well below average in annual giving. Much effort will 
be expended in this area in future years, for it is only through gifts to current 
operations that a private college can balance its operating budget. 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



It is of interest to note that the operating budget of the University 
has increased from $686,669 to approximately $3,500,000 over the past decade. 
Tuition and fees continue to provide about 60 percent of the total, and the 
University is obligated to make up the difference through income from auxiliary 
enterprises, gifts and grants, and income-producing properties. 

Fully 40 percent of Susquehanna's students receive some form of financial 
aid. Thirty-three percent receive aid directly from the University while the 
remainder are subsidized from outside sources such as state scholarship programs 
or community scholarships. The class which entered in September of 1968 is 
receiving $195,000 in aid, with an average award of $1,450 per student. Overall, 
the University provides $300,000 in financial aid to students and commits an ex- 
ceedingly high figure of 10 percent of its educational budget for this purpose. 
While this percentage is much higher than that of many competing institutions, the 
University feels it is important to ensure a diversified student body with all socio- 
economic backgrounds represented. 

An unusually small endowment of $1,600,000 continues to hinder Sus- 
quehanna in its attempt to provide an even more meaningful educational ex- 
perience. Much of the thrust of the long-range plan will be devoted to increasing 
endowment through outright gifts and by means of an ongoing bequest program. 
With additional funds in endowment, extra income will be generated so that 
certain innovations not now possible because of budget limitations can be in- 
troduced into the educational program. 

In summary, much remains to be done, and the University has committed 
itself to this end. Confidence prevails that the small, church-related college can 
survive the years ahead, and prudent management together with a priority of 
meaningful educational objectives will assure fiscal solvency. 



SOURCES OF CURRENT INCOME 



GIFTS, 5% 




ENDOWMENT, 2% 
MISCELLANEOUS INCOME, 1% — ' 



SUMMER 1969 15 



ENROLLMENT AND APPLICATIONS 



Full-time Enrollment 



Applications for Admission 



The marked decrease in Applications received in 1966 and 1967 
was caused by an experimental procedural change then in effect. 



1600 

1400 

1200 

1000 

800 

600 

400 

200 




1049 1060 



'63 



'64 



1431 



981 



1420 



'65 



'66 



'67 



'68 



1450 1500 



'69 



'70 



GIFTS TO THE UNIVERSITY 



$1,000,000 

$ 900,000 

$ 800,000 

$ 700,000 

$ 600,000 

$ 500,000 

$ 400,000 

$ 300,000 

$ 200,000 

$ 100,000 



$725,000 



$302,000 



$305,000 



$664,000 




$488,000 



$550,000 



'62-'63 



'63-'64 



'64-'65 



'65-'66 



'66-'67 



'67-'68 



'68-'69 



16 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




^frfcrffc. ^11 



"Wo institution worth its name can avoid 

or neglect the responsibility of a 

continuing evaluation of purpose or function.' 



IN CONCLUSION 



Susquehanna University has now entered the second decade of the second 
century of its history, and it is extremely pertinent to examine most critically 
the role it is to play in the last third of the twentieth century. Never before has 
the college faced so many problems and challenges, as have all institutions of 
higher education, as those confronting Susquehanna now. The issues involved 
are the concern of students, faculty, administration. Board members, alumni, 
community leaders and friends. No institution worth its name can avoid or 
neglect the responsibility of a continuing evaluation of purpose or function. 

Leadership has always been the key to any successful institution. The 
Board of Directors of a college is charged with this leadership responsibility and 
Susquehanna University has been fortunate in the caliber of its Board members. 
For a total of 35 years, Mr. Charles A. Nicely has served Susquehanna with a 
loyalty and devotion seldom equalled by others. Advancing years have com- 
pelled Mr. Nicely to tender his resignation as a member of the Board. His resigna- 
tion has been accepted with regret and all members of the Susquhanna family wish 
him well during the years ahead. A note, too, should be made concerning Mrs. 
Nicely, whose interest in Susquehanna has paralleled that of her husband in recent 
years. A past president of the Women's Auxiliary and frequent member of the 
Executive Committee, she has brought immeasurable leadership and support to the 
college. 



SUMMER 1969 



17 



Dr. George L. Haller completed ten years of service to the University as 
a member of the Board in October of 1968 and, because of a contemplated move 
to Florida, asked to be relieved from his duties. 

The Rev. Franklin D. Fry, pastor of Christ Church, York, and a Synod 
representative on the Board, came to the end of his five-year term and expressed 
a desire not to stand for re-election. The Board and administration express their 
thanks to both Dr. Haller and Dr. Fry for their services to Susquehanna. 

Six new members were elected to the Board of Directors during the past 
year. Representing the Central Pennsylvania Synod are the Rev. David N. Finney, 
Jr., pastor of the Trinity Lutheran Church of Johnstown, who replaces Pastor Fry, 
and Mrs. Kimball D. Miller, a member of St. Mark's Church in Williamsport, who 
replaces Dr. Lawrence C. Fisher, whose two terms made him ineligible to serve 
as a Synod representative. 

Joining these two new members are three area businessmen elected directly 
to the Board at the May 1969 meeting. They are Mr. Jack P. Shipe, a member 
of the Class of 1940 and former Director of Manufacturing for Creative Play- 
things in Herndon; Mr. Samuel H. Evert, President of the S. H. Evert Company, 
Incorporated of Bloomsburg; and Mr. William O. Faylor, Sr., President of the 
Faylor Lime and Stone Company of Winfield. Mr. Frank K. Fetterolf, Class of 
1948, of Johnstown was also elected to the Board at the October 1968 meeting. 
The University welcomes these additions and looks forward to the assistance they 
can provide in helping Susquehanna chart a course during the years ahead. 

In conclusion, the year just ended was both eventful and fruitful. A 
major accomplishment was the formulation of plans for the decade ahead. The 
mission of the University was succinctly stated by Dr. Lloyd J. Averill, former 
President of the Council of Protestant Colleges and Universities, who spoke on 
campus last fall. He said that the small, church-related college definitely will 
survive the years ahead if it provides the following essential elements: 
— smallness and residentiality 
— institutional commitment 
— liberal education 

— concern for the meaning of experience 
— moral seriousness 
— the academic study of religion 

Dr. Averill called this the "Agenda for the Protestant College." 

It is gratifying to note that the most challenging contemporary educational 
thought corresponds to Susquehanna's own intentions and efforts. 




18 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 1969-70 



Mr. John B. Apple 

Vice President, Butter Krust Baking Co. 
Sunbury, Pa. 

Dr. Roger M. Blough. Esq. 

Attorney at Law. White & Case 
New York. N.Y. 

The Rev. Dr. F. William Brandt 
Pastor, First Lutheran Church 
Altoona, Pa. 

Mr. William R. Burchfield 
President, J. C. Decker, Inc. 
Montgomery, Pa. 

Mr. Alvin W. Carpenter, Esq. 
Attorney at Law 
Carpenter. Carpenter & Dielil 
Sunbury, Pa. 

The Hon. Preston B. Davis 
State Senator 
Milton. Pa. 

Mr. Samuel H. Evert 

President, S. H. Evert. Inc. 
Bloomsburg, Pa. 

Mr. William O. Faylor 

President, Fax/or Lime & Stone Co. 
Winfield, Pa'. 

Mr. Frank K. Fetterolf 
Vice President, 
Tliomas-Kinzey Lumber Co. 
Johnston. Pa. 

The Rev. Mr. David N. Finney, Jr. 

Pastor. Trinity Lutheran Church 

Johnstown, Pa. 
Dr. Lawrence C. Fisher 

Physician 

York. Pa. 

The Rev. Dr. Walter B. Freed 
Pastor, 

Lutheran Church of the Reformation 
Rochester, N.Y. 

The Rev. Dr. John D. Harkins 

Retired Pastor 

State College. Pa. 
Dr. John C. Horn 

President. Prismo Universal 

Huntingdon. Pa. 
Mr. Orlando W. Houts 

President, O. W. Houts & Son 

Stale College. Pa. 
Mr. Lawrence M. Isaacs 

Vice President & Controller. RCA 

New York, N.Y. 
The Rev. Mr. Lester J. Karschner 

Pastor, Zion Lutheran Church 

Hollidaysburg, Pa. 
The. Rev. Dr. Richard C. Klick 

Pastor, St. Paul's Lutheran Church 

York, Pa. 

Mrs. Howard E. Koontz 
Homemaker 

Westminster. Md. 



Mr. J. William Lenker 
Retired Businessman 
Sunbury, Pa. 

The Rev. Mr. Paul B. Lucas 

Pastor, Second Lutheran Church 
Chambersburg. Pa. 

The Rev. Dr. Howard J. McCarney 

President, Central Pennsylvania Synod 
of the Lutheran Church in America 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

The Rev. Dr. Richard B. Martin 
Pastor, St. Paul's Lutheran Church 
Williamsport, Pa. 

Mr. John R. Miller, Esq. 
Attorney at Law 
Bellefonte. Pa. 

Mrs. Kimball D. Miller 
Homemaker 
Williamsport, Pa. 

Mr. Joseph L. Ray 
Investment Broker 
Sunbury. Pa. 

Dr. Scott C. Rea 
Retired Businessman 
Sunbury, Pa. 

The Rev. Dr. William M. Rearick 
Retired Pastor 
Carlisle, Pa. 

Mr. Robert U. Redpath, Jr. 
Certified Life Underwriter 
New York, N.Y. 

Mr. Henry W. Rozenberg 
Retired Engineer 
Jersey Shore. Pa. 

Mr. Jack P. Shipe 

Retired Toy Manufacturer 
Herndon, Pa. 

Dr. Erie I. Shobert, II 

Vice President and Manager of 

Research, Stackpole Carbon Co. 

St. Marys, Pa. 
Mr. Carl H. Simon 

Executive Vice President. 

Darling Valve Co. 

Williamsport, Pa. 
Mr. Preston H. Smith 

President, Smith Printing Co. 

Williamsport, Pa. 
Mr. Norman E. Walz 

President. First National Bank 

Sunbury, Pa. 
Mr. Alan R. Warehime 

President, Hanover Brands 

Hanover. Pa. 
Mr. Ralph R. Witmer 

President, Snyder County Trust Co. 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 
The Rev. Dr. Gustave W. Weber 

President, Susquehanna University 



SUMMER 1969 



19 



DONORS TO SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 1968-69 



ALUMNI CONTRIBUTORS 



Cornelius S. Jarrett 
Nora G. Green 

1891 

**|. Newton Catherman (Estate) 

1898 

Brian Teats 

1899 

**L. C. Hassinger 

1900 

W. Ralph Wagenseller 

1901 

5. Ward Gramley 

1902 

*Maude Reichley Moist 
William W. Stauffer 

1903 

George M Mark 

1906 

-Margaret Rothrock Swank 

1908 

Vivian Hough Federlin 
Ralph W. Showers 

1909 

*Grace A Geiselman 
*Mervyn J. Ross (Deceased) 

Marion Ferner Sellers 
*John W- Thompson 

1910 

George B. Manhart 

1911 

"Claude G. Aikens (Estate) 
Miles R. Derk 
*William M. Duck 
Anna Kline Krebs 



1912 




*Earle 


F. Aurande 


1913 




*Maria 


Geiselman Gabrielson 


Newton Kerstetter 


:;: John 


B. Kniseley 


*R. L. 


Lubold 


* Sarah 


B. Manhart 


1914 




Mary 


Ressler Dale 



1915 

Jess Pleasanton Coxe 
= :: J. Frank Faust 
-John F. Harkins 
Emma Moyer Masteller 
Alice F. Weaver 
Catherine A. Weaver 
Gertrude F. Weaver 
**Ralph Witmer 

1916 

Martin L. Dolbeer 

J. Paul Harman 
:;: Mary Wagner Harkins 
*Bess Fetterolf Keller 

1917 

Anonymous 
-Phoebe Herman 

Park W. Huntington 

P. Kepner Jarrett 
-Elizabeth Hall Neideigh 
-Marion Moyer Potteiger 

1918 

Oscar H. Byerly (Deceased) 
Lulu Fetterolf Harman 
Eva P. Herman 
:;: Marion Rose Phillips 
Helen Fetterolf Riden 

1919 

*Willard D. Allbeck 

Christine Schoch Cassler 

Harry F. OCelia Speigelmire Shoaf 

M. Marion Weaver 
*Helen Salem Wescoat 



1920 

Russell F. Auman 
Evelyn Allison Boeder 
Esther Cressman 
Susan Rearick Shannon 
Paul G. Winey 

1921 

-Orris H. Aurand 
"-Guy M. Bogar 

-Mabel Steffen B'oscious 
Walter N. Bryan 

-Ida Olmsted Fredrickson 
Raymond F. Getty 
Yvonne Everest Harmon 
Marie Romig Huntington 

-Ellis K. Lecrone 
Ruth LaRue Thompson 
Mildred E. Winston 

1922 

-Merle A. Beam 

J. H. FleckensMne 

Lester J. Kaufman 

Alma L. Long 

Bessie C. Long 
-C. Howard Rothfuss 
-George W. Townsend 

1923 

Dorothy Margerum App 

John I. & Stella Risser Cole 
-Marlyn R. fetterolf 

Mary Beck Grant 

Russell P. Knoebel Sr. 
-Alice Rearick 
-Byron C. Rothfuss 

Thomas J. Weible 

1924 

Miriam Huyett Alexander 
-Margaret Widlund Blough 
--Alvin W. Carpenter 

W. John Derr 
--Mabel Kinzey Fetterolf 
Glenn E. Fisher 
Raymond W. K1ined;nst 
-Hilda Bohner Lutz ) o •> 
-Alma V. McCollough 
Joseph C. & Mabel Mumma 
McLain 
-Mary K. Potteiger 
Rachel Brubaker Whited 

1925 

-Norman R. Benner 

J. Edgar Bishop 
--Roger M. Blough 

Dorothy Clarke Creager 

Lewis R. Drumm Sr. 
*M. M. Enders 

Harland D. Fague 

Ralph C. Gramley 
-A. Ellsworth Grove (Deceased 1 

Hazel L. Herrold 

Robert J. Keeler 

William L. Nicholls 

Harold E. Stong 

J. F. Wetzel 

Neal W. Worm'ey 
-Sara Lenker Wiest 

Christie E. Zimmerman 

1926 

-Eugene T. Adams 
-Floyd L. Adams 

Lee E. Boyer 

Margaret Schmiermund Bruce 

Percy B. Davis 

Barbara E. DeRemer 

T. E. Ebberts 

Sara Hassinger Fague 

Hayes C. Gordon 

Mabel Dagle Gramley 

Helen Ulrich Hoffman 

Margaret E. Keiser 

Lester B. Lutz 

Martha Larson Martin 

Anna M. Norwat 

Dorothy W. Reeder 
--Harry M. Rice 

Austin C. Roche 
-W. Alfred Streamer 
-Lucy Herr Smith 

Ethel V. Taylor 
-Orren R. Wagner 

Luther M. Weaver Jr. 



Susquehanna University is pleased to publish the names 
of donors to the University for the period July 1, 1968 to June 
30, 1969. One asterisk denotes a gift of $100 or more and two 
asterisks denote a gift of $500 or more. 



1927 

Mary E. Bowerscx 
-Charles E. Chaffee 
Emily E. Craig 
Elsie Nace Enders 
Martin F. Foutz Sr. 
Delsey Morris Gross 
Laura Arnold Hart 
Zelda F. Haus 
Emily McElwee Jamison 
Anna Brosious Klinedinst 
Catherine Benner Kunkle 
Miles S. McLain 
H. Luther Rhodes 
Gertrude V. Walker 
Brooks L. Walton 
Clinton Weisenfluh 
Bert E. Wynn 
George N. Young 

1928 

John M. Auten 

W. C. Buss 

Margaret H. Buyers 
-Dorothy Rothermel Chaffee 

Elizabeth Stong Eichelberger 

Walter S. Ide 

Ruth Folkmann 

Jerome B. S. Kaufman 

--Elizabeth Hauser Kinsel 

-Hannah Pitner Lambert 

Paul B. Lucas 

Emma Baxter McCormick 

Mary Weimer Moffitt 

Marvin W. Schlegel 
-Ray G. Sheeler 
-Laentena McCahan Shelley 
-Spurgeon T. Shue 
-Carl G. Smith 
-Helen Ott Soper 

Sarah Seal Stauffer 

Mary Wentzel Updegrove 

1929 

Helen Simons Barrick 
-George E. Beam 

Adam P. Bingaman 

Helen Ammerman Brown 

Henry R. Carichner 

Robert W. & Mary Coons Crouse 

Lee S. Deppen 

Marian Klinger Derrick 

Charles E. Hilbish 

Gertrude Fisher Jones 

Ruth Dively Kaufman 

Rose Ann Gum'^ert Krape 

G. George Luck 

Harry J. Lupfer 

Helen Dehoff McCahan [OO 
-Clarence E. Phillips 

Mildred I. Potteiger 

Rebecca C. Puf'enberger 
*Katherine P. Reed 

Raymond O. Rhine 
-William O. Roberts 

Margaret Davis Runkle 

Harry P. Shaffer 

Russell T. Shilling 
-Millard C. Smith 

George A. & Gerturde Arbogast 
Spaid 

Walter W. Swank 

Frank C. Wagenseller 
-Helen K. Weaver 

1930 

-Paul M. Bishop 

Edward T. Bollinger 

Dorothy Heiser Fisher 
-Raymond P. Garman 

Sherman E. Good 

Wellington P. Hartman 
-Russell C. Heim 
-Lewis C. Herrold 
-Mary Eastep Hill 

Oren S. Kaltnter 

Arthur E. Lecrone 

J. Richard Mattarn 
-Myer R. Musser Sr. 
-Ruth Goff Nicodemus 



John S. Rhine 
-Luke H. Rhoads 
-Simon B. Rhoads 

William F. Routzahn 

James M. Scharf 
--John H. Wall 

1931 

Alvin T. Barber 

Lois Brungart Bendigo 
-H. Vernon Blough 

Martha Laudenslager Davis 
--Lawrence C. Fisher 

Frank C. Gill 
-Paul M. Haines 

Paul W. Hartline 

Arlene Laudenslager Hatton 

Mary E. Lauver 
-Frank L. McCormick 
-Bryce E. Nicodemus 

Helen E. O'Connell (Deceased) 

Ruth Maurey Quinter 

Olive Williard Raker 

Ira C. Sassman 

Charles J. Shearer 
-W. Michael Weader 

Warren L. Wolf 

Sara Haines Zimmerman 

1932 

A. S. Benner 
Samuel B. Brosius 
Dorothy Puckey Clark 
Lee M. & Janet Leitzel 

Fairchild 
-Herman R. Fenstermacher 

Roscoe L. Fisher 

Lewis R. Fox 

Mary Weaverling Garber 

Herbert G. Hohman 

Dorothy Arbogast Kaltriter 

John F. Kindsvatter 

Andrew V. Kozak 

Arline Kanyuck Lerda 

Dorothy Forcey Pletcher 
-Harriett Leese Rosenquist 

Elizabeth Charles Wetzel 

Arthur E. Wilmarth 

1933 

John E. Ballentine 
*Grace C. Boyle 

Frederick L. Carl 

William F. Carolan 

Selon F. Dockey 

Martha A. Fisher 
-Laird S. Gemberling 

Martin Anthony Graykoskie 

Harry H. Johnson 

Harriet Miller Keefer 

Margaret Ide Maguire 
-William E. Royer 
-John A. Schoffs-all Sr. 

Frances Stambauqh Shade 

Flora Ellmore Shilling 
*J. Donald Steele 

William R. Swarm 

Amelia Krapf Williams 

Bruce F. & Marian Walborn 
Worth ington 

1934 

-James A. Bonsall 

Harry A. Carl 

E. M. Clapper 
-Edith Frankenfield Cramer 

B. Esther Ditchfield 

E. W. Huston y 

-D. Edgar & Aberdeen Phillips 1 ° 
Hutchinson 

Nelson J. King 

Isabella Horn Klick 
-Ruth Bergstresser Koch 

Eleanor Brown Miller 
-Pauline Crow Mount 
-Kathryn Jarrett Rhoads 
-Virginia Andrews Rhoads 

Lee D. Rishel 

Richard B. Shade 

Mary E. Spiggle 



20 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Sara Ulrich Tollinger 
:;: Arthur C. Webber 
Ella Oberdorf Wilson 

1935 

Timothy E. Barnes 

Robert R. Clark 

Ralph C. Geigle 

Charles G. Jones 
::::;: Louise Mehring Koontz 
* Stephen J. Martinec 

Frances Hubler Nuernberg 

Anna E. dinger 
**Erie I. Shobert II 
-Mary Patterson Yeager 

1936 

David R. Evans 

Kathryn Weber Finkbiner 
*James A. Grossman 
:;: Janet Earhart Harkins 

Horace M. Hutchinson 

Ruth Williamson Kelly 
:;: Rose Runk Mosher 

Robert W. Pritchard 

LaRue C. Shempp 

Ralph I. Shockey 

Elwood I. Stahl 

Marcella Chaya Turnbach 

Dorothy Turner 

Walter Wasilewski 
*Julius B. Weinberger 

Jacob D. Yaros 

1937 

Eleanor Jones Barnes 

Mary Scott Gumpher 

Newton E. Hess 
=:= Lester J. Karschner 

Paul S. Lubold 
*John C. McCune 
-Robert L. Mosher 

Elsie Myers 

Frances Smith Novinger 

Raymond Shaheen 

John B. Ulp 

Mary Ann Fox Wagenseller 

1938 

^Robert A. Boyer 

Ethel Ramer Coulter 

William H. Hudson 
-Ray W. Kline 
*Karl E. Kniseley 

Chester P. Norbert 

Verlin H. Smalts 
;: =*Preston H. Smith 

1939 

^William P. Ayers 

-Verna Gayman Baldwin 

-Robert M. Bastress 
Harold E. Bollinger 
Marguerite Border Cook 
Walter J. Drumm (Deceased) 
Miriam Miller Fisher 
John W. & Adelaide Stewart 

Hostetter 
John R. Knaul 

-W. Frank & Isabel Tewkesbury 
Laudenslayer 

-Eleanor Croft Learn 
Michael L. Mastovtch 
Kathryn R. Meyer 

-Paul D. Ochenrider 
Stephen W. Owen II 
Gladys Wentzel Phillips 
Mathilda Neudoerffer Powell 
Helen O. Rogers 

-Shirley Finkbeiner Stehlin 
Eleanor Saveri Wise 

1940 

*Hester Bittinger Ayers 

Elizabeth J. Barnhart 

John D. Bice 

Betty Lerew Bloodworth 

Andrew A. Clark Jr. 

Donald A. Critchfield 

Edward E. Eisenhart 

Robert F. Fisher 
-Robert A. Gabrenya 
-William H. Gehron Jr. 

J. Leon Haines 

Horace A. Kauffman 

Kenneth R. & Naomi Bingaman 
Kinney 
--Florence Rothermel Latsha 
-John A. Learn 

William E. Nye II 

Paul M. Orso y cO 

Mary Catherine Mack Pendered 

Robert G. Sander 



-Hilda Freiderick Schadel 
*Harold E. Shaffer 
::t,:t Jack P. Shipe 

Barner S. Swartz 

Eugene F. Williams 

Virginia Mann Wolven 

1941 

:: 'George H. Bantley 

Florence Reitz Brenneman 
-Joseph F. Campana 

Lois Yost Critchfield 
-Warren C. Herrold 

Elaine Miller Hunt 
-Mary Emma Yoder Jones 
-Jane Hutchison Kaempfer 
:;t Margaret Dunkle Kniseley 

Douglas A. Portzline 

John P. Powell 
*Willard H. Schadel 
-Ruth Naylor Shaffer 
-Sara Wormley Shaffer 
:;: Paul C. Shatto 

Robert A. Updegrove 

1942 

Stanley Baxter 

Mildred E. Bittner 
-Sanford P. Blough 

Frederick O. Brubaker 

Janet Shockey Einstein 

Sovilla Rowe Gargie 
-Melvin E. Haas 

Jeanne Fenner Helm 

June Hendricks Hoke 
*Martin W. Hopkins 

Delphine Hoover Reitz 
-Edward S. Jr. & Blanche Forney 

Rogers 
*Philip R. Templin 

1943 

John C. Helm 
-Dorothy Dellecker Hochstuhl 

Marion Crow llgen 
-*Lawrence M. Isaacs 

Frederic G. MacQuesten 
^Marjorie Wolfe McCune 

Jessie Walton Schmitthenner 

Donald F. & Ruth Billow Spooner 

1944 

William A. Jr. & Margaret 

Gemmill Janson 
Jean Renter Kolb 
E. Jane Stitt 
Catherin Byrod Whitman 

1945 

Mary Moyer Bringman 
Jean Kinzer Brinser 
>;>:: Louise Kresge Isaacs 
Corinne Kahn Kramer 
LaVerne Kohn Mahony 
Joyce Jenkins McCIure 
Edna McVicker 
Herman G. Stuempfle Jr. 

1946 

Donald R. Bashore 

Albert L. Cage Jr. 
*James R. Clark 

Marie Klick Hodick 
*Roswell J. Johns 

Betty Herr McKelvey 

Marjorie Barton Myers 

1947 

William E. Bomgardner 

Franklin E. Fertig 
-Raymond G. Hochstuhl 
-Gayle Clark Johns 

Nancy Myers Landis 

Richard D. MogMa 

George E. Riegel 
:;: lra A. Wasserberg 

Elise Thompson Wohlsen 

1948 

Dale S. Bringman 
-Harry W. & Virginia Doss Butts 
-George A. Cooper 
-Aloysius V. Derr 

Elaine Laks Dunn 
*H. Lee Hebel 

Caroline Graybill Heimberger 

Donald L. Herrold 

Betty Reisch Jones 

Carolyn Hope Harbeson Kier 

Donald A. King 

Harold R. Kramer 

Marlin P. Krouse 



Charles L. & Eleanor Steele Lady 
Richard W. & Gertrude Roberts 

Lindemann 
Kenneth D. Loss 
William H. McCIure 
Lois Dauberman Schultz 
Augustus V. Tietbohl 
Dexter N. Weikel 
Robert F. Wohlsen 
William P. Yancho^ c 
Mananna Hazen Zimmerman 

1949 

Douglas Arthur 

Elaine Williams Barner 

Paul R. Bingaman 

Harriet MacNamara Bowen 

Betsy Hill Clark 
-•' :< Theron W. Conrad 
-Phyllis Swartz Derr 

John G. Devine 

Donald Fosselman 

Frances Savidge Foster 

Irma Strawbridge Hallenbeck 

Mary Jane Jessen Hansen 
-Edith Wegner Hebel 

Mary Ann Getsinger Homan 

Harry R. Johnston 

Jean Young Kaufman 

Margaret Appleby Kemmler 

Winifred Myers Odell 

Warren S. & Margaret Latta 
Outerbridge 

James B. Reilly 

Grace Billow Reinholds 

Ruth Klinger Reisenweaver 

Helen Smith Sanders 
-Nevin C. T. Shaffer 

Joyce Bottdorff Sheaffer 
*Ralph H. Tietbohl Jr . 

1950 

*H. Donald Beigh Jr. 

E. L. Bernstine 

Paul B. & Virginia Blough 
Buehler 

Maria Shetler Bull 

Cecilia Auman Ciccotello 

Theodore H. Clark 

Donald R. Davis 
-James C. Gehris 

Charles H. Grund 

Flons Guyer Hains 

Barbara Watkins Hartley 

M. Patricia Houtz 

Roger C. Howling 

Joseph A. Ladika 
-Raymond C. Lauver 
*Albert P. Jr. & Louise Siemers 
Molinaro 

Mina Sarba Norwood 
:; 'Jeanne M. Orner 

John A. Reuther 

Franklin T. Ulman 

Paul A. Wagner 

Barbara Anderson Wilson 
*Donald E. Wissinger 
*Donald F. Wohlsen 

1951 

*Marsh C. Bogar 

Hazel Brobst Brown 

Alice Yonghaus Davenport 

Nelda Shafer Davis 

Marianne Fague 
**W. Donald Fisher 

William J. Foster Jr. 
*Martha Martin Gehris 

Lois Seybrecht Grund 

Herbert R. Hains Jr. 

Marjorie Alexander Harbst 

Robert J. Henninger 

Jean Van Voorhis McAndrew 

Gerald E. Moorhead 
-Martha Albert Putnam 

Marilyn Beers Reilly 

William R. Smeltz 
-Susan Foltz Tietbohl 
-Lucius L. Walton 

Fern Baumgardner Weaver 
-Flora Barnhart Wissinger 
-Betty Beam Wohlsen 
-Shirley A. Young 

1952 

Russell C. Bartle 

Donald C. Berninger 
-Charles H. & Voylet Dietz Carr 
-James Hazlett 

Patricia F. Heathcote 

Lester C. Helman Jr. 

Bernice Jochem Howling 
-Kay Worthington Lauver 



Kenneth A. Lenker 
George C. Liddington 
JoAnn Alexander McAllister 
Ethel McGrath Meola 
James W. Morris 
Miriam Vogler Olson 
Kathleen Schnerr Price 
William H. Prichard 
David G. Volk 

1953 

Clara Williams Anderson 
Edward P. Kopf 
Robert J. MacNamara Jr. 
Bettie Winey Moorhead 
T. Justin Myers Jr.yc* 
*Paul R. Nestler 
Arthur K. Olson 
Kenneth E. Orris 
Dorothy Apgar Ross 
Arthur W. & Lilliam Whittington 

Roush 
Dean E. Rupe 
Ernest R. Walker 
Margaret Zinda Weaver 
Robert C. Wyllie 

1954 

Henry R. Albright Jr. 

George B. & Claire Haggerty 
Backer 
-William F. Delbaugh 
-Nora Steinhards Galins 
-Joyce K. Gilbert 

Wallace E. Gordon 

Marlin V. Heffner 

Joanne L. Heinly 

Irene Oldt Huss 

Shirley Thompson Khalouf 

Edward E. Lamb Jr. 
^Orville H. & Jean Rowe Lauver 

Lorraine Rarick Liddington 

Stanley S. & Patricia Hess 
Manning 
-Robert C. & Jane Cline 
Mickatavage 

Margarete Hults Olson 

Alexander T. Oshirak 

Eleanore Steffey Rachau 

Samuel D. Ross Jr. 

John H. Schraeder 

1955 

Walter C. Albert Jr. 

Ivars Avots 

Larry R. & Carlene Lamade 

Bingaman 
Kenneth F. Erdley 
Daniel O. Hoy 
-Mary Ann Bingaman Kleintop 
Harry F. Kocher Jr. 
Carol Cornelius Lamb 
Wayne E. Miller 
Ruth Scott Nunn 
Ignatius J. Purta 
Franklin G. Smith 

1956 

Claire Rosengarten Albert 
Charles S. Bailes 
Evelyn Herbstrith Baker 
J. Edward Barrett 
-John C. & Charlotte Meerbach 
Bunke 
Charlotte Sandt Erdley 
Marjorie Kostenbauder Finley 
Clyde R. Kauffman 
Betsy Shirk Kirchner 
Nancy L. Kline 
Anna Jane Moyer 
Patricia Sipe Seasholtz 
Joanne Mummert Spangler 
Margaret Brady Wyllie 
John D. & Janet Gerner Yeich 

1957 

-Lynn Hassinger Askew 
-Nelson E. Bailey 

Jack K. Bishop 

Ronald E. Fouche 

Jane Longenecker Grim 

Park H. Haussler 

Helen Thomas Heilman 

Dwight A. Huseman 
-Earl F. Kleintop 

Peter M. Nunn 

Nancy Lee Forrest Peel 

George H. Pospisil 

Martha McNitt Runkle 

George F. Schluchterer III 

Dorothy Wardle Spencer 

Patricia A. Walker 
-Erhard O. Werner 



1969 



21 



(958 

Robert T. Artz 

William R. & Carolann Zust 

Aspray 
Alan T. & Patricia Dawn Bortle 
Fred J. Chrvala 
Baird E. Collins 
Mary Lou Ernst 
Burdell S. Faust 
Louis J. Heinze 
Wade L. Hoffman 
Doris Keener Holcomb 
Vernon V. Hoover 
Alice Ann Patterson 
Janice Paul 
Joan A. Richie 

Wayne W. & Janet Gordon Rutz 
Janice Quigley Schluchterer 7 C 
James L. Seasholtz 
Edward C. Shore 
Lee Erholm Smith 
Mary E. Souden 

James W. & Gail Woolbert White 
Robert & Gloria Myers Willauer 
-James W. Wright 

1959 

-Ronald G. Aller 

Nancy Rae Altland 

James T. Bayruns 

Carol Royer Caddell 
-Jack E. Cisney 

Robert L. Fiscus 

Denece Newhard Haussler 

Jonathan B. Haussler 

Barbara Tongue Herold 

Dorald L. Middlesworth 

Richard A. & Margaret Pattyson 
Neff 

Susan Lehman Northrup 

Joseph & Sandra Meyer Osinchak 

Peter Paul & Mary Walker Pace 

Mary-Margaret Overly Peraro 

Eleanor K. Pourron 

Sidney F. Richard 

Margaret Burns Rovendro 

Lester E. Rudisill 

Anne Reynolds Thomas 

Clyde H. Wood 

Ray Jay Yeingst 

1960 

Joseph S. Aleknavage 
Joan Heslop Bayruns 
Caroline Shryrock Conrad 
Brian L. Donley 
Sandra Kimmel Huseman 
Edith Parr Koenighaus 
Lillian Holcombe Martin 
Sara L. McCahan 
Pricilla Lantz McNitt 
-James R. Middleswarth 
Stephanie Haase Moore 
Richard D. Reichard 
Allen I. Rowe 
Cleone Hohman Rudisill 
Willi K. E. Weichelt 
Larry A. Wingard 

1961 

-Barbara Angle Aller 
-Gilbert C. Askew 

Lee R. Conrad 

Sandra Schell Deen 

Richard L. Fausey 

Linda Traub Fiscus 

Jane Reichenbach Geuder 

Thomas P. Helvig 

Linda Leonard 

Paul A. Martin 

Gary L. Moore 

Janice Conway Niemann 
-Nancy Davis Raab 

Sandra Brandt Richard 

1962 

-Elizabeth Hodges Bagger 

Leslie R. Butler 

Philip M. Clark 

Carl H. Hitchner 

Nathan A. Kale 

Maria Wernikowski Macfarlan 

Judith Arnold Mclntyre 
-Jean Ewald Middleswarth 
-John H. Raab 

Joyce Sheesley Shirey 

Robert A. Smith 

John H. Spillman 

Susan Turnbach Steigerwalt 

Susan Sload Thompson 

Lois Master Van Zanten 

Audrey Kellert Yeingst 

E. Michael Yohe 



1963 

-Curtis W. Barry 

James C. & Carol Gresh Black 
-Robert W. Curtis 

Barbara A. Deroba 

Patricia Estep Dysart 

James R. Gallagher 
-Sally Stephenson Gibney 

Pamela Terry Gordon 

Naomi Weaver Grondahl 

George W. Kindon III 

Joe W. Kleinbauer 

Carol Marburger Koch 

Peter H. Kuebler 

Lynn E. Lerew 

Joyce Lundy 

Clark R. Mosier 

Carl M. Moyer 

Mary Elizabeth Brown Murray =£° c 

James Perot 

Kay M. Potts 

Carol Shesler Rowe 

Anita Ruhling Sapp 

Irene Etter Schmehl 

Samuel R. Shirey 

Sandra K. Sholley 

Georgiann Brodisch Skinner 

Linda Leach Spillman 

Robert J. Summer Ml 

Rudolph J. Van der Hiel 

H. Nathan Ward 

Janet H. White 

1964 

Alfred A. Ambrose 
Alan Bachrach Jr. 
Brian C. Bolig 
M. Jane Gelnett 
Kenneth E. Gordon 
Albert W. Grondahl 
Judy Polhemus Hawkes 
Ronald C. Hendrix 
Fred G. Hershey 
Lloyd R. Hettenbach 
Harvey A. Horowitz 
Richard E. Howe Jr. 
Grace Simington Karschner 
Pamela J. Kay 
George A. Kirchner 
-Lynn Pfister Knight 
Judith Tuma Kuebler 
William E. Lindsay 
Marian Houser Main 
Dorothy Canfield Marshall 
Joseph 1116- Arlene Roberts 

O'Hara 
Robert R. Richards Jr. 
Michael E. Rupprecht 
Patricia Taylor Schmidt 
Richard A. & Susan Chapman 

Seaks 
Ann R, Siple 
James M. Skinner 
Ann Latimer Strate 
Harry C. Strine III 
Sandra M. Troutman 
H. William Vought Jr. 
Marjorie Brandt Waltman 
Vicki Lawler Yohe 

1965 

Barry Bence 

Stacey L. Bottiger 

Arthur F. Bowen 

Jerold C. Burch 

Nancy Corson Carter 

James H. Caulfield 

Barbara Ann Chew 

Linda Cole Conine 
-Lewis H. Darr 

Ray E. Dice 

Paul W. Ernst 

Muriel Hartline Folk 

Lawrence J. Galley 
-James A. Gibney 
-John F. Grebe 

Richard W. Hafer 

Robert K. Hamme 

Cortland M. Hatfield 

Karen Seifried Hendrix 

Harold J. Hershey 

Bonita Schaffer Hettenbach 
-Bonnie Lea Johnson 

Mary Lou West Johnson 

Richard S. Karschner 

Carol Cox Kirchner 

Alan Krichev 

Milton M. Kuhn 

Carolyn Tweed Leap 

Richard E. Under 

Sally Schnure Lindsay 

Benjamin H. Lovell 

Robert W. Lytle 



-Milton H. Maslin Jr. 
-Seward Prosser & Karen Boyd 
Mellon 

Richard B. Meserole 

Thomas L. Myers 

Jean Price 

Francis I. Ray 

Bonnie Bucks Reece 

Eric L. Reichley 

Douglas L. Reynolds 

Adele Breese Richards 

Daniel R. Seyss 

Gaye Wolcott Sheffler 

Lee K. Smith 

Leila Bruno Stump 

Gail L. Tillman 

Henry D. Van Dine 

David M. Wilkinson 



1966 

Samuel R. & Mary Lee Andrews t 

Charles L. Bailey Jr. 

Timothy R. Barnes 

Larry D. & Priscilla Clark 

Bashore 
Georgia Fegley Boyer 
Nancylee Cranmer 
-Ann McAuliffe Darr 
Richard D. & Elizabeth Braun 

Davidson 
Harold A. Freed 
Wayne H. Fisher 
Brenda K. Gerhart 
Gretchen Gochnour 
Robert W. Goddard 
James W. Good 
Ruth E. Keener 
Carol Shupe Keyser 
Myrna Lee 
Robert J. Luth 
Susann McAuliffe 
Joan L. Meisenhelter 
Laura Estep Melendez 
John J. Menapace 
Marilyn Moltu 
Janice H. O'Donnell 
Richard A. Pawloski 
Michael P. & Dorothy Wiesman 

Rauch 
Gregory J. Reiff 
Suzanne Ruth Springer 
Richard E. & Magaret Oelkers 

Talbot 
Carole Summer Ward 

1967 

J. Robert Arthur 
Reynold L. Badman 
Nancy Baker 
Charles S. Bender II 
Ellen Comey Bennett 
Cherry Appleton Berlanda 
Walter H. Biedermann 
George K. Brommer Jr. 
Bruce S. & Janet McAfee Brown 
Edward E. Brown 
Donna Ake Burkholder 
Jack R. Campbell 
M. Donald Cave 
Cynthia D. Culp 
Bonnie J. Cutler 
Eleanore M. Finnegan 
Patricia Craig Galley 
Penney Graham 
-Carole Sloan Grebe 
Carolyn Ruocco Grimes 
Maryann Paylor Grube 
Jennifer Hawley Hamme 
Karen H. Hardy 
Richard B. Hess 
Richard R. & Rosemary Robinson 

Hough 
Barbara Ann Kaufmann 
John D. Jr. & Andrea Schumann 

Keim 
William D. Kramer 
D. Alan Lenig 
Donald C. Lindenmuth 
Raymond J. & Carolyn Evans 

Mach 
Frank D Marsh 
Robert R. Jr. & Carolyn Wahler 

Miller 
Couldron P. Mitchell 
Diane Heller Nixon 
Nancy V. Orr 
Diane Hillegass Pawloski 
Clowie McLaughlin Reiff 
Janet Schumacher Reynolds 
Gary R. Seifert 
Marion L, Shatto 
Marijane Snyder 
Robert C. Snyder 



John J. Stankiewicz 
Roger G. Van Deroef 
Margaret Shields Weidner 

1968 

Katherine W. Beard 

David P. Bingaman 

Barbara J. Brought 

Kathleen L. Blunt 

Elizabeth A. Charles 

Barbara J. Dick 

Arthur D. Ebersberger 

Ruth A. Flanders 

Janet K. Fowler 

H. Donald Glaser Jr. 

Lester E. Goodman II 

Willard M. Grimes III 

Andrew N. Grover 

Samuel V. Halpern 

Gwen A. Hennef6rfh r 
&° Mary Anna Ingram \0^ 

Chnsta J. Jorgensen 

John Frederick Lehr 

Mallory Storer Lenig 

David G. Lomison 

Charles H. McLeskey 

Christine Kelly Migliaccio 

Gerald J . Miskar 

Donald P. & Mary Ann Carpenter 
Orso 

Nancy Rosengarten Palmer 

Mary Elizabeth Reichner 

Nancy A. Rickenbaugh 

E. Ellen Rogers 

Laura E. Scaife 

Kenneth R. & Betsy Klose 
Selinger 

Ann M. Sheppard 

Jeffrey P. Spencer 

Catherine L. Strese 

Marsha M. Tamke 

Joan E. Vondercrone 

Nan Weller 
• Susan L. Wershing 

Ralph G. Ziegler 

1969 

Sharon L. Bankert 

Gerald L. Book 

David C. Botts 

John C. Brill 

Virginia A. Carlson 

Peter W. Delin 

David M. Dumeyer 

Thomas C. Eggleston Ml 

Deborah L. Felmlee 

Beverly Gillette 

David N. Grubb 

Nancy E. Haas 

David L. Hesel 

Shirley R. Jones 

Elizabeth Elmer Kaufmann 

Paulette M. Keller 

Margaret Heil King 

Glenn E. & Beth Runk Ludwig 

Davis W. Plummer Jr. 

Christine J. Richards 

Richard F. Saylor Jr. 

Carol L. Smith 

Bronwyn E. Tippett 

Frank J. Trembulak 

John R. Whisler 

Julie B. Stauffer 



* W 



1970 ,p 

Diane Burgee Packer ' ' i- t 



PARENTS AND FRIENDS 

Mr. & Mrs. Alvah B. Adams 

Clifford J. Alberga 

Frances Dunlap Alterman \N C-A 

-John A. Apple hc'64 
Mr. & Mrs. John V. Artz 
Mr. & Mrs. Richie Ashburn 
Mr. & Mrs. Perry Bascom 
H, M. Bice 

Mr. & Mrs. Mahlon Z. Bierly 
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth E. Boehm 

-Henry Borchardt 

-Mr. & Mrs Raymond C. Bowen 
Robert L. Bradford vo A 
James F. Bradley 
Anne & Russell Brosius 
Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Brown 
--William R. Burchfield 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles Burns 
E. S. Byrd Jr. 



22 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Mr. & Mrs. Charles S. Cady 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert E. Carman 
*John A. Carpenter 

William L. Clark 
"'Mr. & Mrs. Roger W. CMpp 
=::#Theron D. Conrad 

Carol E. Conway 

Chester S. Crawford 

Mr. & Mrs. Homer B. Davis 

Mr. & Mrs. James M. DeCaro 
*Mr. & Mrs. G. Rudolph Dechert 

Mrs. John DeFriest 

Mr. & Mrs. Vincent P. DePillo 

Nona M. Diehl hc'49 

William F. Drake 

George R. Dunham 

Mr. & Mrs. William G. Eissler 

Margaret S. Ernst hew tifi 

Thomas Etzweiler 

Eleanor M. Faragalli 

Edmond J. Farrell 

Mr. & Mrs. W. Claude Faust 

Mr. & Mrs. George W. Finley 
-'Shelton Fisher hc'68 
-'Verna M. Fisher 

Joseph B. Flotten^Cfl 
*Wilbert R. Forse 

Mr. & Mrs. P. Elliott Fouts Jr. 
'••'Walter B. Freed 

Mr. & Mrs. John E. Freeman Jr. 

Patricia Fresk 

Jack W. Fritz 

Mr. & Mrs. Peter F. Gallagher 
*Gynith C. Giffintofl* 
'"'Russell W. Gilbert y\ort 
,; 'Mr. & Mrs. H. Donald Glaser 

Bernard B. Goldner 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter E. Goodman 
j;f Mrs. Katherine Goodspeed 

Gerald R. Gordon V\o<\ 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. Gorman 

Mrs. James H. Goss 

Neale & Jackie Gow 
#lrvin Graybill rov\ 

Mr. & Mrs. George F. Grebe 

Mr. & Mrs. Fred A. GrosseAO* 
*Mr. & Mrs. Victor Grover 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul I. Guest 

T. O. Haas 
- ; *Harry H. Haddon hc'63 
*- ! Mary L. Haggerty 

Mr. & Mrs. P. G. Hamelin 

Mr. & Mrs. John C. Harlan 

Donald R. & Susan Holt Hartter 

Pauline R. Hauke 
*H. H. Haverstick 

Robert A. Hemm 

James C. Hirsch 

Dr. & Mrs. James M. Hofford 
*Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth L. Holtzapple 
**John C. Horn hc'65 
**0. W. Houts 

Mr. & Mrs. Carmine lannucci 

Mrs. Anthony Infantino 
*Mr. & Mrs. J. A. Ingram 

Arthur H. James hc'27 
*Mr. & Mrs. Roger H. Johnson 
::: R. M. Johnston (Deceased) 

Bradford S. Jones 

Mr. & Mrs. William E. Jones Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. William E. Jones Jr. 
:;: Hilda KarnioUpj, 

Mr. & Mrs. Carl F. Kenneck 

Grace S. Kenny 

Paul J. Kirsch 

Mr. & Mrs. W. L. Kirschner 

Mr. & Mrs. Lewis Klein 

Athalia T. Kline ^5<\ 

George A. Koehler 
-Mrs. Bernard W. Krapf 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert H. LaFrance 

Sandra R. Laiken 

C. Edward Land 
**Eleanor Robison LandesY^ '^ 

Mr, & Mrs. Joseph Laskowski 

J. Roy & Pauline LauverV\Cfl 

Charles Leese 
-'Mr. & Mrs. Stanford I. M. Lehr 
*#j_ Edward Lenker 

Vernon E. Leslie hc'67 

Mr. & Mrs. Louise Levitt 

Mr. & Mrs. John H. Lippincott Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerre H. Lieberman 

Mr. & Mrs. John J. Lohrman 

Sharon MacWilliams 

Mr & Mrs. Kenneth F. Mailloux AGTt 

Francis Martin 

Raymond S. Martin Jr. 

Richard Martin 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard W. 
Maschmeier 

Mr. & Mrs. Sam P. Mastro 

Mr. & Mrs. Gene Mauch 

W. E. McClenahan 

Eugene McCurdy 

David L. McGahey 



MEMORIALS 
AND HONORARY GIFTS 

During 1968-69 a number of memorial gifts were 
received in the names of : 

Mrs. Joseph B. Flotten 
The Rev. James H. Goss '21 
Paul L. Hauke '26 
Ethel Weikert Reuning '29 
William M. Schnure x'99 
Clyde R. Spitzner '37 

Contributions also were made in honor of: 
Guy M. Bogar '21 
W. Alfred Streamer '26 



-'Daniel McGowan V\«;? 

John B. McNamee 

Mr. & Mrs. Bruce W. Melendy 

Helen P. Miller 

Mr. & Mrs. William G. Mulvey 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard Murray 

Mr. & Mrs. Lee Neal 
-'Edmund C. Newton 
*Charles A. Nicely V\(jV\ 

W. Wallace Orr Jr. 

Mrs. W. W. Orr 
-Mr. & Mrs. Wesley A. Orth 
-Phillips Motel 

Mr, & Mrs. Edward J. Phillips 
-'^Joseph L. Ray i^/i 
'•-'Robert Redpath 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Reeves 

Mr. & Mrs. E. S. Reighard 

Otto Reimherr^p 

--Harold H. Reuning \*j,i 

-Wilhelm Reuning <' 

Mr. & Mrs. Alfred P. Rexford 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry E. Rhea 

Mr. & Mrs. Jack E. Rodgers 

J. G. Rose Jr. 
-H. W. Rozenberg 
-'Wanda C. Scharfe 

John C. Scheuer 
-'Glenn E. Shaffer Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Burton J. Sherwood 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Shields 
-Daniel Shuck 
-'Carl Simon 

Mr. & Mrs. W. E. Simpson 

Mr. & Mrs. Jack M. Smith 

Jay B. Sondheim 

Ruth Miller Steese hc'33 
-'Mr. & Mrs. Leon L. Steinberg 
^Catherine E. SteltzV>cfl 

Anna J. Stevens 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth W. Stowman 
-'George R. F. Tamke V J * 

Dr. & Mrs. John Y. Templeton 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Teter 

Cedric W. Tilberg hc'63 

Mr. & Mrs. Floyd L. Tompkins 
"'Bertha Townsend ^ * 

Mr. & Mrs. W. T. Tredennick 

Betsy & Howard Uphouse 

Mr. & Mrs. James Van de Velde 
**Katherine M Vastine (Estate) 
*Mr. & Mrs. Earl C. Walck 
*Mr. & Mrs. G. Edward Walhs 

Mr. & Mrs. E. Gordon Walls 

H. E. Walpert 



*Norman E. Walz u,- 

**Alan R. Warehime 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Weaver 
,; " :< Gustave W. Weber ^tii 
Mae E. Wentzel 
Marvin J. Wentzel 
Mr. & Mrs. Fred R. Wentzel 
*Mr. & Mrs. Helmut O. Werner 
Lewis D. Wetzel 
Mr. & Mrs. Todd T. Wheeler 
Mr. & Mrs. John H. Williams 
*Mr. & Mrs. Truxton T. Williams 
Mr. & Mrs. Alexander J. 

Williamson 
Morton H. Wilner 
*Mr. & Mrs. Walter E. 

Wireback Jr. 
■ f hAr. & Mrs. E. E. Wissinger 

Efrem Zimbalist Jr. hc'66 
-Charles B. Zimmerman 'hc50 



CORPORATIONS, CORPORA- 
TION FOUNDATIONS, 
FOUNDATIONS 

**Alcan Cable Corp. 

American Broadcasting Co. 
-*Annenberg Fund 
Atlantic Richfield Co. 
"^Baltimore Paint & Chemical Corp. 
** Bethlehem Steel Corp. 
*John Blair & Co. 
Blair TV-Blair Radio 
**Butter Krust Baking Co. 
^Connecticut Mutual Life 
**J. C. Decker Co. 

Dun & Bradstreet Foundation 
**Ernst & Ernst 
**S. H. Evert Co., Inc. 

Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. 
**First National Bank of Sunbury 

*Ford Motor Co. 
•"^Foundation for Independent 
Colleges, Inc. 
"'Albert F. Goetze Foundation 
**Grit Publishing Co. 
*Gulf Oil Corp. 
#The Hershey Fund 
'•'Holiday Inn 
'•■Household Finance Foundation 



IBM Corp. 
IBM World Trade 
Insurance Co. of North America 
-Janitor Supply House, Harrisburg 
*C. F. King, Inc. 
G. R. Kinney Foundation, Inc. 
J. M. Korn & Son, Inc. 
:;;,;t Mary Macintosh Services 

-McGraw-Hill, Inc. 
--Middlecreek Paving, Inc. 
-Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. of 

N.Y. 
-Mutual of N.Y. 
■^-National Institute of Health 

-'Nationwide Foundation 
--National Science Foundation 
New York Times Foundation 
Pacific & Southern Broadcasting 

Co. 
Pennsylvania Association of 

Broadcasters 
Pennsylvania Banking & Trust, 
Philadelphia 
--Pennsylvania Power & Light Co. 
Pepsi Cola Inc. 
Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 
Philadelphia National League Club 
Pittsburgh National Bank 
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. 
-Presser Foundation 
--The Prudential Insurance Co. of 

America 
--Price Waterhouse & Co. 
Public Service Electric & Gas 
,;< Schering Foundation 
:;c Sears, Roebuck Foundation 
Sinclair Oil Corp. 
**Snyder County Trust Co., 

Selinsgrove 
>: ' :;c Stackpole Carbon Co. 
**Sunbury Rotary Club 

Sun Oil Co. 
'^Swineford National Bank, 
Middleburg, Pa. 
Textron Foundation, Inc. 
TV Bureau of Advertising, Inc. 
-*Tri County National Bank 

-'Triangle Stations 
**U. S. Office of Education 

*U. S. Trust Co. of N.Y, 
**Weis Markets, Inc. 
:: ' :: Margaret Wendt Foundation 
Westinghouse Educational 
Foundation 
*WFIL Radio & TV 
**WFIL Radio 

Williamsport Paper Co. 

WNBF 

WNHC Radio & TV 



CHURCHES AND 
ORGANIZATIONS 

' ;: Alpha Phi Omega 
Beta Alpha Chapter of Pi 
Kappa Alpha 
*Beta Sigma Phi, Selinsgrove 
--'Central Pennsylvania Synod, 

Lutheran Church in America 
* -'Class of 1969 
-'-Evangelical Lutheran Church, 

Hershey, Pa. 
--First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 
Selinsgrove 
-'Freeburg (Pa.) Lutheran Church 
-'-'Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 

Hershey, Pa. 
**Kiwanis of Sunbury 
--'Lutheran Church in America 
Manasquan (N.J.) Public Library 
-'North Jersey Susquehanna 
University Alumni Club 
*Rotary Club of Selinsgrove 
St. Peter Lutheran Church 
Lancaster, Pa. 
-'-Sunbury Kiwanis Foundation 
-'-'Sunbury Rotary Club 
^'Susquehanna University Alumni 
Club, Philadelphia Chapter 
Trinity Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, Shamokin, Pa. 
*#Trinity Lutheran Church, 

Selinsgrove 
-'-'Women's Auxiliary of 

Susquehanna University 
,; " ; 'Zion Lutheran Church, 
Harrisburg 
-'Zion Lutheran Church, 
Johnstown, Pa. 
!;;5; 'Zion Lutheran Church, 
Sunbury, Pa. 



SUMMER 1969 



23 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 




POSTMASTER: Please notify if undelivered. 

Entered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 

Post Office as Second Class matter. 



31;/ 



FALL 1969 



Susquehanna Alumnus 





Preparing for their European Concert Tour 
next summer, members of the Susquehanna 
Band and Choir are doing all kinds of odd 
jobs to help pay their way. One project is the 
sale of souvenir recordings by both groups. 
Interested? Write for details to: Mr. Robert 
Summer, Department of Music, Susquehanna 
University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 



The decade of the '60s has seen pro- 
found changes take place on the Ameri- 
can college campus. The search for 
truth and knowledge no longer goes on 
primarily behind ivy-covered walls; it 
seems to be everywhere at once. The 
students are impatient — some are so im- 
patient that in their headlong rush they 
are stepping on others. In some places 
there has been violence and this has 
received public attention. 

But at the vast majority of colleges 
there has been no violence, none of the 
kind of public dissent which attracts 
wide attention. The impatience is there 
all the same, but reason prevails. 

The articles beginning on pages 4 and 
12 provide some insight into the con- 
cerns of today's college students. We 
believe they will help our readers to see 
"how things are" as we enter the '70s. 

Several names were inadvertently 
omitted from the list of 1968-69 donors 
to Susquehanna University, published in 
our last issue: 

Parke R. Wagner '26 

Essex Botsford Wagner '28 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Scharfe '31 

Glenn L. Musser '41 



The cover: Tyler To McCants was the 
most effective passing combination Sus- 
quehanna has had since the early '50s. 
Read SU Sports, page 26. 



Vol. 39 



FALL 1969 



No. 1 



CONTENTS 



What Are They Thinking? 



That Pet Word 



Homecoming: A Near-Perfect Day 



Susquehannans On Parade 



12 



16 



21 



SU Sports 26 

by Ron Berkheimer 

Advanced Degrees 29 

"I Do" 31 

Born Crusaders 36 

Deaths 37 



Directory of Officers 1969-70 



39 




Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writers 

RONALD E. BERKHEIMER 

MARGARET F. ERNST 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Pub- 
lished four times a year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



FALL 1969 



Many college students are thinking differently 
these days from the way college students thought 
20 years ago, or 10, or even 2. And they're 
speaking out. In trying to understand what they 
are thinking, the rest of us must first listen to 
what they are saying. These are excerpts from 
recent statements by four seniors who are student 
leaders at Susquehanna, and by two observers of 
the current scene who visited the campus this fall. 



What 




Lovell 



'LL, Alan C, Silver Spring. Md., 
political science major 
President of Student Government, 
reporting on activities in J 968-69 

This probably has been the most turbulent year in 
American higher education, a year in which students 
and their institutions have clashed on the problem 
of campus tension over the growing student desire 
for a freer, more democratic university. 

Violence in unprecedented doses has shaken 
scores of campuses; the resulting anger and toler- 
ance of college administrators and alumni are mo- 
tivated only by the deep frustrations and impatience 
of students demanding institutional change. 

The main force that buffets the campuses of 
today is not new: student discontent with the ade- 



quacy and relevance of our learning experience. We, 
as students, as administrators, and even as alumni, 
are now challenged to declare candidly and clearly 
our commitments, our priorities, our loyalties. This 
has been the goal of the Student Government As- 
sociation of Susquehanna University this past year. 

The theme of the Association's programs has 
been involvement. We have become involved first 
with the academic area of our institution. Students 
now sit on faculty committees. Students at Susque- 
hanna realize that courses and the school calendar 
need to be constantly reevaluated. New courses must 
be added and other courses dropped. It is time for 
everyone to realize that the academic program of 
our University is our strongest selling point, and we 
must constantly strive to improve it. 

Students are now given permission to sit in on 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Are They Thinking? 



Board meetings. Students are interested, I believe, 
and responsible enough to help make some of the 
decisions of the University. It is now time for Board 
members to listen to students and to discuss frankly 
with students some of the issues which go before 
the Board. 

Throughout this past year. Senate has tried to 
present constructive proposals. Compulsory chapel 
has been replaced with a weekly voluntary chapel 
service and an academic convocation on a monthly 
basis. A new dress code has been established that 
permits students to wear regular school dress to all 
meals except Sunday noon. Hours and sign-out pro- 
cedure for women have been liberalized. Sophomores 
are now permitted to have cars on campus and 
students on probation and academic warning are no 
longer restricted to one extracurricular activity. Stu- 
dents are now represented on most University com- 
mittees and their voice is being heard in the long- 
range planning of the University. However, more 
work needs to be done to update our rules and regu- 
lations. 

There are major areas to be improved; and I 
believe this improvement must be accomplished im- 
mediately. One thing must be said at this point: the 
major reason for the lack of damaging protest on 
our campus has been the administration's coopera- 
tion with the Student Government Association's of- 
ficers in frank discussion of major issues. This must 
be continued if we are to progress the way we have. 
To vie with one another would only destroy the 
progress we have achieved and hinder any progress 
we hope to achieve in the future. 

It is time for all aspects of the University, in- 
cluding the alumni, to become involved and inter- 
ested in the affairs of the University. Our major 



priority must be to strengthen our academic pro- 
gram. We must then continue to build the needed 
buildings, stressing the library, gymnasium, and the 
new dormitory. Students feel that a new gym is a 
necessity and plans must get underway as soon as 
possible for this important addition to our campus. 
In addition, our student body must become more 
diversified, rising tuition costs must be curbed, and 
scholarships and grants-in-aid must continue to 
grow as our student body grows. 



HERRINGTON, Anne J., Troy, Pa., 
English major 

Remarks to the S.U. Advisory Council, 
September 19 

The most beautiful and important thing about Sus- 
quehanna is not its buildings, nor is it our green 
campus — it is rather the people who compose this 
community. And in the rush of everyday adminis- 
trative duties, exam-taking and fund-raising, one 
should not forget that all else is secondary to these 
individuals — the faculty, administration, students, 
and alumni. It is only as each of us learns to feel 
an integral part of this experiment in learning and 
living that Susquehanna will become and remain an 
exciting, a rewarding, a unique experience that exists 
only as all of us exist together. But we are at a 
disadvantage already because in most cases the only 
contact which students have with alumni is at 
planned, more formal functions such as these. While 
meetings are profitable and we are always honored 
to meet with you, it might be good if each of you 
could casually visit campus some day — maybe sit 



FALL 1969 



in on a class and chat with a few random students 
in the Campus Center. I think all of us would have 
a better appreciation then of the continuum in the 
life-stream of people which is Susquehanna. 

With a student enrollment of 1200 and a fac- 
ulty-student ratio of 1:12, we have a distinct advan- 
tage over the larger universities. Students do not face 
the anonymity here that would be their fate at a 
multiversity. And they have every opportunity for 
encountering their professors both in and out of the 
classroom. Everyone is infinitely more approachable 
and is not so easily lost in the cold rush of business 
as usual at a massive institution. It is very difficult 
to hide in your room or behind a number for four 
years at a school our size. At some point each of us 
is drawn into being a realized person. And I feel it 
is essential to Susquehanna to remain small in order 
to keep this favorable position. 

Susquehanna is a private college. To become 
a state institution would irrevocably alter the nature 
of Susquehanna. State schools cannot now keep up 
with their own growth. In the rush of erecting 
buildings, increasing enrollment, and producing that 
interesting package known as the "educated person" 
they have almost forgotten that it is the individuals 
who constitute a college and give it its identity, and 
that the process of learning is a mutual quest shared 
between student and professor. Susquehanna as a 
small, private university has kept its identity. 

Susquehanna has another distinct advantage in 
that it is flexible to the needs of its people. . . . Just 
in the three years that I've been on campus much 
has been done by administrators and faculty to 
share responsibility with students. But we should 

Herrington 




go further with this venture. The more a person is 
trusted to share in making a human experience such 
as a university, a success, the more they are likely 
to contribute in ideas, work, and enthusiasm and 
the more they are likely to feel a close identification 
with that school. 

I strongly support two primary long-range goals 
urged by the ad hoc committee: 1 ) ". . . top priority 
must remain with teaching and on the continued re- 
cruitment of good teacher-scholars. Realizing that 
Susquehanna's future appeal to prospective students 
lies in the College's ability to attract teachers who 
can and will communicate with students, we must 
be ready to increase the average faculty salary from 
$10,000 to $15,000 by 1975. This must be the 
primary educational goal during the years ahead. 
To lose sight of this priority will be to forfeit Sus- 
quehanna's chances of future success as an educa- 
tional institution." 2) "Emphasis must be placed on 
maintaining and if possible increasing the percent- 
age of financial aid awarded to students. Presently, 
40 percent of the student body receive some form of 
this aid. And if Susquehanna hopes, as it should, 
to attract quality students regardless of their socio- 
economic backgrounds, then this aid should increase 
with the student costs. For Susquehanna to be aca- 
demically and socially responsive to the needs of 
our time, it must beware becoming a school for only 
the rich." 



Linda G., York, Pa., 
French and English major 
Remarks to the S.U. Advisory Council, 
September 19 

College students today do not want just an educa- 
tion for a career, a classical education; they also 
want an education for life, for living. They want a 
practical education. 

They are not content to be confined to a text- 
book education and after graduation to be thrust 
into a world with which they have had little contact 
for four years. 

It is vital, therefore, that colleges make the 
college experience and a college education relevant 
to the world today. There are two areas in which 
this must be done. 

First in the academic. Prospective teachers are 
given the opportunity during their four years to 
student teach. Accounting students serve a six- or 
eight-week internship with an outlying firm. But this 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Metzel 

is not enough. There must be an opportunity for 
more students to learn by doing, to have practical 
experience in their chosen field during their under- 
graduate work. With the Selinsgrove State School 
and Laurelton, as well as the home for old folks 
nearby and the community services in Sunbury, 
there would seem to be a great opportunity for a 
program for sociology and psychology majors. 

Although this is not a great industrial area, it 
seems feasible that some internship program could 
be established with outlying industries for chemistry 
and physics majors. 

But because we are not so located that stu- 
dents of all majors can have such experience during 
the nine-month semester plan, perhaps it is neces- 
sary that we consider a calendar change that would 
allow free time for all students to go wherever neces- 
sary to work in their individual areas. Calendar 
arrangements such as the 4-1-4 program allow stu- 
dents four months of study, one month for such a 
program, and another four months of study. 

Another area that must be developed is that 
of summer work related to a student's chosen field. 



. . . The Music Department is attempting to develop 
a program for students to teach in the inner city 
during the summer as part of their student-teaching 
experience. 

The second area that must be developed is the 
co-curricular. There must be more opportunity for 
community involvement, for relating to the outside 
world during the college years. Today, more than 
ever, students are concerned with humanity, with 
the social ills. They want to get involved now. 

Our strategic location in a deprived rural area 
has fostered a volunteer tutoring program for under- 
privileged children. Just begun in February, 1969, 
it has tremendous possibilities. This year the pro- 
gram is expanding to provide students to supervise 
retarded children in the pool of the YMCA in Sun- 
bury. Hopefully, if the funds can be obtained, this 
program can be expanded even more to bring these 
underprivileged children to campus for plays, con- 
certs, and other cultural events. The State School, 
the Migrant Camp, and the coming Recreation Cen- 
ter also offer opportunities for community involve- 
ment whether or not it is in one's chosen field. 

The development of such academic and co- 
curricular programs requires the involvement, the 
motivation of administration, but more important, 
of professors. It is imperative that professors closely 
examine their courses and structure them so that 
they will be relevant, so that they will offer oppor- 
tunities for experience and involvement. 

When education is relevant, students will be 
motivated. When education is relevant, students 
will be prepared for life as well as for a career. 
You, as alumni who have established yourselves in 
community and profession, can help Susquehanna 
offer a more relevant education. 



MOYER, Ray A., Lewisburg, Pa., 

music education major 

Remarks to the S.U. Advisory Council, 

September 19 

Most people have some degree of image conscious- 
ness — they know what is expected of them within a 
given role and other people know what to expect 
of them. Serious problems arise when people do 
not follow the image that is socially prescribed for 
them. For instance, teachers aren't supposed to 
strike, but they do and it bothers us. 

Serious problems also arise when students out- 
grow their prescribed images. Parents see their 



FALL 1969 




Mover 



children as more intelligent at a given age than 
they were at the same age, but still lacking experi- 
ence and the ensuing wisdom which would enable 
them to make constructive criticism of and to 
society. 

Teachers often see students as academic neo- 
phytes lacking the educational credentials prerequi- 
site to serious consideration. Student criticism of a 
course is taken as either a personal affront or an 
implication that the student himself could do better 
or that the professor doesn't know his subject. 

Means and standards of communication are 
also a serious problem. Everyone is influenced by 
standards of procedure, protocol, verbal diplomacy, 
and euphemisms. We analyze what people say to 
discover what they really mean. It's a way of life. 
Then young people come along and point out 
problems, weaknesses, foibles, and hypocrisies — not 
in the preferred subtle whisper which falls on deaf 
ears, but screamed out at mass rallies which are 
dutifully reported by the major news media. 

The refusal of students to observe their un- 
written but widely expected roles is taken as proof 



of the impertinence, immaturity, and irresponsibility 
of youth. In this case immaturity and irresponsibility 
mean doing something other than what is expected. 
This was once called individuality — a relatively 
harmless affliction often associated with eccentricity. 
The switch of labels applies a social sanction which 
not only condemns the deviants, but keeps any 
fence straddlers or weak links in line. 

What is needed is a willingness to reassess and 
revise present attitudes toward young people. The 
futility of the old attitudes has been proven too 
many times. A new attitude must show that young 
people are maturing faster, that they are growing in 
social sensitivity and desire and ability to partici- 
pate. It must also show that they will fight for what 
they believe in, as people have always done. 

This is clearly an Era of Social Protest and the 
youth are not the only social iconoclasts. Blacks are 
moving toward civil rights, union workers (including 
teachers) are getting raises, members of religious 
orders are receiving more personal freedom, house- 
wives are boycotting stores in order to lower prices 
and students are getting an effective voice in uni- 
versity affairs and the strength is being felt in politi- 
cal decisions. 

The participants are different, but the methods 
and results are the same: through civil disturbances, 
people are getting what they want. I don't believe 
for a second and neither do any of these groups 
believe that they would have gotten anything if they 
hadn't protested loud, long and hard. More im- 
portantly, other people who have thus far remained 
peaceful are figuring that they aren't going to get 
what they want unless they protest as strongly as 
everyone else. Stepping on them with police won't 
work. This approach hasn't worked in our penal 
system and it certainly won't work in our schools. 
Giving a free rein to everyone won't work either. 

I think that there are some viable options. 
Although students may seem as if they would like 
to rule everything, they basically want their ideas 
to count, to be represented. This is an awesome 
problem in politics, but not so in schools. Through 
the representative governing bodies of the university, 
student views must be represented. Their claim is 
to improve the university; they should have the op- 
portunity to try. If they succeed, their worth will 
have been proven to the benefit of everyone. If they 
fail, there is no further basis for protest. 

Second, there are certain student groups that 
destroy for the sake of destruction. Students must 
realize that they cannot assume that the intentions 
of all students are constructive just because they are 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



fellow students. These other groups must be isolated 
from the support of the remainder of the student 
body, because without this support they cannot sur- 
vive and their existence hinders the progress of 
everyone. The new image of youth must include 
responsibility as well as freedom and opportunity. 



Dr. Eric A., President 
of Pennsylvania State University 
S.U. Opening Convocation address, September 14 

Universities across the country are in for a tough 
time of it in the next few years and there are several 
reasons for this condition. This is not particularly 
because of the SDS, the BSM. or students who want 
to use four-letter words, but because there are some 
real cracks in Academia. 

One of the roots of the problem, I suspect, is 
that universities used to be ruled by a consensus, 
and by a spirit of friendship. Even those who dis- 
agreed completely, acted in the spirit of friendly 
enemies. Under this system, people who were con- 
cerned about decisions to be made by a university 
first helped each other dig out the facts as friends 
and not as adversaries. And they made sure that the 
facts were correct. They gathered all the facts avail- 
able, and they tested their reasoning on the way to 
an opinion, by explaining to others not just what 
their opinion was, but the reasoning by which they 
arrived at it. Others could see whether their opinions 
were based on facts. And gradually a consensus ap- 
peared, and if some people did not completely agree 
with the consensus, they at least had to agree that it 
was one arrived at rationally, without emotion, and 
by people who were equally in search of truth and 
knowledge. Therefore, they were willing to bow to 
that consensus, although they would still try to con- 
vince others — through fact and logic — to accept their 
way of thinking. 

As a matter of fact, this is the democratic way 
of doing things in the world outside the university 
also. Once a reasonable consensus had been reached, 
the decision applied to everyone and everyone agreed 
to this method. 

Today, however, this does not seem to be so. 
Numerous groups with a variety of opinions are not 
only claiming that they have a right to their opinions, 
but that their opinions should be followed no mat- 
ter what the majority says. And few attempts are 
made by many of these groups to find the facts or 
to retrace the arguments by which they reach their 




Walker 



conclusions. They feel that because they have 
reached a conclusion, they are entitled to this con- 
clusion — whether or not it is based on fact or logic. 

Reason is being replaced by noise, gentility by 
bad manners, and concern for the other man, by 
self interest. 

If this course is followed, then how does one 
follow the principles of democracy and the rule of 
the majority. Do you allow various groups to have 
their own way, even if the majority objects? 

Another problem is that we have for years, un- 
til recently, told students that they are too apathetic. 
We've told students that they ought to be not only 
concerned about the world, but they ought to do 
something about it. Now this statement has come 
back to haunt us, and although we haven't changed 
our minds about wanting students to do something 
about the world, we as educators forgot to say that 
you first have to know something about the world. 
Today, it seems to me, too many students accept 
the opinions of others without question, and driven 
by their emotions they arrive at their own opinions 
regardless of the facts. And having arrived at opin- 
ions, they seem to feel that this is basis enough for 
becoming active and urging their opinions on others. 

I also suspect that we as colleges are not do- 
ing as good a job of educating people as we used 



FALL 1969 



to do. We probably teach students more facts and 
we get more response from the student, but to me 
education is more than just knowing the facts. It is 
being able to reason from those facts and come up 
with a logical solution. In how many courses today 
do we teach students to reason? Very few. Now this 
used to be done in courses like geometry, algebra, 
physics, chemistry, logic, and so forth, and the 
examinations for these courses were tests which de- 
manded problem solving. But today we have a tend- 
ency to parade a lot of facts in front of the students 
and test them by yes or no quizzes to see how many 
of the facts they have remembered. But in such tests 
there aren't many actual problems to be solved, and 
there are few tests which involve lengthy and com- 
plex, step-by-step reasoning. 

Universities are also being faced with the prob- 
lem of how to go about encouraging the type of dis- 
sent that colleges need without encouraging the type 
of destructive rebellion we have seen. Educators 
want to encourage people to speak their minds freely, 
and we want to hear from those who think differ- 
ently from the majority — because frankly, this is 
where we get many of our good new ideas. We must 
remember it was people like Galileo, Copernicus, 
and Columbus who all had different ideas from those 
that were in vogue at the time. 

Students and faculty anywhere should have the 
right to peacefully picket and both should have the 
right to support unpopular causes, provided they do 
not interfere with the rights of others. . . . what 
our dissenters must remember is that no one has the 
right to compel anyone to listen to what is said, 
and no one has a right to intimidate others into 
following their ideas. 

The efficiency of our educating process does 
not seem to improve. Almost anything else we do, 
we improve our efficiency. We produce more steel, 
more coal, more automobiles, but we don't seem 
to produce more scholarship for man-hours worked. 
Though the idea of efficiency in education is repug- 
nant to some teachers, it is a concept which can no 
longer be swept under the rug. 

Where has been the increase in productivity in 
American education? The answer is that there has 
been very little. In higher education we are still 
teaching at the ratio of about 15 students for each 
faculty member, and using many methods that have 
long since been outmoded. Yet how much further 
can we go increasing the fraction of the GNP which 
goes into education? If education increases, what 
decreases? Health service? Welfare? Roads or Old 
Age Pensions? 



BOHR, Dr. Ronald H., Coordinator of 
Psycho-social research, Department of Research, 
Philadelphia State Hospital 
S.U. Convocation address, October 14 

The hospital is a complex social structure which 
elicits different types of behavior from those play- 
ing different roles within it. Furthermore, without 
looking at these roles from the inside it is often 
easy to overlook some of their most distinctive char- 
acteristics. The interacting groups within the hospital 
have different vested interests; these groups develop 
life styles and ideologies that are often sharply con- 
flicting. 

So it is with the college, another complex so- 
cial organization. There is less social distance in the 
college, for all teachers and administrators have at 
one time been students, whereas most hospital em- 
ployees have never been patients. And yet, because 
of the rapid social change which characterizes our 
society, the various interest groups involved are un- 
able to appreciate one another's unique problems. 
In particular, there is -a gross misunderstanding of 
the role of the college student of today — and a lack 
of awareness of how he sees his world. 

One major social change, felt today in the 
asylum and the academic world, as throughout the 
rest of society, is the rediscovery of the social di- 
mension of life. The young, in particular, have come 
to see hospitals or colleges — or, indeed, all of so- 
ciety — not as unified communities but rather as a 
collection of diverse interest groups. There is a 
growing appreciation of the political side of life, and 
a realization that society at large exerts a profound 
effect on individual lives. 

As this social dimension of life is rediscovered, 
conflict comes to be seen by an increasing number 
of people as a natural reflection of differences in 
rewards which diverse groups gain for their activities. 

As the post-Berkeley experience indicates, some 
educated young people now recognize this diver- 
gence of interests in the academic world. They real- 
ize that college is not purely a community devoted 
to preparing them for life. Its factions have been 
dramatically revealed; the opposing interests of stu- 
dents, young faculty, older faculty, administrators, 
and trustees are now apparent; some students are 
acutely aware of the cooperation between the col- 
lege and industry, the function that colleges play as 
suppliers of human parts for what has become known 
as the "military-industrial complex." 

Recent research reveals the lack of similar goals 
between academicians and those who help finance 



10 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



colleges. A recent survey of 5000 college and uni- 
versity trustees, by Robert T. Hartnett at the Edu- 
cational Testing Service, is a case in point. Hartnett 
concludes that trustees are strikingly indifferent to 
academic values, uninformed about contemporary 
higher education, and convinced of the inappropri- 
ateness of student and faculty decision-making power 
on crucial academic issues. 

Typically in their fifties, over 98 percent of 
the trustees are white, over half have annual incomes 
exceeding $30,000, and 35 percent are business ex- 
ecutives. In terms of their attitudes, 38 percent 
agreed that it is reasonable to require loyalty oaths 
from faculty, 27 percent believed that faculty mem- 
bers do not have a right to free expression of opin- 
ions, and many agreed that running a university is 
like running a business. 

In light of data like these, anything less than 
profound conflict between many trustees and a grow- 
ing number of both students and faculty is highly 
unlikely unless drastic changes are made. 

Basically, the protest which is occurring in both 
hospitals and colleges reflects a general revolution 
concerning the nature of authority in society. The 
vertical authority of traditional society, in which one 
looked upwards for direction, is giving way to a 
more horizontal, peer-group type of authority. Con- 
trary to some opinion, I do not see in this change a 
desire for no authority at all but, rather, a quest 
for a new, more responsive, more realistic authority. 
Many of the questioners I have met, young profes- 
sionals, college and high school students, are quite 
enamored with the desire to "do their own thing." 
But many of them show a strong need to have some 
help in finding out just what "their own thing" really 
is. 

Generally, in both hospital and the college, it 
has been possible to avoid problems either by diag- 
nosing protesters rather than analyzing protest on its 
own merits, or by viewing protest as a manifesta- 
tion of a conspiracy. In the hospital, those in con- 
trol have long been armed with the doctrine, of 
"mental illness." 

What has been done to mental patients is cur- 
rently being done to students. On campus an effort 
has been made to write off the protests of students 
as manifestations of psychiatric disorders, not as 
responses to profound change in the nature of stu- 
dent life. Psychiatrists and psychologists have leapt 
into the breach, armed with abundance of theory 
and a complete lack of evidence, to diagnose protest- 
ers—regardless of the nature of the protest — as 
"sick." 



What evidence does exist shows a different pic- 
ture than that presented by psychological reduction- 
ists. Writing in The Politics of Protest, Jerome M. 
Skolnick advised the National Commission on the 
Causes of Violence that "the increasing disaffection 
of student activists . . . cannot be explained away 
by referring to personality problems or to youthful 
intransigence or delinquency. On the contrary, re- 
search indicates that activists have usually been 
good students with liberal ideals not unlike those of 
their parents." Skolnick views activism in terms of 
response to social transition and growing class-con- 
sciousness among students. 

It is possible that some activists constitute not 
a "sick" but a prophetic minority, more adept than 
their peers in applying their critical abilities to so- 
cial hypocrisies and immoralities. Yet psychiatric 
theorizing robs protest of this nobility, and even the 
dissenters come to define themselves as "freaks." 
There are undoubtedly personality differences be- 
tween activists and non-activists; however, one can- 
not reduce major social problems to difficulties that 
take place within some people's heads. A student 
who protests against going to Vietnam is not neces- 
sarily paranoid; someone really is trying to kill him. 
The paranoid lives in a benign world and perceives 
it as evilly intentioned. Is it really a sign of "mental 
health" to live in a world that is often malevolent 
and see it as benign? 



Bohr 



PHOTO BY PAUL WILSON 




FALL 1969 



THAT 

PET 

WORD 



"Involvement" is one of the pet words of the day. 

It is as much a part of the "now generation" 
as mini-skirts, long hair, and steel-rimmed eyeglasses. 

It is an oft-used label, a shibboleth invoking 
the kind of unanimous approval that politicians once 
sought with patriotic speeches on the Fourth of July. 

This can be said without depreciating the sin- 
cerity of the idea to which the word is applied. Many 
persons today — young and old — want to contribute 
in some way to the solution of pressing social and 
economic problems. 

Certainly, a good many Susquehanna students, 
faculty members and administrators share this feel- 
ing. A special report presented by the University at 
the annual meeting of the Lutheran Church in 
America's Central Pennsylvania Synod remarks: 

"The student now demands that a greater part 
of his college experience be formulated around pro- 



grams geared toward involvement in the great social 
issues of the day." 

One question is often asked. Does Susquehan- 
na's rural location prevent the University from be- 
coming involved? Must our students be spectators 
rather than participants in the effort to resolve these 
great issues? 

There are no urban ghettos near Susquehanna 
as there are at Columbia, Temple or Wayne State 
University in Detroit. There are no concentrations 
of blacks, Puerto Ricans or other minority groups 
in Snyder County or Sirnbury. Aren't we too remote 
to become involved? 

The special report to the Synod, which met on 
the Susquehanna campus this year, also states: 

"Students attending the small, rural campus 
are stereotyped as living in a microcosm oblivious 
to the problems of the urban crisis. It is the conten- 
tion of the University that location need not be a 
deterrent ... in educating students about the social 
and economic deprivation in the United States." 

Although a great deal has been said and written 
about the ills of urban America, it should be 
pointed out that rural areas also have tremendous 
problems. Twenty-one percent of the residents of 
Snyder County, for example, fall within the federal 
government's definition of poverty — an income of 
less than $3000 for a family of four. The county is 
included in the area referred to as "Appalachia." 

Cloyd Wagner, director of the Snyder County 
Board of Assistance, notes that one of the county's 
biggest problems is the "isolation and loneliness of 
the elderly." According to Wagner, an estimated 
15 percent of the dwelling units in the county are 
occupied by one person. 

This, in turn, creates a host of other problems. 
Lonely, elderly people tend to be undernourished 
because the preparation of food becomes too much 
of a chore for them, even though they may have the 
funds to purchase adequate food. Psychosomatic 
ailments are common. Many become hypochon- 
driacs and a nuisance to doctors. 



12 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




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Susquehanna's graphic display at the 

LCA's Central Pennsylvania Synod convention. 



FALL 1969 



13 



These people also are inclined to let their 
properties deteriorate. This lowers the tax base and 
local governmental units find that they have no funds 
to provide adequate police services, fire protection, 
and support for the schools. 

Some months ago Wagner and some 30 other 
representatives of social welfare agencies in nearby 
counties were invited to the campus and told that 
the students and staff of the University want to 
become involved. 

"We're anxious to take advantage of this de- 
sire on the part of the University." Wagner said. 
"We've been waiting for the day when it would be 
possible." 

Wagner then suggested several projects which 
could utilize student energies: 

• Working with underprivileged children. Stu- 
dents could take the children on picnics, tours of the 
University, etc. In many cases, the parents do not 
have time to do these things. 

• Visiting nursing homes. Fraternities, sorori- 
ties and other campus organizations could "adopt" 
a nursing home and visit the elderly patients on a 
regular basis. 

• "Adopted Grandparents." Individual stu- 
dents also could "adopt" a grandfather and/or 
grandmother, visit them regularly, run errands and 
do chores for them, and listen to their reminiscences. 
"Usually, their own children have moved out and 
many of their friends have died," Wagner adds. 

• Providing transportation for the elderly. 
Often, elderly persons eligible for Medicare or Medi- 
caid receive no medical treatment because they have 
no way of getting to a hospital or physician's office. 

"I'm sure there will be no problem in finding 
useful and relevant things for the students to do," 
Wagner said. 

Although the interest may be particularly keen 
at this time, it should be pointed out that the concept 
of community involvement is by no means new at 
Susquehanna. Students have for years been serving 
as volunteer workers at the Selinsgrove State School 
and Hospital. Fraternities and sororities have spon- 
sored parties for disadvantaged children, contributed 
to blood plasma drives, held fund-raising events for 
community charities, and done volunteer service in 
local convalescent homes. 

Selinsgrove borough authorities know the Uni- 
versity will respond to any plea for help in an 
emergency. Students have helped to search mountain 
ridges for lost hunters, to evacuate residents and 



their belongings from areas threatened by flooding, 
to clear blocked storm drains, etc. 

Many faculty members and administrators have 
served on the Borough Council, school boards and 
church consistories, and held office in a variety of 
community organizations. They have given count- 
less lectures and talks, freely contributed their lead- 
ership abilities, and in numerous ways demonstrated 
that they are concerned citizens. 

A great deal more might have been done, to be 
sure. But any implication that past generations of 
Susquehannans have shown no interest in social 
welfare and community affairs is simply not true. 

However, during the 1968-69 academic year 
a conscious effort was made to increase the Univer- 
sity's involvement. Many possible projects were dis- 
cussed and a modest start was made last spring. 

One project which was begun is the tutoring 
program at Selinsgrove High School. Once a week 
for about two and a half months, 23 Susquehanna 
students tutored high school students who were hav- 
ing difficulties with their studies. Most of the tutor- 
ing was on a one-to-one basis — each tutor working 
with a single student. 

The additional instruction is known to have 
helped a number of the students improve their 
grades. Chester G. Rowe '52, director of guidance at 
the high school, remarked in a letter to University 
officials: 

"We at the high school welcomed the idea from 
the beginning. It was something we felt was missing 
from our overall program. It was greatly needed. 
The enthusiasm displayed by the group of tutors 
was encouraging and our young people were most 
receptive and appreciative. 

"In talking with our people it was difficult to 
find any criticism of the program. Their comments 
were all in praise of it with hopes of participating 
again next year. I hope the reaction of the tutors 
is mutual, and from my observations, it is." 

The tutoring program was continued this year, 
with about 35 students now participating. When and 
if funds can be secured to transport tutors to other 
high schools — some in the area are as much as 30 
miles away — the program can easily be expanded. 

Funding, of course, is a problem which con- 
fronts the University in a number of its attempts to 
provide an education which is increasingly relevant 
to the social issues of the day. For example, it is 
taken for granted that Susquehanna should have a 
student body more nearly reflecting the cultural and 



14 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



racial diversity of American society as a whole. 
Members of the admissions staff have for years ac- 
tively recruited students from minority groups and 
the disadvantaged, but these students and their fami- 
lies usually can contribute very little toward the 
cost of an education. Forty-four percent of the Uni- 
versity's current students receive financial aid of 
some kind and this year both the state and federal 
governments have reduced the funds they had been 
providing for scholarships and loans. 

In one respect, Susquehanna's location does 
complicate the work of the admissions staff. Black 
students from urban areas are generally reluctant to 
come to a predominantly white college in a small 
town where there are few if any residents of their 
own race. 

Tutoring by Susquehanna students has taken 
another form this year also, with volunteers spend- 
ing one night each week with residents of the Odd 
Fellows Orphanage in Sunbury. They help the chil- 
dren with their studies and by their very presence 
provide a witness of love and concern in lives which 
have great need. On a second night of each week 
the children are taken to the Sunbury YMCA for 
swimming and other exercise classes. And during 
the recent November Moratorium, a special activity 
of the Susquehanna students was painting the in- 
terior of the orphanage — with paint donated and a 
local construction firm helping with plastering. In 
these instances members of several Selinsgrove 
churches are providing transportation assistance. 

Other examples of current involvement include: 

• Volunteer work at the day care center for 
children of migrant farm workers. Some 35 students 
and several faculty members have helped to conduct 
this activity during September and October of the 
past two years. 

• Students financed a weekend visit to the 
campus last February by a group of 40 teenagers 
from Harlem. 

• A fast was held last May to raise money for 
the Biafra Relief Fund. About 350 students had 
their meal tickets punched in advance so they 
couldn't eat in the cafeteria on a particular day. 
For each participating student, the University sent 
$1 from the cafeteria budget to the New York head- 
quarters of Church World Service, which collected 
the funds for Biafra. 

• Visits to the inner city areas in Baltimore, 
Washington and New York arranged by student 
groups and academic departments. 



• A Department of Music plan, in conjunction 
with the Philadelphia schools, which will involve 
summer teaching by Susquehanna students. This is 
aimed primarily at inner city and minority groups. 

• Susquehanna students acting as advisers for 
student government and the Key Club at Selinsgrove 
High School, and co-sponsoring big-name entertain- 
ment in the high school. 

• Establishment of a Speakers' Bureau to pro- 
vide students and faculty as speakers for local or- 
ganizations and agencies. 

• A study of water conditions in the Susque- 
hanna Valley to be conducted by the Department of 
Geological Sciences. This should be of inestimable 
value to conservationists. 

• Service projects of fraternities and sororities. 
Phi Mu Delta entertained 20 retarded children at 
the movies and an S.U. football game; sororities help 
with Christmas parties for residents at the Selins- 
grove State School and Hospital; each of the groups 
has at least one service project during the year. 

• Little League baseball. A group from campus 
is planning to help train local youngsters next spring. 

Several members of the Student Senate have 
held meetings with representatives of various com- 
munity organizations to discuss methods of im- 
proving "town and gown" relations. These discus- 
sions were initiated by the students and dealt pri- 
marily with ways of using student volunteers to ful- 
fill community needs. It was suggested that students 
might serve as Boy Scout leaders, Sunday school 
teachers. Little League baseball coaches, and speak- 
ers. The latter two, as indicated earlier, are already 
being given attention. 

Other suggestions were to hold clean-up days 
in the downtown area and for students to present 
one-act plays and other performances at local 
schools. The students pointed out that many cultural 
and educational programs held on the campus are 
open to the public, but seldom well attended. In- 
creased efforts are to be made to encourage 
participation. 

Such meetings with community leaders are con- 
tinuing, and some of those who have been taking 
part feel that the group should be more formally 
organized into a permanent "Community Council." 

In any case, it is expected that Susquehanna's 
"involvement" will extend even further. Geographi- 
cal location is not seen as a deterrent. Indeed, in an 
increasingly urbanized world, it may afford oppor- 
tunity for a unique contribution of service. 



FALL 1969 



15 





Alumni Association President Ed Rogers 
presents winners' trophies to Nancy Porch 
and Jane Malanch.uk of Alpha Delta Pi 
and Boh Dachik of Phi Mu Delta. The 
winning float, above, features Crusader 
Rabbit and Rags. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



HOMECOMING: 

A Near-Perfect Day 

Traditional Homecoming festivities were held at Susque- 
hanna University on Saturday, October 11. Beginning 
with the Coronation Pageant on Friday evening, the entire 
weekend was generously scheduled with a variety of 
activities to please young and old alike. The crowd was 
large, the weather was fine, the floats were great, the bands 
were marvelous. If it just hadn't been for Ithaca . . . 



Frustration is written on the faces of these students during 
Susquehanna's Homecoming football game with Ithaca College. 
The Orange and Maroon lost, 27-14, and are still looking 
for their first Homecoming win since 1964. 



FALL 1969 





The Queen's Court, all aboard their 

convertibles for the parade through 

Selinsgrove, consisted of Kathy 

Van Order '70, Berkeley Heights. N.J.; 

Catherine Rogers '71, Downingtown, 

Pa.; and, below, Sandra McDermott '72, 

Northport, N.Y.; and Jane Herrold '73, 

Mt. Wolf, Pa. 




Homecoming Queen Eileen Moninghof} '70, 
an English major from Milford, 
N.J., is escorted b\ Eric Horn '68. 



18 






Quarterback Ernie Tyler throws one of 15 
completions in the Ithaca game. One of 
the Crusader scores came on a 66-yard pass 
play to Cal McCants, the other on a 1-yard 
rush by Bill Guth. Steve Freeh added 
both extra points. Above, left, an interested 
spectator was Dick Derrick '61, now a New 
Jersey dentist, who was quite a passer 
himself and co-captain of the '60 team. 
Dick was accompanied by his wife Carol. 
Below, Dick Scharfe '31 reminisces with 
friends at registration on the 
Campus Center terrace. 




Sports Hall of Famers are 
entertained at lunch. From 
left: Ed '42 and Blanche 
Forney Rogers '42, Evan 
Zlock '49 and Mrs. Zlock, 
President and Mrs. Weber, 
John Meyers '33. Zlock and 
Meyers were inducted into 
the prestigious Hall of 
Fame at game's half time. 



FALL 1969 



19 




20 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Susquehannans On Parade 



'16 

The Rev. David A. Kammerer of 
Littlestown. Pa. was honored on the 
50th anniversary of his ordination 
this year. He was presented with a 
commemorative certificate during the 
convention of the Central Pennsyl- 
vania Synod, Lutheran Church in 
America, at Susquehanna University 
in June. 

'17 

The Rev. Dr. Park W. Huntington 
was reappointed national chaplain of 
the American Legion Press Associa- 
tion at the organization's 51st na- 
tional convention. He is also grand 
chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Ma- 
sons of Delaware. 

The Rev. Albert F. Klepfer has re- 
tired and is living at 2055 Alsace 
Rd., Reading, Pa. 19604. 

'22 

Merle A. Beam of Windher, Pa. 
was elected president of the Pennsyl- 
vania State Showman's Association 
at the state convention in Williams- 
port. 

'24 

Emily Van Dyke retired last spring 
as junior high librarian in the Shikel- 
lamy Schools, Sunbury. She has since 
devoted a great deal of her time to 
traveling. 

'25 

The Rev. Marlin M. Enders has re- 
tired as pastor of St. James Lutheran 
Church, Pittsburgh. He and his wife, 
the former Elsie Nace '27, are living 
at 840 California Ave., Avalon, Pitts- 
burgh. Pa. 15202. 

'26 

Dr. Lee C. Boxer recently pub- 
lished a booklet on the mathematical 
applications of the Gateway Arch at 
St. Louis. Since retiring, he has been 
teaching two days a week at Harris- 
burg Area Community College. 

Gere Sharretts retired last spring 
as a science teacher in the Shikellamy 
Schools. Sunbury. 




Huntington 



Margaret Keiser was honored in 
the spring with a surprise anniver- 
sary party celebrating completion of 
35 years of teaching. 

The Rev. Lester B. Lutz. pastor of 
St. Luke's Lutheran Church, Fern- 
dale, Pa., was feted on June 8 at a 
Service of Thanksgiving marking the 
40th anniversary of his ordination. 
Also a graduate of the former S.U. 
Seminary, Pastor Lutz served in 
Mahanoy City, Pa. for 27 years be- 
fore assuming the pastorate at St. 
Luke's in 1956. Preacher of the an- 
niversary sermon was the Rev. Dr. 
William A. Janson '44, president of 
the LCA's Southeastern Pennsylvania 
Synod. Mrs. Lutz is the former 
Hilda Bohner '24. 

The Rev. Donald L. Rhoads ob- 
served the 40th anniversary of his 
ordination at St. John's Lutheran 
Church, Essington, Pa., where he is 
now pastor. His brother, the Rev. 
Dr. Luke H. Rhoads '30 was the 
guest speaker. Pastor Rhoads is mar- 
ried to the former Ann Kleim '21. 

x'26 

Thurston K. Decker has been ap- 
pointed manager of purchasing for 
the Electronics Group of TRW Inc. 
In his new assignment he will co- 
ordinate purchasing activities for di- 
visions comprising the Group, which 
manufactures a broad line of elec- 
tronic components for the govern- 
ment, commercial and industrial 
markets. 



'27 

The Rev. Russell Knoebel of Na- 
vato, Calif., a retired U.S. Air Force 
chaplain, paid a visit to the S.U. 
campus during the summer. 

Dr. G. Franklin Stover, for 14 
years professor of education in the 
Graduate School of Education at 
Rutgers University, is now profes- 
sor of human development at Penn 
State University. 

'28 

Mary Dreese Strieker has retired 
from teaching and is living at her 
home in McClure, Pa. 

x'31 

Gerhard F. Kern is field auditor 
for the Bureau of Sales and Use Tax, 
Pennsylvania Department of Rev- 
enue. He lives in Harrisburg. 

'33 

Col. William R. Swarm was 
saluted in a "This is Your Life" is- 
sue of The Millheim (Pa.) Journal 
on July 3. with half of the weekly 
newspaper devoted to his distinguish- 
ed career. A former track star at Sus- 
quehanna. Bill has been on active 
duty in the U.S. Army since 1940 and 
is currently a member of the Offi- 
cers Special Review Board — the "Su- 
preme Court" of the Army. A civil 
affairs specialist, he has written 
widely on the subject and been deco- 
rated by numerous governments. At 
one time during World War II he 
had over half the world's people 
under his area of command — the en- 
tire Asiatic Theatre of Military Gov- 
ernment and Civil Affairs. 

'34 

The Rev. Dr. Harold L. Rowe has 
been called by the Board of Ameri- 
can Missions, Lutheran Church in 
America, as mission developer for 
the Pike Creek Valley Area in Dela- 
ware. He formerly served St. Mark's 
Lutheran Church. Harrisburg. 

John W. Oberdorf is field repre- 
sentative for the State of Oregon for 
Senator Mark Hatfield. He, with wife 
and family, lives in Salem, Ore. 



FALL 1969 



21 



'35 

The Rev. Robert R. dark, who 
served the Board of Publication, Lu- 
theran Church in America, for 12 
years as editor of the Weekly Church 
Bulletin Service, Light for Today, and 
The Ministers Information Service, 
is now pastor of Christ, Casebeer, 
Lutheran Church near Sipesville, 
Somerset County, Pa. 

'38 

Dr. Chester C. Hess was appointed 
to the Board of Trustees of Wood- 
ville State Hospital in Allegheny 
County by Pennsylvania Governor 
Raymond P. Shafer hc'67. A resident 
of Bridgeville, Dr. Hess has practiced 
medicine in the South Hills section of 
Pittsburgh for the past 28 years. 

'44 

The Rev. Roy A. Gutshall is now 
pastor of St. John's Lutheran Church 
at Delaware Run. Pa. He was in- 
stalled by the Rev. Walter L. Bran- 
dan '51, pastor of Trinity Church, 
Milton and dean of the Milton 
District. 

The Rev. Henry F. Hopkins, pas- 
tor of the Wesley United Methodist 
Church. Williamsport, for the past 
seven years, has been transferred to 
the Huntingdon (Pa.) United Meth- 
odist Church. 

'46 

Dr. Roswell J. Johns has returned 
from Europe where he attended med- 
ical seminars at the University of 
Vienna Medical School and Hospital, 
the Cardio-Vascular Hospital in 
Istanbul, Turkey, and the Evangel- 
ismos Medical Center, Athens, 
Greece. While in Austria, he was 
installed in the American Medical 
Society of Vienna. He and his wife, 
the former Gayle Clark, '47, reside in 
Millerstown, Pa. 

x'46 

William F. Hoke is president of 
The Fulton National Bank, Lancas- 
ter, Pa. 

'48 

Kenneth D. Loss had his verse, 
"Autumn Chill," published in a re- 
cent issue of Instructor. 

'50 

Donald F. Wohlsen has been 
named divisional vice president by 



the Industrial Valley Bank and Trust 
Co., Philadelphia. He is in charge 
of 19 offices of the bank in Lehigh, 
Montgomery, and Chester Counties. 
He and his wife, the former Betty 
Beam '51, and family live in Ambler, 
Pa. 

'55 

Ivors Avots has moved with his 
family to Manila, Philippines, where 
they will stay for two years. With 
the consulting firm of Arthur D. 
Little, Inc., Ivars is project manager 
on a major transportation survey in- 
volving the countries of Vietnam, 
Laos, Thailand, Malaya, Singapore, 
Brunei, Indonesia, and the Philip- 
pines. He specializes in the applica- 
tion of management planning and con- 
trol techniques to a wide variety of 
industries and recently had an article, 
"Why Does Project Management 
Fail?", published in California Man- 
agement Review. 

Russell J. Crouse Jr. is assistant 
professor of education at Davis and 
Elkins College, Elkins, W. Va. 

'56 

Anna Jane Moyer, assistant read- 
ers' services librarian at Gettysburg 
College, was presented with an award 
for Outstanding Service to the 
Campus by the Gettysburg College 
chapter of Alpha Phi Omega, na- 
tional service fraternity, in recog- 
nition of her help to students and 
faculty. 

'57 

Chester A. Hall is now with Cer- 
tain-Teed Products Corp., Philadel- 
phia. 

John S. Hendricks has begun his 
new duties as vice president and gen- 
eral manager of Phillips Fuel Co., 
Hackensack. N.J. New address for 
the Hendricks family is 37 Feather 
Lane, Old Tappan, N.J. 07675. 

The Rev. John A. Roshon, Jr. has 
accepted a call to serve the Lundar 
Lutheran Church, Lundar, Manitoba. 
Canada. He was formerly pastor of 
Grace Church, Sunbury. Mrs. Ro- 
shon is the former Nancy Zimmer- 
man '59. 

x'58 

Terry Abrams has become deputy 
Republican State Chairman of Penn- 
sylvania. In addition to his job as 
backup man for the chairman, he 
will assume public relations duties. 



Charles W. Gruver has been elect- 
ed business manager of Selinsgrove 
Area Schools. He was recently as- 
sociated with Weis Products in Har- 
risburg. 

'59 

Peter P. Pace has left the Harris- 
burg Branch of Burroughs and is 
located at the firm's home office in 
Detroit as an educational specialist. 
He and his wife, the former Betsy 
Walker '59, and two children live 
at 6236 Worlington Rd., Berming- 
ham, Mich. 48010. 

The Rev. Glace A. Riegel is at- 
tending post graduate school in Phil- 
adelphia, preparing to become a 
chaplain. The Riegel family is liv- 
ing in Folcroft, Pa. 

'60 

Dr. William A. Elmer, a specialist 
in developmental biology, has been 
appointed assistant professor of biol- 
ogy at Emory University, Atlanta, 
Ga. He received his Ph.D. at the 
University of Connecticut. 

The Rev. Gary A. Hackenberg was 
installed as pastor of Christ Church, 
Annville, Pa., in September. He form- 
erly served the Salem UCC in Col- 
umbia, Pa. 

Allen I. Rowe has been promoted 
from assistant controller of Prince- 
ton University to business manager 
of Princeton's Plasma Physics Lab- 
oratory, located at the James For- 
restal Research Center. It is one of 
the four major controlled thermonu- 
clear research facilities supported by 
the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. 

x'60 

John R. Khts is now surveyor for 
the English Engineering Corp., Wil- 
liamsport, Pa. He is married to the 
former Gwenllian Park '60. The 
couple and their three sons live in 
Montgomery. 

'61 

Dana Wilson Mosteller and her 
two children accompanied her hus- 
band to Japan for a tour of duty 
with the U.S. Navy. They are sta- 
tioned at Sasebo, a large naval base 
on Kyushu, the southernmost of the 
Japanese Islands. 

A. G. Terry Shaffer has been 
named director of club service by 
Kiwanis International. He has moved 
to Chicago where he works out of 
the national office. 



22 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Rowe and Snxder 



'62 

William Kahl is division chief of 
claims. Division for Vietnam Con- 
flict Bonus Bureau, Department of 
Military Affairs, Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. He lives in Selinsgrove. 

Capt. Lynn E. Snyder is attending 
the Air University's Squadron Officer 
School at Maxwell AFB, Ala. In- 
struction includes communicative 
skills, leadership, international rela- 
tions, and responsibilities in prepar- 
ing junior officers for command-staff 
duties. 

x'62 

Dr. John Albright of Lewisburg. 
Pa. was elected president of the 
North Central Podiatry Association 
at a recent meeting. 

'63 

James J. Campbell is enrolled as 
a first-year student at the Law 
School of Duquesne University. His 
wife, the former Philippa Hughes 
'65, is working as a registered occu- 
pational therapist at the Crippled 
Children's Hospital. Pittsburgh. Pa. 

The Rev. Donald S. Cornelius has 
entered the Yale University Divinity 
School as a graduate student. 

Robert W. Curtis has accepted a 
post as operations analyst with 
Honeywell, Inc. and is now living 
at 410 Graveland Ave., Apt. 106, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 55403. 

Joe W. Kleinbauer, operating as 
"J. Kleinbauer, Gentlemen's Furn- 
ishings," has opened a brand new 
store at the corner of Market and 
Chestnut Sts., Selinsgrove, the form- 
er home and offices of the late Joseph 
Ingham. Esq. The building is reno- 
vated inside and out in unique peri- 
od style. 

Capt. John H. E. Krohn graduated 
from the Adjutant Officers Advanced 
Course at Fort Harrison, Ind. and 



was assigned to duty in Oakland, 
Calif. 

Madelyn Valunas, formerly a li- 
brarian at East Stroudsburg State 
College, is touring England, Den- 
mark, Scotland, and Sweden prior to 
locating in Munich. Germany. She 
is the daughter of Thomas x'37 and 
Katharine Stetler Valunas '35. 

x'63 

Eleanor M. Smith received her 
B.S. degree in biology from Lebanon 
Valley College last spring. She is a 
medical technologist at the Veterans 
Administration Hospital in Lebanon, 
Pa. 

'64 

Linda Romig Batlaglia is head of 
the Music Department at The Shipley 
School, Bryn Mawr. Pa. She lives in 
Princeton, N.J.. where her husband 
is assistant headmaster of the Colum- 
bus Boychoir School. 

Peter Beiger was a member of the 
summer faculty of project SESAME. 
a program of advanced study for sec- 
ondary students, where he assisted in 
the combined music and drama pro- 
gram. He is now a candidate for the 
M.A. at Penn State. Other S.U. alum- 
ni in the SESAME program were 
Allen Flock '47, professor of music 
at Bucknell, and Jack Fries '61, in- 
structor in music at Susquehanna. 

John Eggert has accepted the posi- 
tion of dean of students at the Ameri- 
can College of Switzerland in Leysin. 
He received his master's degree from 
Temple in 1965 and has comDleted 
some work towards the Ph.D. at 
N.Y.U. He has been at Long Island 
University for the past three years 
as assistant dean of students. 

Lt. Kenneth E. Gordon is current- 
ly stationed at the Naval Air Sta- 
tion. Lemoore, Calif., flying the A7 
Corsair Jet attack aircraft. Address 
for Ken and his wife, the former 
Pamela Terry x'63, is 10877 Spring 
Lane. Lemoore, Calif. 93245. 

Capt. Joseph O'Hara, a veteran of 
174 missions, has received his sixth 
and seventh awards of the Air Medal 
for air action over Southeast Asia. 
He was cited for his outstanding air- 
manship and courage on successful 
and important missions under hazard- 
ous conditions. He is married to the 
former D. Arlene Roberts '64 and 
they are at Westover AFB, Mass., 
where he is now serving in a unit of 
the Strategic Air Command. Skip 



and Arlene are the parents of Ken- 
neth Scott, born January 28, 1969. 

x'64 

Michael L. Johnston graduated 
from Hiram Scott College, Scotts- 
bluff, Neb., as a psychology major 
and is now doing graduate work at 
the University of Nebraska. 

'65 

Richard S. Karschner is doing full- 
time graduate work at Temple Uni- 
versity in music education. He and 
his wife, the former Grace Seming- 
ton '64, and two daughters live in 
Hillcrest. Philadelphia. 

June Lawrence Alter and her hus- 
band Joseph are directors of Fashion 
Two Twenty Cosmetics. Their studio, 
located at Upper Darby, Pa., is a 
training and distributing center for 
Fashion Two Twenty in the Dela- 
ware Valley. 

Carl L. Campbell has been named 
assistant vice president for opera- 
tions of the Tri-County National 
Bank, with responsibility for co- 
ordinating and controlling the bank's 
new data processing system. He lives 
in Selinsgrove. 

Linda Cole Corine is teaching sec- 
ond grade at the Alpha (N.J.) Pub- 
lic Schools and lives at 546 Moravian 
Ave., Easton, Pa. 18042. 

John H. Frederick has completed 
his tour of duty with the U.S. Army 
and is now on the faculty at Gate- 
way Regional High School, Wood- 
bury Heights, N.J. 

Cathy Macky lives at 1739A De- 
Ianey Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 19103. 

Daniel C. Render has been pro- 
moted to assistant to the vice presi- 
dent of finance with the Venus Ester- 
brook Corp. in New York City. He 
lives with wife and family at 162 
Hunter Ave., Fanwood, N.J. 07023. 

Robert Winegardner is an assistant 
manager with the W. T. Grant Co. 
He and his wife live at 119 North 
Brown St., Lewistown, Pa. 

x'65 

Richard C. Nafash is a senior 
chemical engineering consultant rep- 
resentative and analyst for Seafark 
Chemtronics, Inc.. East Rutherford, 
N.J. He plans to finish his bachelor's 
degree in the near future. 

'66 

Timothy R. Barnes is a part-time 
instructor at Elizabethtown College 



FALL 1969 



23 




The offspring of Susquehanna alumni — and other relatives as well — continue 
to look to Susquehanna as a school where they, too, want to study for that 
degree. Among this year's nearly 400 freshmen are these sons and daughters, top 
photo, first row: Kathleen F. Gloster (Francis '52 and Mary McNiven Gloster 
x'52), Joyce A. Brown (Hazel Brobst Brown '51), Jane E. Herrold (Warren 
Herrold '41), Allison D. Butts (Harry '48 and Virginia Doss Butts '48), Carol A. 
Bringman (Dale '48 and Mary Mover Bringman '45), Anne L. Lucas (Janet 
Sharrow Lucas x'49), Linda D. Walton (Lucius L. Walton '51), Deborah 
G. Reifsnyder (Nancy Griesemer Reifsnyder '42) Lynda L. Beadle (Mary Stirewall 
Beadle '36). Second row: J. Donald Steele Jr. (J. Donald Steele '33), Joseph 
D. Long (J. Chester Long '37), James L. Bergen (James W. Bergen '58), Steven 
L. Brinser (Jean Kinzer Brinser '45), Dennis G. Moseby (Helen Wright Moseby 
'40), David A. Coryell (Patricia Snyder Coryell '45), M. Jeffrey Greco (Joseph 
Greco '41), Ray W. King (Nelson J. King '34). Two — Susan L. Phillips 
(Clarence E. Phillips '25) and S. John Price Jr. (John Price '42) — were missing 
from the picture session and one appears below with other relatives, first row: 
Maren L. Alekel, Elizabeth A. James, Debra A. Snyder, Susan J. Lentzner, 
Kathleen B. Murphy, Ruth Zierdt, Betsy J. Haas, Kathleen L. Hummel. Second 
row: Renee H. Moore, Rebecca Young, Linda Herrold, Joyce Warrender, 
Phyllis Gillette, Leann R. Diehl, Elaine Cooper. Third row: Gale 1. Moore 
(William T. Moore '63), Judith A. Holmes, Mary Beth Kibbe. 



in tliypsf 




and is studying for the master's de- 
gree in divinity at the Lancaster 
Theological Seminary. 

Susan Bannister Boone is a refer- 
ence assistant in the library at Smith 
College. She and her husband live 
at 8 King St., Hatfield, Mass. 10138. 

1/Lt. Wayne H. Fisher, a com- 
munications officer with the U.S. 
Air Force Logistics Command, has 
reported for duty at Griffin AFB, 
N.Y., after previously serving at Phu 
Cat AB, Vietnam. 

Thomas Gresh has completed his 
military service and is now employed 
by Butter Krust in Sunbury. 

Elaine Semington Strehle is a nurse 
at Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia, 
working in the cardiac care unit. Her 
husband is a medical student at Jef- 
ferson. 

'67 

l/Lt. Ted Kubacki, recently pro- 
moted, is with the U.S. Army in 
Vietnam. After some time in the 
battle zone, he is now training South 
Vietnamese Army Regulars. He has 
received the Bronze Star and the 
Purple Heart. Address: 0-154-34- 
9926. HHC 199 LIB (ARVN-MTT), 
APO San Francisco, Calif. 96279. 

Craig L. Lawson, a second-year 
student at Drew University Theo- 
logical Seminary, plans to spend the 
academic year 1970-71 in Switzer- 
land with L'Abri Fellowship. He will 
then return for his final year at 
Drew. 

x'67 

Reynold L. Badman is attending 
the University of Southern Califor- 
nia working part-time toward a mas- 
ter's degree in library science. He is 
currently a librarian with the Los 
Angeles Public Library System. 

'68 

Willard M. Grimes III has grad- 
uated second in his class from the 
Army's 9th Chemical Operations Ap- 
prentice Course at the U.S. Army 
Chemical School, Fort McClellan, 
Ala. He and his wife, the former 
Carolyn Ruocco '67, live at 1203'/2 
Leighton Ave., Apt. C, Anniston, 
Ala. 36201. 

Andrew G rover is a full-time grad- 
uate student at Columbia University 
where he holds a grant of $3000 
from the State of Illinois. He was 
cited by the East Longmeadow 
(N.J.) YMCA for his work as sum- 



24 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




Becky Jo Fritz '72, a psychology 
major from Benton, Pa., travels 
about the Commonwealth this 
year as the reigning Pennsylvania 
Poultry Queen. She was crowned 
at the annual Pennsylvania 
Dutch Days in Hershey. 



mer director of program activities. 

Jeffrey T. Ketaner graduated from 
the VISTA Training Center in Chi- 
cago and will spend the year working 
in Vincennes. Indiana, with the Eco- 
nomic Opportunity Commission of 
Knox and Sullivan Counties. Inc. 

Fred Lehr, a student at Gettys- 
burg Seminary, is the freshman soc- 
cer coach for Gettysburg College. 
He also serves as assistant varsity 
track coach in the spring. 

Sp/4 David G. Lomison is a radio 
operator with the 17th Cavalry 101st 
Airborne Division. His address: 
51918-837, B. Troop 2/17 Cav., 101 
Airborne Division. APO San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 96383. 

Sgt. Leonard J. Marzano is cur- 
rently stationed at the Fifth Army 
Data Processing Center, Fort Sheri- 
dan, 111. He is the non-commissioned 
officer in charge of the military per- 
sonnel in the Data Conversion Sec- 
tion. 

Walter L. Startzel Jr. is now en- 
rolled in a program of graduate 
studies at the Lutheran Theological 
Seminary at Gettysburg. 



David Sandham and his wife, the 
former Janet Brian '67, are serving 
in the Peace Corps in Brazil. They 
are teaching in the elementary schools 
and organizing clubs for students. 
Their address: Voluntaries da paz, 
Caixa Postal Fo, Morrinhos, Goias, 
Brasil, South America. 

Nancy Corson Carter and her hus- 
band gave gone to Italy for a year to 
do research on their Ph.D. degrees. 

Catherine L. Strese is teaching 
primary vocal music in the Rosetree- 
Media School District. Media, Pa. 

Robert C. Vogel is with the Fidel- 
ity Bank of Philadelphia as a man- 
agement trainee in the Real Estate 
Division, Trust and Investment De- 
partment. His wife is the former 
Barbara Hogg x'69 and they have a 
son. They live at 500 Wayne Dr., 
Apt. 101. King of Prussia, Pa. 19406. 



Steve Vak is now teaching and is 
assistant wrestling coach at North 
Schuylkill High School, Ashland, Pa. 
He is married to the former Sharon 
Fetterolf '68. 

Ralph G. Zeigler was promoted to 
airman first class in the U.S. Air 
Force. He is a finance specialist at 
Lowry AFB, Colo., and was recently 
named Outstanding Airman of the 
Month in his unit of the Air Train- 
ing Command. 

x'68 

Sp/4 William H. Rakila Jr., re- 
turned from U.S. Army service in 
Vietnam, was featured in a cover 
story in The Lutheran (Nov. 5, 1969) 
dealing with the feelings of veterans 
and the responsibilities of the church 
toward those who come home. Bill 
plans to enroll at the University of 
Massachusetts next spring. 




As Susquehanna completed the '69 football season and celebrated 
the 100th anniversary of college football with use of the NCAA 
centennial symbol on each player's helmet, it is interesting to re- 
view the Crusaders' own all-time record in playing The College 
Game. 

Beginning in 1892, the Suskies have played 71 seasons of foot- 
ball over the past 78 years — 521 games in all, winning 209, losing 
277, and tieing 35. The '69 squad, in winning 6 and losing 3, pro- 
duced the 23rd winning season. There were 6 undefeated seasons, 
including that of 1894 in which only one game was played — with 
the Bucknell Academy; 7 seasons were all tied up and 7 others pro- 
duced no wins. 

Susquehanna has had 27 head coaches, 12 of whom coached 
one season apiece. One, President Gustave Weber, coached only two 
games at the close of the '65 season. The longest coaching tenure 
was that of Amos Alonzo Stagg Ir., who mentored the Crusaders 
for 17 years. During 6 of those seasons he shared the head coaching 
job with his father, the Grand Old Man of Football, Amos Alonzo 
Stagg Sr. The best coaching record in terms of wins and losses was 
compiled by Jim Garrett during his 5-7/9 seasons beginning in 1960. 
He won 39, lost 11, and tied 1; he had 2 undefeated years; his '62 
team had a perfect 9-0-0, posting more wins in one season than any 
other Crusader football squad. 

Current Head Coach Jim Hazlett now has a record of 12 wins, 
23 losses and 1 tie over the past 4 years. 



FALL 1969 



25 



SU Sports 



by Ron Berkheimer 



If the winter and spring teams can maintain the momen- 
tum established in the fall. Susquehanna could have its best 
year in athletics since 1962-63 when the University's various 
teams won 80, lost 58 and tied 1. 

Both the football (9-0) and women's field hockey 
(5-0) teams were undefeated in the fall of 1962. The bas- 
ketball team followed with a 20-4 record and the tennis 
team was 10-2 the next spring. 

Susquehanna's 1969 fall teams won 26, lost 18 and tied 
3. The football team (6-3) had its first winning season in 
five years and both the cross country (11-1) and soccer 
(7-4-1) teams posted the best records the University has 
had in those sports. 

* * * 

Two backs who toiled on the defensive unit during the 
1968 season switched to offense and led S.U.'s football 
comeback this year. 

Sophomore quarterback Ernie Tyler, "the Shikellamy 
splinter." set new Susquehanna records for passes com- 
pleted (87) and passing yardage (1239) in a single season. 
The old records — 67 completions and 922 yards — were set 
by Bob O'Gara in 1948 and Rich Young in 1951. 

In addition, Tyler ran for 219 yards and was only 23 
short of the University's total offense record of 1481. also 
set by Young in 1951. 

Jeff Goria. a junior halfback from Woodcliff Lake. 
N.J., led the Crusaders in rushing with 294 yards. He was 
second in receiving with 19 catches for 285 yards and third 
in scoring with 32 points. Susquehanna used a formation 
with two split ends and a slotback. Goria blocked well in 
the slot and also saw considerable action on defense as a 
"roving back" or "monster." He did everything well. 

Tyler and Goria got their chance to play offense when 
two of the team's 1968 regulars — senior quarterback Ed 
Danner of Wellsboro, Pa., and junior halfback Dennis 
Simmons of Harrisburg — were sidelined with pre-season 
injuries. When Danner and Simmons returned to action 
later, they had to find new positions. Danner moved to 
defense and Simmons became a fullback. 

Susquehanna's 5-1 record in Middle Atlantic Confer- 
ence games gave the Crusaders a second-place finish in the 
MAC's Northern College Division. Wilkes was undefeated 
in conference play and took first place. Tyler led the divi- 
sion in total offense, passing yardage, and touchdown passes. 

Perhaps the most remarkable thing about Tyler's pass- 
ing exploits is that he comes from a high school (Shikellamy 
High in Sunbury) which wins consistently but seldom 
throws the ball. Although Shikellamy is coached by another 
former S.U. quarterback, Dick Purnell '58, the Braves pre- 
fer to grind it out on the ground. 

Tyler threw 13 touchdown passes during the season, 
with six going to junior split end Cal McCants of White 
Plains, N.Y., a 10-flat sprinter who helped the University's 




These seniors completed their collegiate football careers 
this season, left to right and top to bottom: Danner, 
DePerro, Drabina, Freeh, Guth, Malasheskie, Merz- 



track team compile a 13-1 record last spring. The Tyler- 
to-McCants combination accounted for three long touch- 
down plays in a highly satisfying 31-14 victory over 
Juniata, which had beaten Susquehanna by one-sided scores 
for four years in a row. 

Other big wins were a 3-0 thriller with Westminster 
and a 25-6 upset over Wagner. Senior placekicking special- 
ist Steve Freeh of Binghamton, N.Y., kicked a 40-yard 
field goal with 25 seconds to play in the Westminster game. 
The game-winning kick by a one-armed player attracted 
the attention of the prestigious Maxwell Club of Phila- 
delphia, which presented a special award to Freeh. In ad- 
dition, Freeh had field goals of 42 yards against Upsala 
and 24 yards against Juniata and made 22 of his 23 extra 
point attempts. 

Wagner, a much bigger team physically, was picked by 
all the football forecasters, but S.U. took the kickoff and 
drove 89 yards to score. Tyler ran for the final 49 on a 
neatly executed bootleg and the Crusaders remained in 
command throughout the game. Susquehanna also scored 
two other touchdowns and picked up four points on a pair 
of safeties. 

Despite the surprising performances of Tyler and 
Goria, the coaching staff picked senior halfback Bill Guth 



26 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



of Erie, Pa., as the team's most valuable player for the 
second straight year. Guth tied McCants for the lead in 
scoring with 36 points and was second in rushing with 254 
yards. He began the season as an offensive halfback, but 
when the linebackers did not play well in the first three 
games, head coach Jim Hazlett asked Guth to go both 
ways. Strong, aggressive and mobile, Guth was the best 
linebacker the Crusaders have had since the halcyon days 
of the early '60s. 

Other players who had excellent seasons were tackles 
Tom Lyons, a junior from Irwin, Pa., and Pat Gallagher, 
a freshman from Erie; senior middle guard Gerry Drabina, 
also from Erie; offensive tackle Irv Miller, a junior from 
Newtown Square, Pa.; and sophomore split end and scat- 
back Mike Huth of Freeport, Pa., who scored two touch- 
downs on punt returns. 

Drabina led the Crusaders in tackling (58 tackles and 
37 assists) and was named four times to the Eastern Col- 
lege Athletic Conference Division III (small-college) team 
of the week. Miller was named lineman of the week three 
times by the S.U. coaches for his excellent blocking. 
* * * 

Susquehanna added soccer to its athletic program in 
1959 and the Crusaders had never managed a winning sea- 
son until this year. The best previous record was 5-5-1 in 
1964. 

Outstanding performers on the 1969 squad included 
scoring leaders Deshler Schenck (6 goals, 2 assists) and 
Jeff Breed (5 goals, 3 assists); halfbacks Larry Colling- 
wood, a junior from Roanoke. Va., and Bob Reilly, a 
senior from Holmes, Pa.; and fullback Dwight Blake, a 
sophomore from Worcester, Mass. Schenck, senior inside 
from Highland Park, N.J., and Breed, junior wingman from 
Hudson Falls, N.Y., both played on the right side of the 
line. 

Bucknell. Philadelphia Textile and Elizabethtown — 
three of the teams which defeated the Crusaders — received 
berths in post-season tournaments. The other S.U. loss was 
to Drew, which tied Elizabethtown for the MAC's Northern 
College Division title. Bucknell won the University Division 
crown. 

"The strength of the team was at halfback and in the 
fact that we had better depth this year. We had to play 
without one or more of our starters every game," said head 
coach Dr. Neil Potter. 

An outstanding group of freshmen led the cross coun- 
try team to another good season. Frosh Bob Hough of 
Morristown, N.J.; Bill Hamilton, Oradell, N.J.; and Carl 
Dillich. Gibbsboro, N.J., usually led the way for the Cru- 
saders, followed closely by sophomore Jeff Karver of Boy- 
ertown, Pa. 

Ten of the 14 runners on the cross country team were 
freshmen. Upperclassmen. in addition to Karver, were team 
captain Dave Rosborough, a junior from Saxonburg, Pa.; 
Mike Gerardi, junior from Williamsport. Pa.; and Doug 
Neiner, sophomore from Belleville, Pa. 

Other freshmen were Steve DiCicco, Waterloo, N.Y.; 
Jeff Claycomb, Johnstown, Pa.; Doug Hauser, Mt. Pleasant, 




Frosh cross country runners 
Hamilton, Hough and Dillich. 



FALL 1969 



27 



Pa.; Steve Marcinek, Shamokin, Pa.; George McKinnell, 
Brookside, N.J.; Philip Ousley, Levittown, Pa.; and Nevin 
Weaver, Mill Creek, Pa. 

Steady performances by DiCicco, Marcinek and Mc- 
Kinnel gave the Crusaders excellent depth, allowing them 
to win easily in several meets when an individual standout 
from another team took first place. 

Dr. Tarn Poison, dean of students and cross country 
coach, has an eight-year coaching record of 54-28. His 
teams posted records of 7-3 in 1964, 11-2 in 1965, 9-3 in 
1967 and 6-5 in 1968. 

* * * 

A lack of experience and depth up front were ex- 
pected to be problems for Susquehanna's basketball team 
and new coach Don Harnum. 

Team captain Ed Scherer, a senior from Syosset, N.Y., 
is the only experienced player in the forecourt where other 
probable starters were 6-5 freshman Gordon Sullivan of 
Concord, Mass., and 6-4 sophomore Jan Mroz of Scranton. 

Scherer (6-3) averaged 15.8 points and 12.4 rebounds 
per game last season. Agile and a good ball handler, he 
could play for most major-college teams. 

Other returning Iettermen are guards Barry Boblick, 
a junior from Shamokin, Pa., and Ken Freeland, a sopho- 
more from Harrisburg. Boblick, who averaged 17 points 



a game in 1968-69, is quick and has good hands. Harnum 
hopes that Boblick will become a defensive standout this 
season and continue to score well. 

The Crusaders will play a deliberate offense, wait for 
good shots, and try to eliminate mistakes, Harnum said. 
* * * 

Wrestling coach Charlie Kunes can't wait until the 
spring semester when he'll have two Bechtels on his team. 

Bill Bechtel, junior 126-pounder from Selinsgrove, has 
a two-year record of 20-0-2 in dual meet competition. His 
younger brother, Rick, is thought to be just as good. After 
attending Clarion State for one semester, Rick transferred 
to Susquehanna last January. He wrestles in the 118-pound 
class. Rick becomes eligible in the second semester and 
will be able to wrestle in six of Susquehanna's 10 meets. 

Kunes has five other Iettermen from a team which 
won 6 and lost 4 last winter, so the prospects for another 
winning season are good. In fact, the Crusaders have never 
had a losing season in wrestling, which was added to the 
athletic program three years ago. 

Susquehanna's meets will last longer this season. An 
additional weight class (190 pounds) has been made man- 
datory by the NCAA. Most smaller colleges in the East 
did not have 190-pound bouts previously, but jumped from 
177 to "unlimited." 



























CRUXRDER MOmORRD 
















FALL 1969-70 










su 


Opp. 


su 




Opp. 


SU 




Opp. 




FOOTBALL 






CROSS COUNTRY 






SOCCER 




27 


Otterbein 


28 


15 


Kings 


50 


1 


Elizabethtown 


6 


3 


Westminster 





23 


Juniata 


38 


4 


Drew 


7 


31 


Juniata 


14 


31 


Bloomsburg 


24 


3 


Dickinson 


2 


14 


Ithaca 


27 


17 


York 


44 


5 


Messiah 





30 


Upsala 


6 


15 


Elizabethtown 


50 


3 


Franklin & Marshall 


2 


35 


Lycoming 


8 


26 


Dickinson 


31 


1 


Wagner 





20 


Delaware Valley 


38 


18 


Lebanon Valley 


42 


2 


Lycoming 


2 


25 


Wagner 


6 


20 


York 


42 


3 


Upsala 


2 


28 


Western Maryland 


8 


15 


Bucknell 


47 


5 


Gettysburg 


2 




Won 6 Lost 3 Tied 




16 


Delaware Valley 


47 





Philadelphia Textile 


6 








19 


Gettysburg 


40 


1 


Wilkes 











19 


Scranton 


44 





Bucknell 


3 




WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY 






Won 11 Lost 1 Tied 







Won 7 Lost 4 Tied 


1 


1 


Bucknell 


3 

















Wilkes 


3 
















1 


Lancaster Club 
Dickinson 




1 




JV FOOTBALL 






JV SOCCER 







Lock Haven 


3 


48 


Lock Haven 


19 


1 


Bucknell 


5 





Shippensburg 


1 


12 


Stevens Trade 


22 


1 


Dickinson 


2 





Penn State 


2 





Lycoming 


21 




Won Lost 2 Tied 





1 


Messiah 


2 


48 


Western Maryland 


19 








1 


Lebanon Valley 
Won Lost 7 Tied 2 


2 


30 


Bucknell 
Won 2 Lost 3 Tied 


44 










28 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Rdvanced degrees 



John H. Anthony '58 earned the 
doctor of education degree from 
Temple University in 1968. He is 
dean of faculty, College of DuPage, 
La Grange. 111. 

Marilyn Zannie Anilines '67 re- 
ceived the master of arts in teaching 
degree from Miami University of 
Ohio, 1969. 

Ronald C. Bacon '65 graduated 
from the Lutheran Theological Sem- 
inary at Philadelphia, 1969, with the 
degree of master of divinity. He 
served his ministerial intern year in 
Resurrection Lutheran Church. Buf- 
falo, N.Y., and has been a student- 
assistant at Holy Cross and Holy 
Communion, Philadelphia, and vicar 
at Our Saviour, Baltimore. Now pas- 
tor of the Brule-Port Wing Lutheran 
Parish in Wisconsin, he married 
Leona LaRose of Rapid River, Mich, 
on April 20, 1968. 

Ruth Botdorj '45 and her sister 
Emily Botdorj Schmalstieg '46, both 
received their doctorates from Penn 
State University in September. Ruth 
earned the Ph.D. in chemistry and is 
teaching chemistry at Penn State's 
Berks Campus. Emily was conferred 
with Ed.D. in music education and 
is teaching music in the State Col- 
lege (Pa.) Area Jr. H.S. The sisters 
earned their master's degrees from 
Columbia University 21 years ago. 

Eugene C. Boughner '64 earned 
the M.S. in education from Bucknell 
University, 1969. He is an instructor 
in German and tutor in chemistry at 
Shamokin (Pa.) Area Joint H.S. Dur- 
ing the summer of 1965 he attended 
Johannes Gutenberg University, 
Mainz, Germany and was a guest of 
the Communists for three days in 
the East Zone. 

Donald H. Bowes '64 was awarded 
the M.A. in dramatic art by the Uni- 
versity of California in June. 

Carl Raymond Bovaird '68 re- 
ceived the master of business ad- 
ministration from the University of 
Pittsburgh in August. 

Monroe A. Bruch '68 was award- 
ed the M.S. degree from Bucknell 
University in August. 

Bonnie Baum Castellion '65 earned 
the master of library science from 
the University of Oklahoma in 1968. 



Lawrence W. Culp '60 received 
the M.A. in personnel and guidance 
at Montclair State College, 1969. 
He is married to the former Kathryn 
Keener '60. 

Ray E. Dice '65 was awarded the 
bachelor of divinity degree from 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Gettysburg, 1969. He was ordained 
June 12 in the Susquehanna Chapel 
Auditorium and is now pastor of 
Christ Church (Ross Township), 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Raymond D. DuBois '65 received 
the B.D. degree from the Theological 
School at Drew University, 1969. 
During his senior year he was a 
probation officer for Westchester 
County, N.Y. 

William P. Forti '65 was grad- 
uated from the Temple University 
School of Medicine with the M.D. 
in June. He is now serving an intern- 
ship at the Reading (Pa.) Hospital. 
Mrs. Forti is the former Christine 
Bach. 

David A. Fuller '61 received the 
M.Ed, degree from Shippensburg 
State College in 1968. 

Dianne Stauffer Gimbi '64 was 
awarded the M.A. with a major in 
education at Lehigh University, 1969. 
She teaches German and English in 
the Weatherly (Pa.) Area Schools 
and also serves as dramatics coach. 

Maryann Paylor Grube '67 was 
awarded the M.Ed, in reading from 
Shippensburg State College, 1969. 
She is teaching 7th and 8th grade 
reading at St. Thomas (Pa.) Jr. 
H.S., Tuscarora School District. 

Paul V. Hartman '65 received the 
M.D. degree at New Jersey College 
of Medicine in June. He is interning 
in surgery at the Mayo Clinic, Ro- 
chester, Minn. Beginning next July 
he plans to continue residency train- 
ing at Yale University School of 
Medicine. 

The Rev. Dwight A. Huseman '57 
was awarded the M.S. degree in li- 
brary science at Drexel Institute of 
Technology. 1969. He is pastor of 
Zion Lutheran Church, Riverside, 
N.J. Mrs. Huseman, the former San- 
dra Kimmel x'60, is a registered 
nurse. 

Naomi Bingaman Kinney '40 



earned the M.A. in remedial read- 
ing from City College of New York, 
1969. She teaches remedial reading in 
the Harrison (N.Y.) School System. 
Her husband, Kenneth R. '40, is a 
guidance counselor in the same 
system. 

Raymond W. Klinger '66 received 
the master of science from Bucknell 
University in June. 

Elizabeth Shintay Le Anderson '67 
earned the master of music educa- 
tion degree in June from Michigan 
State University. 

Frank J. Leber '64 was graduated 
from the University of Pittsburgh 
School of Law in 1967 with a bache- 
lor of laws degree, but pursuant to 
revised standards adopted by the 
school, he has since been awarded 
a Juris Doctorate. He is an attorney 
with the Office of the General Coun- 
sel of the U.S. Department of Agri- 
culture, assigned to the Regional 
Office for the Northeast United 
States, located in Harrisburg. 

Robert J. MacNamara '53 received 
the Ed.D. from Penn State Univer- 
sity, 1969. He is assistant professor 
of secondary education and super- 
visor of student teachers at Kent 
State University. 

Barry I. Markowitz x'64 earned 
the bachelor of laws degree from 
Rutgers School of Law in 1967. 
Since that time, however, Rutgers 
has abolished the LL.B. and replaced 
it with the Juris Doctor degree, 
which he has therefore been given. 
He maintains his own law offices in 
Chester and East Orange, N.J. Mar- 
ried to the former Miriam Brown 
'63, Attorney Markowitz holds the 
B.A. from Lafayette College. 

The Rev. Ronald H. McClung '60 
received the master of sacred theol- 
ogy degree in biblical studies and 
pastoral psychology from the Luth- 
eran Theological Seminary at Gettys- 
burg, 1969. Now pastor of Gloria 
Dei Lutheran Church, Pontiac, Mich., 
and Lutheran student pastor at Oak- 
land University, he plans to pursue 
a Ph.D. program at the University of 
Michigan. Pastor McClung and wife 
Doris Ann have two children — Deb- 
orah Joy, 4 months, and David 
Steven, 3Vi. 

Jane L. McCormick '66 received 
the M.A. degree in modern English 
literature from Simon Fraser Uni- 
versity. Burnaby, British Columbia, 
and has had several articles pub- 
lished. She has an English teaching 



FALL 1969 



29 



assistantship and is working toward 
the Ph.D. at Lehigh University. 

The Rev. Foster R. McCurley Jr. 
'59 was awarded the Ph.D degree 
in Assyriology from the Dropsie Col- 
lege of Hebrew and Cognate Learn- 
ing, Philadelphia, and was recently 
elected president of the American 
Committee for the Rhein Mission — 
centered in Germany and concerned 
with missionary work primarily in 
South West Africa, Indonesia, and 
Hong Kong. Dr. McCurley's book 
"Exodus." written for the LCA Adult 
Christian Education Series, has been 
published by Lutheran Church Press. 

Harriet Could Mertz '48 earned 
the specialist in education degree with 
a major in education. She is choral 
music director of South Miami (Fla.) 
Jr. H.S., where her husband, John R. 
'49 is assistant principal in charge of 
curriculum. 

Lyman 1. Milroy '62 received the 
M.S. from Bucknell University in 
June. He is teaching mathematics at 
Williamsport Area Community Col- 
lege. 

Carl M. Mover '63 earned the 
M.S. degree in education at Bucknell 
University in June. 

Dennis R. Mycluik '65 earned his 
M.D. at the Stritch School of Medi- 
cine, Chicago. 111. He completed an 
externship at the Holy Cross Hos- 
pital in Chicago and is now serving 
his internship at Memorial Hospital, 
Johnstown, Pa. He plans to enter 
general practice. 

Thomas L. Myers '65 received the 
bachelor of divinity degree from the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Gettysburg in May. 

Robert M. Newbury '65 passed the 
C.P.A. examination in 1968 and is 
a senior accountant for Ralph Wm. 
Wire, certified public accountants of 
Camp Hill, Pa. He also is a P.I.A.A. 
football and basketball official; col- 
lege basketball official, C.B.O.A.; and 
director of youth and sports for the 
Paxton Area Jaycees. 

Gary W. Owens '65 received the 
B.D. degree from Gettysburg Theo- 
logical Seminary in May and was 
ordained June 12 in the Susque- 
hanna Chapel Auditorium. He has 
been installed as associate pastor of 
the Buffalo Lutheran Parish, includ- 
ing St. John's, Lewisburg; New Co- 
lumbia, Mazeppa; and Trinity, Co- 
wan, Pa. The Rev. Walter L. Bran- 
dau '51 conducted the installation. 

Gail Kantrowitz Phelps '68 re- 



ceived her M.A. in Latin from Bryn 
Mawr College in June. Her husband, 
Frederick L. Ill '68 is an accountant 
with Haskins & Sells. Philadelphia. 
Address: R.D. 1, Allentown Rd.. 
Lansdale, Pa. 19446. 

Michael P. Ranch '66 received his 
M.B.A. degree in August from the 
University of South Carolina, where 
his wife, the former Dorothy Weis- 
nuin '66, also did graduate work. 
They are now living at 844 Hem- 
lock St., Franklin Square, N.Y. 
11010. 




The Rauches at Homecoming. 



Edwin L. Rehmeyer '66 earned the 
M.Ed, at Shippensburg State College, 
1969. He majored in elementary edu- 
cation and during the current school 
year is active in a team-teaching in- 
dividualized instruction program with 
sixth grade students, West York 
(Pa.) Area Schools. 

Blairanne Hoover Revak '65 re- 
ceived the M.D. degree from Wo- 
man's Medical College of Pennsyl- 
vania in June and is serving her 
internship at Germantown Dispensary 
Hospital. Her husband, David J. '65, 
is a third-year medical student at 
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic 
Medicine. They are the parents of a 
daughter. Heather. 

Richard W. Rumbel '64 was grad- 
uated from Georgetown University 
School of Dentistry in June and is en- 
gaged in private practice in Conyng- 
ham. Pa. He is married to the former 
Audrey Dietrich and they are par- 
ents of a son, Mark Stephen, 7. 

Kenneth R. Sausman Jr. '67 earned 
the M.S. from Miami University of 
Ohio, 1969. He is now an instructor 
in mathematics at Lycoming College. 

Steven L. Seitz '65 received the 
B.D. degree from the Lutheran Theo- 
logical Seminary at Gettysburg in 



May. He and his wife, the former 
Carole Kno.x '64, are living at 3414 
Brinkley Rd. #102, Oxon Hill, Md. 
20031. 

Elwood B. Starr x'62 was awarded 
the B.S. in forestry engineering and 
the B.S. in forestry management, 
1969, as a member of the Centen- 
nial Graduating Class of Oregon 
State University. A U.S. Navy vet- 
eran, he has accepted a position with 
the U.S. Forest Service in Peters- 
burg. Alaska. 

Ann L. Staufjenberg '68 earned 
the master's degree in library science 
at Columbia University in June. Now 
a manuscript cataloger at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, she is pursuing 
an additional master's in history. 

Harry C. Strine HI '64 received 
the M.A. degree in general speech 
from the School of Communication, 
Department of Inter-Personal Com- 
munication, Ohio University at Ath- 
ens, 1969. He also did graduate work 
at American University and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Harry is a 
speech arid English teacher in the 
Shamokin (Pa.) Area H.S. and serves 
as yearbook adviser and debate 
coach. 

Lynn Oelkers Talbot '66 received 
the M.A. in music from Trenton 
State College, 1969. She teaches 
vocal and instrumental music, grades 
K-8, at Oxford (N.J.) Central School 
and sings with the Shawnee Press 
Choir. Her husband, Richard E. '66, 
is manager of the Firestone Store, 
Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Jacquelyn Weakley Toy '61 earned 
the master of library science degree 
from Kent State University, 1969. 
She is the wife of Dr. Stephen T. 
'61 and the couple have a daughter, 
Deborah. 

David M. Wilkinson x'65 earned 
his M.D. from the New York Uni- 
versity School of Medicine in June. 
He is interning at the University of 
Wisconsin Hospital in Madison where 
he hopes also to spend a year of 
residency in internal medicine. 

John Yanuklis '60 received the 
M.B.A. degree in June from Fair- 
Ieigh Dickinson University. He is 
with the department of sales for the 
U.S. Gypsum Co. and covers the 
Connecticut territory. 

Suzanne Springer Zeok '66 earned 
the M.D. degree from Jefferson Med- 
ical College, Philadelphia, 1969, and 
is interning at Lancaster (Pa.) Gen- 
eral Hospital. 



30 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



"J dO" 



LABANOSKY-STOCKALIS 

Barbara Ann Stockalis '64 to John 
P. Labanosky Jr.. August 26, 1967. 
Mr. Labanosky is with the Depart- 
ment of the Army. Barbara is work- 
ing toward her M.A. in English at 
Villanova University and teaching 
mathematics at Charles H. Boehm 
H.S., Yardley, Pa. The couple resides 
at 21 Patricia Lane. Levittown, Pa. 
19057. 

KOSTERLITZ-ROTHERMEL 

Judith Rothermel '64 to Herbert 
A. Kosterlitz. September 30. 1967. 
Judith is head of fashion merchandis- 
ing and interior decorating and de- 
sign at the Kathy Lords School, 
Providence. Address of the couple is 
234 President Ave., Providence. R.I. 
02906. 

LICHTY-MURRAY 

Carol Murray to 2/Lt. Michael W. 
Lichty '68, December 22. 1967. 
Michael is a navigator trainee, sta- 
tioned at Mather AFB, Calif. 
MORRIS-DRAKE 

Joanne E. Drake '66 to Jerold L. 
Morris, July 13, 1968. Mr. Morris is 
with Merck. Sharp and Dohme. North 
Wales, and Joanne teaches senior 
high English in Lansdale. The couple 
resides at 17-K Pennbrooke Apts., 
North Wales, Pa. 19454. 

CASTELLION-BAUM 

Bonnie Lou Baum '65 to Donald 
G. Castellion. August 10. 1968, St. 
John's Lutheran Church, Auburn, 
Pa. Mr. Castellion, who holds an 
M.S. in business from the University 
of Oklahoma, is a junior accountant 
for the North American Rockwell 
Corp., Pittsburgh. Bonnie earned her 
M.L.S. at Oakland and is children's 
librarian at the Carnegie Library. 
Address of the couple: Box 243-A. 
R.D. #1, Trafford, Pa. 15085. 
BOWES-TYLER 

Ariane Tyler to Donald H. Bowes 
'64, September 14, 1968, Davis Com- 
munity Church. University of Cali- 
fornia, Davis Campus. Don served 
with the U.S. Army in Germany for 
two years and completed the re- 
quirements for the M.A. in dramatic 
art at the University of California. 
The couple resides at 2542 Sacra- 
mento St.. San Francisco. Calif. 
94115. 



SEIFERT-REDMOND 

Lynn Lesley Redmond to Lt. (jg) 
Gary R. Seifert '67, November 23, 
1968, Navy Base Chapel, Long Beach, 
Calif. Gary is attending school for 
six months and his wife has been 
secretary for a California State Sena- 
tor. Address: Staff Officers Course, 
NAVSCOLMINE Warfare, Charles- 
ton. S.C. 29408. 

STRANG-McCARTHY 

Kennelha Alice McCarthy '65 to 
Edward Ernest Strang x'65, Decem- 
ber 14. 1968, St. Pius X Church, 
Middletown, Conn. A graduate of La- 
Salle College in 1967, Ed is on an 
executive training program with the 
Philadelphia National Bank. Ken- 
netha is employed at Temple Uni- 
versity Health Service Center in the 
Endocrinology Department. The 
couple is residing at Apt. 112, Glen- 
hardie Apts., Wayne, Pa. 19087. 
MARSH-FORD 

Holly Smith Ford '69 to Lt. (jg) 
Frank Douglas Marsh '67, January 
25, 1969, First Lutheran Church. Al- 
toona. Pa. The Rev. Alfred A. Am- 
brose '65 assisted at the ceremony. 
Beverly Walker Bortz x'67, served 
as matron of honor. Glennette Peter- 
son (Papovich) '69 as maid of honor, 
and Linda Whitenight '69 as a brides- 
maid. Thomas Buttimer '67 was best 
man and ushers included Robert 
Bortz '67. Jack Campbell '67. Ronald 
Jackson '67, and Robert Miller '67. 
Susan Stephan Hill '69 was organist. 
Lenorc Knupp '68 was the soloist, 
and Randy Gehret '69 was trumpeter. 
Frank is a damage control instructor 
at the Philadelphia Naval Base and 
Holly is teaching music in the area. 
The couple lives at Brookview Manor 
J-75. Stratford, N.J. 08084. 

STANKIEWICZ-GRILL 

Linda Elise Grill '69 to John 
Joseph Stankiewicz '67. John is a 
general science teacher and assistant 
track coach in the Lansdowne-Aldan 
Joint School System, Lansdowne, Pa. 
Linda teaches 7th and 8th grade 
language arts and reading. Penn- 
sauken (N.J.) H.S. Address: Haver- 
ford Manor Apt. A-l, 371 Lane 
Ave., Haverford, Pa. 19041. 

HYDE-SCHWEIGHOFER 

Rita Schweighojer '49 to E. H. 
Bud Hyde. August 26, 1967. Mr. 
Hyde is a missionary-engineer with 
Wycliffe Bible Translators. Rita, who 
formerly worked in Germany and 
Austria with European Evangelistic 
Crusaders, is teaching in the Amazon 



Valley H.S. Address: Cx. P. 181, 
Belem, Para, Brazil. 

RODGERS-ASQUITH 

Kate Holway Asquith to James 
Alden Rodgers '64, March 20, 1969, 
Church of the Abiding Presence at 
the Lutheran Theological Seminary. 
Gettysburg. Kenneth E. Linger '63 
and the Rev. James R. Bramer '64 
were ushers. Jim. who did graduate 
work at Indiana University of Penn- 
sylvania and taught English at 
Shanksville-Stonycreek H.S., is en- 
rolled at the Seminary. His wife, a 
graduate of Gettysburg College, is 
working on her master's in elementary 
education at Shippensburg State Col- 
lege. 

KRAMER-SUTCLIFFE 

Carol Ann Sutclilje '68 to Wil- 
liam D. Kramer '67, April 19, 1969, 
St. Luke's Lutheran Church, Devon, 
Pa. Serving as attendants were San- 
dra Woolston Gross x'69, Linda 
Baehr "68. Ellen Hill '68 and Ann 
Sheppard x'68. Ushers were Thomas 
Eggleston HI '69, Ronald Williams 
'67, Michael Cuzzolina '67. Charles 
France '67, and Alan Lenig '67. Bill 
is a senior accountant with Price Wat- 
erhouse & Co.. Philadelphia. Carol is 
Lay Associate with the Board of 
American Missions of the Lutheran 
Church in America in Philadelphia. 
The couple's address is Rydal Apts. 
301-E. Jenkintown, Pa. 19046. 
SPENCER-McCREA 

Mary Jane McCrea '67 to Stanley 
Loomis Spencer Jr., May 1969, First 
United Presbyterian Church, New- 
ville. Pa. Nancy Took Salomon '64 
served as an attendant, Robert Salo- 
mon '64 was best man and Andrew 
McCrea '72 was an usher. Mr. Spen- 
cer, a graduate of Dickinson College, 
is a dairy farmer in Cumberland 
County. Mary Jane teaches English 
and journalism at the Carlisle (Pa.) 
H.S. 

PADULA-PEARCE 

Nancy Jean Pearce to Dr. Anthony 
Michael Padula '63, May 10, 1969, 
St. John of the Cross Church. Ros- 
lyn. Pa. Tony is doing a residency 
at Jefferson Medical College, Phila- 
delphia, in post graduate surgery. 
Mrs. Padula graduated from the 
Chestnut Hill Hospital School of 
Nursing. The couple is living in 
Glenside. Pa. 

GRIMES-WAR 

Evelyn A. War '68 to Ralph S. 
Grimes. May 17. 1969, Christ Church. 
Presbyterian, Burlington, Vt. Willard 



FALL 1969 



31 



M. Grimes III '68, brother of the 
groom, served as best man. Marian L. 
Shatto '67 was vocal soloist and Judi 
Lloyd Famous '67, guitarist. Mr. 
Grimes is teaching physics at the 
Appleton Academy and Evelyn is 
completing her M.A. in music at the 
University of Vermont. Address: 
Appleton Academy, New Ipswich, 
N.H. 03071. 

LUCAS-McAULIFFE 

Susann McAulifje '66 to Guerrino 
Lucas. May 17, 1969. Ann McAulifje 
Darr '66 served as matron of honor 
for her twin sister and Lewis Darr 
'65 was an usher. Mr. Lucas at- 
tended Rider College and is regional 
sales manager for Levitt and Sons, 
Willingboro. Sue has been a case- 
worker at The Bancroft School, for 
retarded children, in Haddonfield. 
The couple resides at Kings Highway 
Towers. Apt. C-302, Maple Shade, 
N.J. 08052. 

SERVAES-MANNING 

Ma.xine M. Manning '68 to Ray- 
mond F. Servaes, May 17. 1969, 
Nevil Memorial Church of Saint 
George, Ardmore, Pa. Mr. Servaes is 
a pilot with Cape and Islands Air- 
lines, flying out of Hyannis. and 
Maxine is with the Commercial and 
Investment Division of a South 
Shore real estate firm. Address: 59 
Summer St., Plymouth, Mass. 02360. 
HERROLD-SHAFFER 

Lana Jean Shaffer x'71 to David 
Eugene Herrold, June 1, 1969, Christ 
United Methodist Church. Selins- 
grove, Pa. Mr. Herrold, a graduate 
of Williamsport Area Community 
College and aviation school in 
Memphis, Tenn., is a petty officer 
serving in the U.S. Coast Guard. The 
couple lives at R.D. #7, Mobile, Ala. 
36606. 

LEIDEL-PATTERSON 

Alice Ann Paterson '58 to William 
Leidel Jr., June 1969. Mr. Leidel is 
president and chief executive officer 
of Leidel Corp., Farmingdale, N.Y. 
Alice Ann has been teaching music 
at Sachem Central School District. 
Lake Ronkonkoma, Long Island, and 
is nearing completion of her Ph.D. 
in music education at New York 
University. Address of the couple is 
73 Melanie Lane, Syosset, N.Y. 
11791. 

BALLIET-STRYKER 

Barbara Stryker to Robert Frank- 
lin Balliet Jr. '69, June 7, 1969. 
Robert is a staff accountant for Ly- 
brand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery, 



Philadelphia. The couple lives at Apt. 
201 -A Thornbrook Manor, 819 Mont- 
gomery Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 19010. 
CARL-ARBOGAST 

Rhonda M. Abrogast to Michael 
L. Carl '70, June 7, 1969, St. Paul's 
United Church of Christ, Selins- 
grove. Randy Gehrel '69 was best 
man and included among the ushers 
were Richard Semkc '69 and Richard 
Workman '69. Peggy Haas '71 served 
as organist. Mike serves as organist 
at St. Paul's and is completing his 
senior year at S.U. Mrs. Carl at- 
tended Williamsport Area Community 
College. Address of the couple is 351 
S. Market St., Selinsgrove. 

HOWARD-HOUDESHEL 

Linda I. Houdeshel '67 to John 
Stephen Howard, June 7, 1969, Stev- 
ens Memorial United Methodist 
Church, Harrisburg, Pa. Sue L. Evans 
'65 served as maid of honor. Mr. 
Howard is with Berg Electronics, 
Inc. and Linda is a teacher in the 
Lower Dauphin School District, Har- 
risburg. The couple resides at 202 
Herman Ave., Lemoyne, Pa. 17043. 
MATTIS-HIGGINS 

Jodie Ann Higgins to Jeffrey Al- 
lan Matris '69, June 7, 1969, Trinity 
Lutheran Church, Selinsgrove, Pa. 
Richard Winters '69 and Ricky Bair 
'69 were ushers. Jeff is pursuing grad- 
uate study in chemistry at Purdue 
University. Address: 207-7 Airport 
Rd.. West Lafayette, Ind. 47907. 
ROGERS-WALTZ 

Sandra K. Waltz x'7 1 to 2/Lt. Wil- 
liam C. Rogers. June 9, 1969, Trinity 
Lutheran Church. Hughesville, Pa. 
Lt. Rogers is a graduate of the U.S. 
Naval Academy. Sandy is presently 
a secretary and plans to complete her 
undergraduate education. Address: 
c/o 2/Lt. William C. Rogers 0110514, 
Quarters 293 1-C, Marine Corps Base, 
Quantico, Va. 22134. 

BAYLOR-ALSPACH 

Barbara Ann Alspach to Gary Eu- 
gene Baylor '69, June 14, 1969, 
Christ's Lutheran Church, Lewis- 
burg. The Rev. Dr. Henry H. Cassler 
'34 officiated at the ceremony. Gary 
is associate manager for Farmers' 
Best, Inc., Lewisburg, Pa. Mrs. Bay- 
lor is a graduate of Mansfield State 
College, candidate for the master's 
degree at Penn State, and teaching 
vocal music at Selinsgrove H.S. Ad- 
dress: 41 S. Fourth St., Lewisburg, 
Pa. 17837. 

BOOK-ESH 

Elizabeth Irene Esh to Gerald Les- 



ter Book '69, June 14, 1969, United 
Methodist Church, Port Royal, Pa. 
Richard Pfeifer '69 served as best 
man and ushers included Michael 
Dreyfus '67, John Remsen '69 and 
Raymond Berry '69. Gerald is an 
executive management trainee for 
Sears, Roebuck & Co., Warwick, R.I. 
The couple resides at 156 Spooner 
Ave., Warwick, R.I. 02887. 
FENG-YIN 

Celia S. T. Yin to Dr. Paul Feng, 
June 14. 1969, Bethany Lutheran 
Church. Montoursville, Pa. Dr. 
Feng, a former member of the S.U. 
faculty, is a postdoctoral fellow at 
Yale University. He is professor of 
psychology and sociology at Williams- 
port Area Community College and 
staff psychologist in the Cleft Palate 
Clinic of the Williamsport Hospital. 
Mrs. Feng was graduated from Na- 
tional Taiwan Normal University and 
is a candidate for the M.S. at Tufts 
University. 

FISHER-BROWN 

Janice Louise Brown '69 to David 
R. Fisher", June 14, 1969, 29th Street 
United Methodist Church, Harris- 
burg, Pa. Dexter N. Weikel '48 
served as organist and Melinda Mark 
'69 was one of the soloists. Virginia 
Weatherhy '69 was maid of honor 
and Glennette Peterson (Papovich) 
'69, Susan Stephan '69 and Linda 
Whitenight '69 were among the 
bridesmaids. Mr. Fisher is a graduate 
degree candidate at Hamma School 
of Theology. Wittenberg University 
and Janice is teaching 9th and 10th 
grade English and drama at Grunon 
H.S.. Springfield. The couple resides 
at 472!/2 N. Wittenberg Ave., Spring- 
field, Ohio 45504. 

GREY-FOWLER 

Janet Katherine Fowler '68 to 
Richard William Grey '69, June 14. 
1969, Logan Baptist Church, Glen- 
side, Pa. Among those taking part 
in the wedding were Barbara Brought 
'68, Susan Fuellhcirt '69. C. Max 
Weiss '69, Dean Ross '69, Robert 
Balliet '69, George Kranich HI x'69, 
and Gregory Jeffrey '71. Richard is 
a materials analyst for Mobil Corp. 
and Janet was with Fidelity Mutual 
Life Insurance. Philadelphia, as li- 
brarian and manual analyst. Address: 
2 Primrose Lane, Apt. 3-M, Fords. 
N.J. 08863. 

JOBSON-BEDEAUX 

Claudette V. Bedeaux x'59 to J. 
Robert Jobson. June 14. 1969. Faith 
Lutheran Church. Arlington, Va. 



32 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Claudette is the stepdaughter and 
daughter of Dr. John J. '08 and Ar- 
line Fisher Bedeaux Houtz '27, and 
the granddaughter of the late Dr. 
Charles A. Fisher '29. She had been 
a secretary for the U.S. Government. 
Central Intelligence Agency. Wash- 
ington. D.C. Sgt. Johson is on a new- 
assignment with the Weather Service 
of the U.S. Air Force. The couple 
resides at 41 E. Parkway, Chanute 
AFB, Rantoul. 111. 61866. 

REINHART-GOGLIA 

Joanne Debra Goglia '68 to Kurt 
Reinhart '69, June 14, 1969, St. Rose 
of Lima Church. Short Hills. N.J. 
Cynthia Piatt Taylor '68 was the 
matron of honor. June Funk '68 
served as a bridesmaid and Richard 
Collins '69 was best man. Kurt is 
a graduate student in marine biology 
at the University of Delaware and 
Joanne is an English teacher at 
Christiana H.S., Newark, Del. The 
couple resides at Apt. K-2, 644 Le- 
high Rd., Newark, Del. 19711. 
STRINE-BOLIG 

Mary Ann Bolig to Harry C. Strine 
III '64. June 14. 1969, Trinity Luth- 
eran Church. Selinsgrove. Linford 
O\erholt '64 served as best man and 
among the ushers were Eugene 
Boughner '64 and John C. Troutman 
'66. Harry is an English and Speech 
teacher for the Shamokin Area 
School District. His wife graduated 
from the Harrisburg Polyclinic Hos- 
pital School of Nursing and attended 
Syracuse University. The couple 
lives at 1533 W. Lynn St., Shamokin. 
Pa. 17872. 

SWOPE-BLESSING 

Beth Blessing to Benjamin H. 
Swope '66, June 14, 1969, St. Phillip 
Neri Church, Lafayette Hill, Pa. 
Eugene Shotsberger '67 was an usher. 
Ben is a senior accountant for Ly- 
brand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery, 
Philadelphia. The couple resides at 
Haddenview Apts. East, Apt. 509, 1 1 
McArthur Blvd.. Westmont, N.J. 
08108. 

WILSON-RITTER 

Linda L. Ritter to Donald H. Wil- 
son '69, June 14, 1969, Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, Beavertown, Pa. 
Larry Sidoia '69 served as an usher. 
Don is a systems and planning 
trainee with Girard Trust, Philadel- 
phia. Address of the couple is 1428-B 
Rolling Glen Drive, Boothwyn, Pa. 
19061. 

JENKINS-GREGORY 

Margaret Emily Gregory '67 to F. 



FALL 1969 



Stuart Jenkins, June 1969. Margaret 
was a food organizer for overland 
expeditions to India in 1967 and 
1968 and prior to her marriage was 
a librarian in Wilkes-Barre. Pa. The 
couple resides at 3 The Green, Lol- 
vvorth, Cambridge. England. 
AIKEN-BRANDT 

Dr. Elinor Agnes Brandt x'60 to 
Edwin H. Aiken Jr., June 15, 1969. 
United Community Church, Glen- 
dale, Calif. Mr. Aiken, a graduate of 
the University of Arizona, is a re- 
search engineer for Lockheed in Bur- 
bank. Elinor is veterinarian at a small 
animal hospital in San Gabriel, Calif. 
The couple resides at 411 E. Broad- 
way =3. San Gabriel. Calif. 91776. 
DERR-WAGNER 

Donna Jean Wagner to Robert 
Charles Derr '70, June 15, 1969, 
Lutheran Church, Mifninburg, Pa. 
Peter Cuozzo '70 was best man and 
Terry Phillips '70 was an usher. 
Robert is completing his senior year 
at S.U. and Donna is a cosmetologist 
at Mr. Michael Beauty Salon, Lewis- 
burg. The couple lives at 221 N. 
Third St., Lewisburg, Pa. 17837. 
McKEE-YOST 

Brenda Jolene Yost '67 to Ray- 
mond Eugene McKee '69, June 15, 
1969, St. Paul's Church, Hanover, 
Pa. Pamela Merbreier '69 was one 
of the bridesmaids and Kenneth 
Stoker '68 was an usher. Ray is pur- 
suing a doctorate in biochemistry at 
Purdue University, where he is also 
an instructor in chemistry. Brenda 
teaches English in the Attica Con- 
solidated School Corp., Lafayette. 
Address of the couple is 59 Owen 
St.. Lafayette, Ind. 47905. 

MARTIN-WOODRUFF 

Mrs. Loretta Woodruff to Dr. 
Basil F. Martin x'28, June 18. 1969, 
Richmond, Va. Dr. Martin is an 
osteopathic physician. Mrs. Martin 
served as financial secretary for the 
Women's Auxiliary of Susquehanna 
University. The couple is residing at 
226— 18th Ave. N.E., St. Petersburg, 
Fla. 33704. 

STERNER-GRAY 

Anne Elizabeth Gray to John 
Weeks Sterner x'69, June 20, 1969. 
Covenant Central United Presby- 
terian Church. Williamsport, Pa. Mi- 
chael Barrile '69. Charles E. Clout- 
man '69 and Richard Pfeifer '69 
served as ushers. John was grad- 
uated from Tarkio College in Mis- 
souri and his wife from Penn State. 
The couple is residing in Denver, 



Colo., where they are training for the 
VISTA program. 

ARTHUR-LANDIS 

Sarah Ann Landis x'70 to John 
Charles Arthur '69, June 21, 1969, 
at the home of the bride in Selins- 
grove. John is training as a person- 
nel manager for Sears, Roebuck & 
Co.. Buffalo. Sarah is a graduate of 
the Empire Beauty School, has op- 
erator's and teacher's licenses in 
cosmetology, and a diploma from 
L-Oreal de Paris. The couple resides 
at 130 Hartwell Rd., Buffalo, NY. 
14216. 

ARTHUR-GATES 

Sandra K. Gates to /. Robert 
Arthur '67. June 21. 1969, St. Paul's 
Cathedral, Akron, Ohio. Bob is a 
tax accountant for Ernst & Ernst, 
Pittsburgh. His wife, who attended 
Akron University, is a nuclear medi- 
cine laboratory technician at Subur- 
ban General Hospital. The couple 
resides at 605 Bellevue Terrace. Pitts- 
burg, Pa: 15202. 



FOR WALLET OR PURSE 
Clip out and save this handy schedule 
card — follow the Crusaders at home 
and away. 



Susquehanna University 

1 969-70 
Winter Sports Schedules 

VARSITY BASKETBALL 



D 3 


Lycoming 


A 


D 6 


Wilkes 


H 


D 8 


Dickinson 


H 


D 10 


Scranton 


H 


D 13 


Wagner 


H 


D 19 


Wilkes 


A 


D 27- 


28 Ft. Eustis Tournament A 


J 8 


Juniata 


A 


J 10 


Delaware Valley 


A 


J 12 


Albright 


H 


J 14 


Philadelphia Textile 


H 


F 4 


Albright 


A 


F 7 


Elizabethtown 


H 


F 11 


Juniata 


H 


F 13 


Wagner 


A 


F 14 


Upsala 


A 


F 17 


York 


A 


F 19 


Scranton 


A 


F 20 


Westminster 


H 


F 24 


Messiah 


A 


F 25 


York 
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 


H 


F 3 


Wilkes 


A 


F 6 


Millersville 


A 


F 10 


Mary wood 


H 


F 17 


Luzerne C.C.C. 


A 


F 19 


Albright 


H 


F 25 


Bloomsburg 


H 


F 28 


Lebanon Valley 


A 



AYER-MOWERS 

Patricia Ann Mowers '69 to En- 
sign John Warren Ayer Jr. '68, June 
21, 1969. Shirley Jones '69, Harriet 
Horn '69, and Ann Ellis '69 served as 
attendants. James Kelso '69 and 
Greg Ballentine '68 were ushers. 
John is a USN air intelligence offi- 
cer and Patricia is a substitute teach- 
er in the Aurora (Colo.) Public 
Schools. Address of the couple is 
1205 Yosemite St., Apt. #3, Denver, 
Colo. 80220. 

HEBERLIG-FAY 

Victoria Angela Fay '69 to David 
Heberlig, June 21. 1969. Victoria is 
an elementary instrumental music 
teacher in the Cheltenham School 
District. Elkins Park. Pa. Address: 
Apt. C-210, Cheltenham Terrace. 
Church Rd.. Wyncote. Pa. 19095. 
TRIBLE-HOEHLER 

Nancy Jean Hoehler '66 to C. J. 
Trible, June 1969. The couple re- 
sides at 141 Greenbrook Rd., Green- 
brook. N.J. 08812. 

CHONKO-LOCKHART 

Nancy Lockhart x'70 to Robert 
J. Chonko '68. June 28, 1969. Bob 
is a teacher at Spring Cove Jr. H.S. 
The couple lives at 930 Chestnut St., 
Roaring Springs. Pa. 16673. 





WRESTLING 




D 6 


Washington 


H 


D 10 


Eastern Baptist 


A 


J 10 


Wagner 


H 


J 13 


Bucknell 


A 


F 7 


Delaware Valley 


H 


F 11 


Lebanon Valley 


H 


F 14 


American 


A 


F 21 


Philadelphia Bible 


A 


F 25 


Juniata 


A 


F 28 


Dickinson 

JV BASKETBALL 


H 


D 3 


Lycoming 


A 


D 6 


Wilkes 


H 


D 8 


Dickinson 


H 


D 10 


Scranton 


H 


D 11 


Bucknell 


A 


D 13 


Williamsport 






Commerce 


H 


D 19 


Wilkes 


A 


J 8 


Juniata 


A 


J 10 


Delaware Valley 


A 


J 12 


Albright 


H 


J 14 


Philadelphia Textile 


H 


F 4 


Albright 


A 


F 7 


Elizabethtown 


H 


F 11 


Juniata 


H 


F 17 


York 


H 


F 19 


Scranton 


A 


F 20 


Stevens Trade 


H 


F 24 


Messiah 


A 


F 25 


York 


H 



HALLDEN-GOVER 

Loye Lorraine Gover '68 to Philip 
A. Hallden x'68, June 28, 1969, 
Grace Lutheran Church, Sunbury. 
Philip attended Colorado State Uni- 
versity and is a salesman for Dieges 
and Clust, specialty jewelry, in the 
Pittsburgh area. Loye is a French 
teacher in the Jeanette School Dis- 
trict. Address of the couple is 326 
Harrison Ave.. Greensburg, Pa. 
15601. 

LeANDERSON-SHINTAY 

Elizabeth Sue Shintay '67 to P. 
James LeAnderson. June 28, 1969, 
Holy Trinity Slovak Lutheran Church, 
New York City. Patricia Shintay 
Spotts '64 served as matron of honor 
and Douglas Spotts '63 was an usher. 
Mr. LeAnderson is studying for his 
doctoral degree in geology at Queen's 
University. Kingston, Ontario, and 
Elizabeth teaches elementary music 
in two schools in Kingston Town- 
ship, Frontenac County Board of 
Education. Address of the couple is 
111 Notch Hill Rd. #309. Kingston. 
Ontario. Canada. 

NACE-BARNHART 

Joan Elizabeth Ann Barnhart to 
James Ray Nace 70, June 28, 1969, 
St. John's United Methodist Church. 
Sunbury. Jim will graduate from 
S.U. in January. Joan is a graduate 
of the Empire Beauty School and is 
associated with her mother in their 
beauty shop. Address of the couple 
is 119 Chestnut St., Sunbury, Pa. 
17801. 

KELLEY-WITTOSCH 

Judith Ann Wittosch '69 to John 
David Kelley Jr. '68, June 29, 1969, 
St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church. 
Rutherford, N.J. Donna Hilton '69 
and Harriet Horn '69 served as 
bridesmaids. David Newhart '66 was 
best man and Jeffrey Noble '68 was 
an usher. Dave is serving with the 
U.S. Army and in January will be 
stationed in Vietnam. Judy is secretary 
to an elementary school principal in 
Columbus, Ga. Present address: 4042 
Macon Rd., Columbus, Ga. 31907. 
VELISHKA-DAYTON 

Cynthia Dayton x'66 to Martin 
John Velishka, summer 1969. Cyn- 
thia was graduated from Tampa 
University and is teaching art in 
North Andover H.S. The couple lives 
at 534 Chickering Rd. North And- 
over, Mass. 01845. 

HATFIELD-McCAFFREY 

Kathryn A. McCaffrey to Cort- 
land M. Hatfield '65. July 5, 1969. 



Dr. Alan Bachrach '64 was an usher. 
Mrs. Hatfield received the master's 
degree from the University of Mich- 
igan and Cortland earned his at 
lona College. Both are teaching Eng- 
lish at Clarkstown Jr. H.S., West 
Nyack, N.Y. The couple resides at 25 
Berkeley Square, Suffern, N.Y. 10901. 
SABORIO-McCULLOUGH 

Nancy J. McCulloiigh '56 to Carlos 
L. Saborio, July 5, 1969, Lakewood 
Presbyterian Church, Lakewood, 
Ohio. Mr. Saborio is in the research 
laboratory of Avisun Corp., Marcus 
Hook, Pa. and Nancy is a secretary 
for Sun Oil Co. The couple resides 
at 137 Princeton Ave., Apt. D-4, 
Claymont, Del. 19703. 

JONES-GRIFFIN 

Ann W. Griffin '68 to William J. 
Jones Jr. '70. July 7, 1969. Bill is 
completing his senior year and Ann 
is with the Department of Public 
Assistance. Selinsgrove. The couple 
lives at 301 E. Walnut St., Selins- 
grove. Pa. 17870. 

PAGE-BRAHOSKY 

Terri Brahosky to James W. Page 
'69, July 12. 1969, Jim is teaching 
7th grade geography at the Selins- 
grove Area School District and as- 
sisting with the varsity football team. 
The couple resides at Rear 108 
Broad St., Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870. 
CORALLO-KLINGERMAN 

Eleanor Ann Klingerman '64 to 
Charles John Corallo, July 26, 1969, 
The First Presbyterian Church, Mor- 
risville. Pa. Margaret Simon '64 
served as one of the bridesmaids. 
Eleanor is teaching music in the 
Parma (Ohio) Schools. The couple 
resides in Cleveland. 

KNAUER-KELLER 

Paillette Marie Keller '69 to Wil- 
liam Charles Knaucr x'72. July 26, 
1969, St. Mark's Lutheran Church. 
Harrisburg. Pa. Sharon Bankert '69 
and Nancy Comp '69 were brides- 
maids. Bill served four years in the 
U.S. Navy, including a tour of duty 
in Vietnam. He is now with the Gen- 
eral Battery and Ceramics Co., Read- 
ing, Pa. 

BADGLEY-KOHL 

Lois M. Kohl '59 to Bruce T. 
Badgley. August 1969. The couple 
lives at 32 Poole Ave.. Avon, N.J. 
07717. 

BURNS-NOLL 

Karen Noll to Thomas Gary Burns 
'73, August 2. 1969, St. Andrew's 
United Methodist Church, Milton. 
Pa. Kenneth Dill '72 was an usher. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Address: 504 Mahoning St., Milton, 
Pa. 17847. 

LEITZEL-ZIMMERMAN 

Susan Elizabeth Zimmerman x'65 
to Donald W. Leitzel Jr., August 2. 
1969, St. Matthews Church, Sun- 
bury, Pa. Mr. Leitzel is a field en- 
gineer for AMP. Inc. and Susan is a 
data processing clerk for the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania. The 
couple resides at 4117B Beechwood 
Lane, Harrisburg, Pa. 17112. 
VAN ANGLEN-WEBER 

Trixanna Weber '68 to Erik Paul 
Van Anglen '69, August 2, 1969, 
West Presbyterian Church, Wilming- 
ton, Del. At the wedding were Trudy 
Miller Miner '68, Karen Adams '68, 
Gary Miner '69, Robert Ray '69 and 
John Brill '69. Erik is an insurance 
investigator with the Retail Credit 
Co., Glenside, Pa. The couple lives 
at 503 Walnut St., Jenkintown, Pa. 
19046. 

RITCHIE-RENALDO 

Diane B. Renaldo '69 to James J. 
Ritchie, August 2, 1969, St. Michael's 
Catholic Church. Levittown. Pa. 
Claire Smith '69 served as maid of 
honor. Mr. Ritchie is a student at 
Temple University and is affiliated 
with the Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. 
Diane is a caseworker in geriatrics 
at Philadelphia State Hospital. Ad- 
dress: Apt. H-8, 1405 New Rodgers 
Rd., Bristol, Pa. 19007. 

YODER-RACHT 

Nancy Jeanne Racht '69 to James 
D. Yoder Jr. '69, August 9, 1969, Le- 
Raysville (Pa.) United Church of 
Christ. Taking part in the ceremony 
were Barbara Ballard '69, maid of 
honor; Sue Ebling '70, bridesmaid; 
David Teets '70, best man; Mania 
Spongier '69, vocalist; Joanne Reitz 
'69, organist; Daniel Scaff '72, aco- 
lyte; Daniel Keller 71, Randy Gehrel 
'69, Timothy Byrnes '71, David Hum- 
mel '69, Barry Boxer '70, brass en- 
semble; Greg Dye '72, reception 
pianist. Jim teaches junior high in- 
strumental music in the Mechanics- 
burg School District. Address: 111 
Spruce St., Shiremanstown, Pa. 
17091. 

KLOTZ-DUNKLE 

Sandra Lin Dunkle '63 to Karl 
Herbert Klotz, August 13. 1969, Im- 
manuel United Church of Christ, 
Williamsport. Pa. Sandra taught 
mathematics and English at Stevens 
Jr. H.S., Williamsport, Pa. 

BERLANDA-APPLETON 

Cherry Anne Appleton '67 to 



Mario L. Berlanda. August 16, 1969, 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Chestnut 
Hill, Pa. Jeanette Moyer '67 served 
as maid of honor. Karen Smith Fry 
'66 and Edris Kruger '67 were brides- 
maids. Ronald Williams '67 was an 
usher and Robert Miller '67, was the 
soloist. Mr. Berlanda. a graduate of 
Juniata College, is a science teacher 
and football coach at Hatboro-Hor- 
sham Jr. H.S. Cherry teaches 9th 
grade history at Upper Dublin School 
District and coaches junior high 
hockey and senior high lacrosse. The 
couple lives at Sussex Square Apts. 
K-l, Plymouth Meeting. Pa. 19462. 
HALL-PARKER 

Sandra Lea Parker to Dennis K. 
Hall '70. August 16, 1969, East Point 
United Methodist Church, Liberty. 
Pa. Dennis is completing his senior 
year at Susquehanna and his wife is 
completing hers at Mansfield State. 
LAWRENCE-HEIMBACH 

Anne Marie Heimbach '69 to 
Leonard George Lawrence, August 
16, 1969, St. Paul's United Church 
of Christ. Selinsrrove. Anne is the 
daughter of Norman L. and Anna 
Reeder Heimbach '40. She is teach- 
ing elementary music in the Lewis- 
burg (Pa.) School District. Mr. Law- 
rence, a graduate of Bloomsburg 
State College, is a fourth grade teach- 
er in the Selinsgrove Schools. The 
couple resides at 109 Snyder St., 
Shamokin Dam, Pa. 17876. 
MICHENER-MILLER 

Carol Ann Miller to Raymond Wil- 
liam Michener '69, August 16, 1969. 
Ray is doing graduate work in the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Gettysburg. 

HAVAS-FEITLER 

Louise Feitler to John Havas '68, 
August 23, 1969. John is studying at 
Dickinson School of Law and his 
wife is a graduate of West Virginia 
University. The couple resides at 119 
W. Louther St., Carlisle. Pa. 17013. 
LYNN-SHAFFER 

Linda L. Shaffer to David E. Lynn 
'65, August 23, 1969, St. Paul's 
United Methodist Church. Lewisburg. 
The Rev. Gary Owens '65 served as 
a groomsman. Dave completed his 
tour of duty with the U.S. Army and 
returned to work at the Rochester 
Telephone Co. Mrs. Lynn is a grad- 
uate of the Williamsport Hospital 
School of Nursing. 

PAPOVICH-PETERSON 

Glennette Rae Peterson '69 to 
Joseph S. Papovich '69, August 23, 



1969, Avondale Presbyterian Church, 
Avondale. Pa. Judy Hoffman '70, 
Virginia Wealherby '69, and Janice 
Brown Fisher '69 served as brides- 
maids. Gary Gilbert '69 was best 
man. Glennette is substitute teaching 
and Joe is working for Tyco Indus- 
tries until his entrance into the U.S. 
Air Force in January. Address: 216 
Broadway. Westville, N.J. 08093. 

TURNS-McALLISTER 
Elizabeth Lynne McAllister x'68 to 
Jeffrey K. Turns '69, August 23. 1969. 
Bryn Mawr. Pa. S.U. members of the 
wedding party were Susan Wershing 
'68, Marybeth Russell '68. Dean Ross 
'69. Daniel Corveleyn '69, Edward 
Schmidt '69, and Lance Andrews '69. 
Jeff is a salesman for the Ohio State 
Life Insurance Co. Lynne received 
her B.S. from Shippensburg State 
College and is an English teacher at 
Lower Paxton Jr. H.S. Address of 
the couple is 4100 Cypress Rd. K-l, 
Harrisburg, Pa. 17110. 

WOLF-HOFFMAN 
Eileen Hoffman to Michael James 
Wolf '69, August 23. 1969, Buffalo 
Valley Church of the Brethren, Miff- 
linburg. Pa. Michael is an auditor 
with the Naval Area Audit Service, 
Washington, D.C. and Mrs. Wolf is 
a graduate of the Williamsport Hos- 
pital School of Nursing. Address: 
Apt. 10. 1611 S. 28th St., Arlington, 
Va. 22206. 

LEPLEY-NESS 
Cynthia L. Ness '69 to Douglas L. 
Lepley '69, August 24, 1969, St. 
Paul's Lutheran Church, York, Pa. 
David Hummel '69 was an usher. 
Douglas teaches English at West 
Snyder H.S.. Beaver Springs, Pa. and 
is doing graduate work at Penn State. 
Cynthia is teacher of science and 
health at Chief Logan H.S., Lewis- 
town. Address: Box 34, Beaver 
Springs, Pa. 17812. 

STAUFFER-KAUFFMAN 
Eileen L. Kauffman to Samuel A. 
Stauffer '66, August 30, 1969, Em- 
manuel Lutheran Church, Middle- 
burg, Pa. Sam is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Walter Stauffer '30. Kenneth 
Orris '53 served as soloist. Timothy 
Stauffer '69, Sam's brother, was best 
man and Francis Nace '62 was an 
usher. Sam, returned from U.S. Army 
duty in Vietnam, teaches and coaches 
in the Middleburg Joint School Dis- 
trict. His wife is a Sunbury beauti- 
cian. The couple resides at 155 W. 
Main St., Middleburg, Pa. 17842. 



FALL 1969 



35 



KING-DRICK 

Sharon Kay Drick to Donald 
Steele King '66, August 1969. Don 
is the son of Joseph M. and Ruth 
Steele King '29. Robert King '68 was 
in the wedding party. Don teaches 
history at Jersey Shore (Pa.) H.S. 
CLARK-CONNOR 

Helen Williams Connor to Philip 
M. Clark '62, August 1969, Grace 
Lutheran Church, State College, Pa. 
The Rev. Robert R. Clark '35, father 
of the groom, and the Rev. Dale 
Bringman '48. pastor of Grace 
Church, officiated. Phil is on the 
staff of Rutgers University, where 
the bride is a graduate student in 
sociology. Address: 86 Livingston 
Ave., New Brunswick, N.J. 08903. 
LEAMAN-SLESSLER 

Diane Rae Slessler to Robert Brian 
Leaman '69. September 1969, St. 
Peter's United Methodist Church. 
Riverside, Pa. Lance Maltinson '69 
was best man, Jeffrey Turns '69 and 
Daniel Corveleyn '69 were ushers. 
Bob is attending the University of 
San Diego (Calif.) Law School. Mrs. 
Leaman is a graduate of the Geis- 
inger Medical Center School of 
Nursing. 

CROMWELL-PIERCE 

Marilyn J. Pierce '68 to Richard 
John Cromwell '68, September 6. 
1969. Richard has been assigned to 
the U.S. Naval Amphibious Base. 
Little Creek, Va. and is doing grad- 
uate work at Old Dominion College. 
Marilyn was a staff accountant with 
Price Waterhouse & Co. Address of 
the couple is 1713 Harmon St.. Apt. 
101, Norfolk, Va. 23518. 
BARR-CARY 

Nancy J. Cary '69 to Sp/4 Ronald 
A. Barr. September 14. 1969. Mr. 
Barr is with the U.S. Army. The 
couple resides at Apt. 324, 306 Canon 
Ave.. Manitou Springs, Colo. 80829. 
COULSTON-VULTEE 

Karen D. Vullee '67 to John F. 
Coulston, September 15, 1969. The 
couple is residing at 3101 Sora Ave., 
Louisville, Ky. 40213. 

Born Crusaders 

To John and Joanne Davis Zamos 
'65, a daughter. Joellen "Joey," July 
1968. Besides being mother and 
homemaker, Joanne is a tutor for the 
Newton Public School System. 12 
Condit St., Newton, N.J. 07860. 

To the Rev. and Mrs. James W. 



Morris '52, a daughter, through adop- 
tion June 19, 1969, born September 
15, 1968. Pastor Morris serves Grove 
Methodist Church, West Chester, Pa. 
1296 Country Lane, West Chester, 
Pa. 19380. 

To Robert K. '65 and Jennifer 
Haw-ley Hamme x'67, a daughter, 
Cynthia Noel, December 21, 1968. 
Bob is a senior accountant with 
Ernst & Ernst. 370 Hill-n-Dale Dr.. 
York, Pa. 17403. 

To Lee R. '61 and Caroline 
Shryock Conrad '60, their second 
daughter. Amy Louise, January 17. 
1969. Lee is a product specialist with 
DuPont. 713 Evans Rd., Springfield. 
Pa. 19064. 

To Peter A. '65 and Joan Duke 
Freimanis '66, a daughter, Dena 
Petra, January 24, 1969. Pete is 
teaching German at Vineland (N.J.) 
H.S. and coaching the cross country 
team, which was undefeated in 1968 
and this year won the Cumberland 
County championship. One of his 
harriers, Craig Urie '73, is now run- 
ning cross country for S.U. 

To Andrew B. and Janice Putz 
Baskind x'67 a daughter. Jennifer 
Lynette. February 18. 1969. Mr. 
Baskind is a sales representative for 
Tyndale. Inc., New York City. B-5, 
420 River Rd„ Chatham, N.J. 07928. 

To Ronald Gene and Janet Swen- 
son Updegrove '57, their third son. 
Derek Swenson, March 7, 1969. 
Woodside Drive, R.D. #2, Boyer- 
town. Pa. 19512. 

To Robert E. Jr. and Marjorie 
Rayner Waer '64. a daughter, Caro- 
lyn Susan, March 11, 1969. The 
couple's first child, a son, Brian Scott, 
was born November 12. 1965. 524 
W. Graisbury Ave., Audubon, N.J. 
08106. 

To Alan F. '66 and Deanna Savior 
Straubel '66, a daughter, Kathryn 
Emily, through adoption June 5, 
1969, born April 2. 1969. Al is a 
salesman for York Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. 

To the Rev. Edward C. and Patri- 
cia Taylor Schmidt '64, a son. Marc 
Andrew, through adoption. born 
April 10. 1969. Star Route, Vernon, 
N.J. 07462. 

To James C. '63 and Carol Gresh 
Black '63. a son, Gregory James, May 
2, 1969. In October of this year Jim 
joined the Tri-County National Bank. 
Middleburg, Pa., as operations of- 
ficer. Susquehanna Rd., R.D. #1, 
Northumberland. Pa. 17857. 



To Peter M. and J. Maris Stichler 
Goda '65, a son Peter Michael Jr., 
May 11, 1969. Mr. Goda is vocation- 
al counselor for the Bureau of Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation. R.D. #1, Box 
170, Mohrsville, Pa. 19541. 

To Charles V. and Alberta Spoerer 
Dean '67, a daughter, Tracy Lynn, 
May 14, 1969. 3504 Winnland Dr., 
Louisville, Ky. 40219. 

To Russell D. and Doris Schu- 
macher LaForce '59. their fourth 
child, a son, Randall Douglas, May 
14, 1969. Mr. LaForce is band di- 
rector at Springfield Township H.S., 
Oreland. Pa. 112 Ranier Rd.. Ply- 
mouth Meeting, Pa. 19462. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Jay S. Berman 
'63, their third child, a son, Thomas 
Bradley, May 19, 1969. 1046 Elm- 
wood Dr.. Pottstown, Pa. 19464. 

Dr. William M. and Mary Ann 
Valunas Weader x'62, their third 
child, a son, William Michael III, 
May 28, 1969. 107 Susquehanna 
Ave., Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Joe W. Klein- 
bauer '6'3, their second daughter, 
Martha Louise, June 10, 1969. 532 
N. 8th St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Stanley R. Shill- 
ing '57, a daughter. Sheri Renec. 
June 16. 1969. Sheri has three 
brothers. Stan is purchasing agent for 
Wagner College. 44 Monmouth Ave., 
Freehold, N.J. 07728. 

To Capt. Joseph and Susan Nainey 
Caruso '66, a son, Craig Andrew, 
June 16. 1969. Sister Julie Ann was 
born June 9, 1967. Susan and the 
children are living at 1051 Moncrief 
Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43207, while 
father is serving with the U.S. Air 
Force in Vietnam. 

To John A. and Mary Drake Fran- 
co x'67, a son, John Jr., June 21, 
1969. Mr. Franco was with the 101st 
Airborne Division in Hue. Vietnam 
and arrived home the day before the 
baby was born. He is a New York 
State attorney, c/o Drake, Pension 
Hollow Rd.. R.D. #1, Elverson, Pa. 
19520. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ronald E. 
Oehlert '65, their second son, Jeffrey 
Scott, July 4, 1969. 129 N. 4th Ave., 
Royersford, Pa. 19468. 

To Ronald T. and Anne Ostheim 
Barnes '62. their second child, a 
daughter. Lori Anne. July 5. 1969. 
1805 S. Dora. Ukiah. Calif. 95482. 

To Robert C. '65 and Mary Schal- 
les Cairns '66, their second daughter, 
Nancy Elisabeth. July 7, 1969. Bob 



36 



SUSQUEHANNA AtUMNUS 



is office manager and general account- 
ant for Trailco Manufacturing and 
Sales Co., Hummels Wharf Plant. 
P.O. Box 34, Freeburg. Pa. 17827. 

To Joseph and Karen Bond Scala 
'64, their first child, a daughter, Lynn 
Marie. July 8, 1969. Cedar Lane 
Apts. D-8. Ossining. N.Y. 10562. 

To Gary G. '65 and Joan Hoffman 
Zerbe '67, a son. David Alan, July 9, 
1969. Gary is Main Rehabilitation 
Counselor at Abilene State School 
and Hospital. 201 N. LaSalle Dr., 
Abilene. Tex. 79604. 

To John '60 and Ann Hewes 
Yanuklis '61. a daughter, Amanda 
Jane, July 29, 1969. 37 Highridge 
Rd., Monroe, N.Y. 10950. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. 
Gerard, a son, Nathan Paul, through 
adoption. September 24, 1969. born 
August 2, 1969. Mr. Gerard has been 
director of admissions at Susquehan- 
na for the past three years. R.D. #1, 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Jack K. Bishop 
'57, their second son. Brian Douglas, 
July 29, 1969. Jack is personnel staff 
assistant for Hershey Foods, Hershey, 
Pa. 3822 Carriage House Dr., Camp 
Hill, Pa. 17011. 

To Henry J. '70 and Barbara Hitch- 
ens DePerro '69, a daughter, Barbara 
Ann, July 30, 1969. Hank plays var- 
sity football at S.U. and is completing 
his senior year. 21 N. Market St., 
Selinsgrove. Pa. 17870. 

To Stephen M. '68 and Sharon 
Fetterolf Vak '68, a son, Stephen 
Michael III, August 9, 1969. Steve is 
teaching mathematics and is assist- 
ant wrestling coach. North Schuylkill 
H.S. Skyline Apts., Apt. 102, Cres- 
sona, Pa. 17929. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Neil Potter, their 
third child, Abby Lynn, August 9, 
1969. Dr. Potter is assistant professor 
of chemistry at S.U. 12 Charles Ave., 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870. 

To Frank Jr. and Lynn Pftster 
Knight '64, a son, Richard Todd. 
August 14, 1969. Lynn is presently 
on maternity leave from Locust Val- 
ley Intermediate School and plans to 
complete her master's degree next 
spring. 28 Joyce Rd., Plainview, N.Y. 
11803. 

To Mr. and Mrs. R. Peter Johnson 
'66, a son, Michael Choudhary. Aug- 
ust 18, 1969. American Peace Corps, 
Kalambagh Rd., P.O. and District: 
Muza Lfarpur, Bihar, India. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James M. Hand- 
Ian, their second child, a son, James 



Byron. August 19. 1969. Mr. Hand- 
Ian is an instructor in mathematics 
at Susquehanna. R.D. #2, Selins- 
grove. Pa. 17870. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Glanzberg 
'48, their second daughter, Regina 
Jill. August 23, 1969. Father is vice 
president of Lehrman and Glanzberg, 
Inc., Hempstead (N.Y.) advertising 
and design firm. 16 Elfland Court, 
Cove Neck. Oyster Bay, N.Y. 11771. 

To Louis R. '61 and Margaret 
Webb Coons '61, their second son, 
Brian Andrew. August 29. 1969. 
10300 Darby St., Fairfax, Va. 22030. 

To Barry R. '68 and Denise Hor- 
ton Jackson '68, a daughter, Adrienne 
Nicole, September 6, 1969. Barry is 
serving with the U.S. Army. 264 Val- 
ley View Rd., Springfield. Pa. 19064. 

To Earl and Judith Lloyd Famous 
'67, a son Mark Andrew, September 
1969. R.D. #2, Street. Md. 21154. 

To the Rev. and Mrs. Alfred A. 
Ambrose '64, a son. Bradley Scott. 
October 7. 1969. Apt. B, 340 Up- 
per Market St., Milton. Pa. 17847. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George H. Pospi- 
sil '57. their fourth daughter, Jen- 
nifer Wynn, October 21, 1969. 4 
Omaha Dr., Cranford, N.J. 07016. 



deaths 



Isabelle Wagner Bittner '32, Salis- 
bury, Pa., 1958. 

William S. McLucas x'69, Kenil- 
worth. 111.. 1966. 

Foster Heckler x'42, Hollywood, 
Fla., May 27. 1967. 

Stewart William Carson x'30, Weir- 
ton, W. Va., June 30, 1968. He was 
president of Tri-State Rubber Sales 
Inc. and a member of Resurrection 
Lutheran Church and various Ma- 
sonic lodges. Among his survivors is 
his wife, the former Leah McLain 
x'30. 

Edmund K. Ritter '22. South Wil- 
liamsport. Pa., 1969. 

Peter J. Sincavage '28, Sugar 
Notch. Pa., 1969. 

Dr. James R. Cameron hc'58, Phil- 
adelphia, February 22, 1969. He was 
professor of oral surgery in the Tem- 
ple University School of Medicine 
and practiced in partnership with Dr. 
Everett P. Borghesani. He was grant- 
ed Susquehanna's LL.D. degree. 

Nancy Hamlin Miller '31, Falls, 
Pa., March 24, 1969. A former 



school teacher in Pittston. Pa., she 
was a partner in her husband's busi- 
ness before retiring in 1958. In addi- 
tion to her husband, she is survived 
by a sister, Sara R. Hamlin '29. 

Martha Teats Helwig x'24, Selins- 
grove, Pa.. April 10, 1969. A widow, 
she taught in the Chapman Township 
Schools and was later employed at 
the Selinsgrove State School and Hos- 
pital, retiring in 1966. She was a 
member of the First Lutheran Church 
and the Ladies Auxiliary of the 
Dauntless Hook and Ladder Co. The 
Rev. Celo V. Leitzel '45 officiated at 
the funeral services. 

Mary Ella Gougler Smith '26, 
Middleburg, Pa., April 14, 1969. She 
taught in the secondary schools in 
Millheim and Middleburg. Pa.; Pem- 
berton, N.J.; and in Hawaii. Mrs. 
Smith traveled extensively with her 
husband during his army career, was 
a lifelong member of Emmanuel 
Lutheran Church, Middleburg. and 
served as president of the Middle- 
burg Women's Club. 

Arthur G. Jarrett, Selinsgrove, Pa., 
May 23. 1969. A telegrapher with 
the Pennsylvania Railroad for 48 
years, he was a member of Trinity 
Lutheran Church, the Order of Rail- 
road Telegraphers, Northern Region 
PRR Veterans Association, I.O.O.F. 
Lodge #197, and the Dauntless Hook 
and Ladder Co. Among his survivors 
are daughter Kathryn Jarrett Rhoads 
x'34 and son-in-law Simon B. Rhoads 
'30. The Rev. Celo V. Leitzel '45 of- 
ficiated at the services. 

Paul L. Hauke '26. Romulus, N.Y., 
May 28, 1969. He was a retired en- 
gineer and Finger Lakes Outdoors 
columnist for The Geneva Times. 
Holder of both bachelor's and mas- 
ter's degrees from Susquehanna, he 
was one of the original promoters of 
the Finger Lakes Sports-O-Rama and 
the Trout Derby, and was the first 
president of the incorporated organ- 
ization, which plans to sponsor a 
Paul Hauke Memorial Trophy as an 
annual Trout Derby award. Mr. 
Hauke was a member of First Pres- 
byterian Church, Finger Lakes CB 
Club, Geneva Kiwanis, Seneca Lake 
Waterways Association, Geneva Con- 
servation Club, and Round Hill 
Lodge 533, F&AM of Endicott. 

The Rev. Walter J. Drumm '39, 
Berwick, Pa., May 31, 1969. He re- 
ceived the B.D. degree from the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at 
Philadelphia and served St. John's, 



FALL 1969 



37 



Auburn. N.Y. and St. Paul's, Nu- 
midia, Pa. before begining a 13-year 
pastorate at Grace Lutheran Church, 
Mt. Carmel in 1954. He became pas- 
tor of Grace Church, Berwick in 
1967 and served as dean of the 
Bloomsburg District, Central Penn- 
sylvania Synod of the LCA. 

Linda Gail Brenner '69, Manas- 
quan, N.J., June 1, 1969, from in- 
juries received in an automobile acci- 
dent. She was a University Scholar, 
a member of several honor societies 
and Alpha Delta Pi sorority, and ac- 
tive in athletics and other activities. 
Her degree was conferred posthu- 
mously. 

Henry R. Carichner '29. Easton. 
Pa.. June 1969. He earned the M.Ed, 
degree at Penn State University, 
taught mathematics and biology in 
high schools of Wyoming and West 
Pittston, Pa., and began a long and 
distinguished career with the YMCA 
in 1937. He served in various execu- 
tive secretaryships in Pittston and 
Boyertown. Pa.; Providence, R.I.; 
Easton, Pa.; and as a district execu- 
tive. During World War II, he direct- 
ed USO clubs for the Army and 
Navy Department. 

Adah G angler Jacques '09. New 
London, Conn., June 7. 1969. She 
was a teacher at the Selinsgrove State 
School and Hospital prior to mov- 
ing to New London; was a member 
of Trinity Lutheran Church of Selins- 
grove, Eastern Star, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, and the Sus- 
quehanna Women's Auxiliary. Among 
her survivors is daughter Jacqueline 
Jacques Driscoll x'47. 

Elizabeth E. Taylor '10, Altoona, 
Pa., June 20, 1969. Miss Taylor re- 
tired from teaching school in 1953. 
She was a member of the First Lu- 
theran Church. Matins Circle and the 
Altoona Hospital Auxiliary. Surviv- 
ing are brother Elwyn '08 and sister 
Romaine x'08. 

Helen E. O'Connell '31. Plymouth, 
Pa., July 26, 1969. She was a teach- 
er at the G.A.R. Memorial H.S.. 
Wilkes-Barre. Pa. 

Bertha Meiser Bolig '04, North- 
umberland, Pa., July 31, 1969. She 
studied in New York, taught piano 
at Susquehanna for a year after grad- 
uation, and was active in music cir- 
cles, and work at St. John's Lutheran 
Church, Northumberland. She was a 
charter member of Priestley Chapter 
of Eastern Star and a member of 
Fort Augusta Chapter, D.A.R. 



38 



Solomon Luther Reed '08, Still- 
water, Okla., August 3, 1969. He held 
BA. and M.A. degrees from S.U.; 
M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale. 
Dr. Reed served as principal and su- 
perintendent at Middlesex Schools 
in New York and taught at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. Gustavus 
Adolphus College, and Oklahoma 
State University where he spent 35 
years and was head of the Psychology 
Department. He wrote a number of 
articles on testing and attitudes; was 
a member of Pi Gamma Mu, Phi 
Kappa Phi, and other honor societies; 
and president of the Oklahoma State 
Psychology Association. Among his 
survivors are nephew Merle Hoover 
'41 and his wife, the former Mary 
Lee Krumbholz '42, and niece Del- 
phine Hoover Reitz '42. 

Edward D. Madden Jr. '49, Mil- 
waukee. Wis., August 7, 1969. A 
veteran of Infantry service in World 
War II, he was on the national ad- 
vertising staff of The Milwaukee 
Journal and a member of the Na- 
tional Press Sales Executives and the 
Premium Advertisers Association. 
For the past ten years he was an ac- 
count executive, first for John Plain 
Incentives and then for John Oster 
Manufacturing Co., Milwaukee. 

Benjamin E. Trautman. Sunbury. 
Pa., August 9, 1969. A real estate 
and insurance man, he served sev- 
eral times as a lecturer in real estate 
and appraisal subjects and for spe- 
cial programs at Susquehanna Uni- 
versity as well as Penn State and Ly- 
coming College. 

Ralph B. Lohr '31. Hollsopple. Pa.. 
August 13. 1969. He was a school 
teacher and later a partner and store 
manager of Lohr Hardware and Feed. 

Oscar Byerly '19, Dalmatia, Pa.. 
August 21. 1969. A retired merchant 
and veteran of World War I. he was 
a member of the Trinity Lutheran 
Church. Dalmatia; Chamber of Com- 
merce of the Susquehanna Valley; 
and a number of area service and 
social organizations. 

Donald C. Lehmer '60. Cumber- 
land, Md.. September 22, 1969. He 
was operations manager for W. T. 
Grant Co.. Cumberland. Don was a 
member of Lambda Chi Alpha fra- 
ternity; Pine Street Presbyterian 
Church. Harrisburg; Blairsville (Pa.) 
Jaycees and past president of the 
Blairsville Merchants' Association. 
Survivors include his wife, the form- 
er Jane Sanders x'60; two daugh- 



ters, and sister Dorothy Lehmer 
Ronemus x'58. 

Paul B. Faust '18, Harrisburg, Pa., 
fall 1969. He received the master of 
arts degree from S.U. and taught in 
public schools in Pennsylvania for 45 
years. He also taught in the Harris- 
burg Area Community College and 
was secretary of Pennsylvania State 
Retired Teachers Association. He was 
a member of the Derry Street United 
Methodist Church, Harrisburg Con- 
sistory, and the Civil Service Com- 
mission, City of Harrisburg. 

George M. Mark '03, Selinsgrove, 
Pa.. October 1, 1969. He had been 
a guest at the Masonic Homes, Eliza- 
bethtown. Pa., for the past two years. 
Mr. Mark taught school in Union and 
Mifflin Counties and also was a radio 
operator for the Pennsylvania De- 
partment of Highways. He held mem- 
bership in Trinity Lutheran Church, 
Selinsgrove, and Lafayette Lodge 
#194, F&AM. 

Alice P. Rearick '23. Mifflintown, 
Pa., October 20, 1969. She was a re- 
tired school teacher who served a 
long tenure in Juniata Area Joint 
H.S., Mifflintown. Miss Rearick was 
a member of Messiah Lutheran 
Church, PSEA, and various social 
and educational organizations in the 
Mifflintown area. Among her sur- 
vivors is sister Susan Rearick Shan- 
non '20. 

Sanford P. Blough '42, Berwyn, 
Pa.. October 5, 1969. He served as 
a lieutenant in the U.S. Army in the 
European Theatre, 1942-46. Joining 
the accounting staff of Bell Telephone 
Company's eastern Pennsylvania area, 
he later became disbursement ac- 
counting manager and then general 
accounting supervisor. After a period 
as data systems administrator for the 
American Telephone & Telegraph 
Co. in New York, he was promoted 
to vice president and comptroller of 
the Bell Telephone Co. of Pennsyl- 
vania and the Diamond State Tele- 
phone Co. two years ago. Survivors 
who attended Susquehanna include 
brother H. Vernon Blough '3 1 and 
cousins Nancy Blough Dales '2 1 and 
Dr. Roger M. Blough '25. 

June Smith Zimmerman. Beaver- 
town, Pa.. September 5. 1969. A 
former secretary in Susquehanna's 
Public Information Office, she was a 
member of the Paxtonville United 
Methodist Church. Her husband, 
Robert S., is sergeant of the Univer- 
sity's security guard. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



Susquehanna University Alumni Association 

Directory of Officers 1969-70 



word S. Rogers Jr. '42, 1629 S. Crescent Blvd., Yordley, Pa. 19067 President 

Erie I. Shobert II '35, St. Marys, Pa. 15857 Vice President 

rry W. Butts Jr. '48, 23315 Old Orchard Trail, Birmingham, Mich. 28010 

Vice-President 
rothy Turner '36. Rear 68 Division St., Kingston, Pa. 18704 Recording Secretary 

■ster G. Rowe '52, 306 W. Pine St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 Treasurer 

John J. Houtz '08, 405 University Ave., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 Historian 

ise Mehring Koontz, '35 (Mrs. Howard E. Jr.), Wyndwood Hill 

Route 7, Box 24-C, Westminster, Md. 21157 

Representative on the University Board of Directors 

wrence M. Isaacs '43, 27 Thornewood Rd., Windmill Farm, Armonk, N.Y. 10504 

Representative on the University Board of Directors 

non B. Rhoads '30, Susquehanna Ave., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 

Representative to Athletic Committee 
Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1970 
nothy E. Barnes '35, 251 N. Park St., Mt. Carmel, Pa. 17851 

rothy Eilhardt Gundrum '48 (Mrs. Eugene H.), 1182 Sarah St., Bethel Park, Pa. 

15102 
e Rev. Dale S. Bringman '48, 220 Homan Ave., State College, Pa. 16801 

James C. Gehris '50, 633 W. Chestnut St., Shamokin, Pa. 17872 
incy Davis Raab '61 (Mrs. John H.), 386 Forest Ave., Glen Ridge, N.J. 07028 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1971 
, Bryce E. Nicodemus '31, 471 S. Main St., Lewistown, Pa. 17044 
■orge H. Bantley '41, 4998 Longview Dr., Murrysville, Pa. 15668 
irley A. Young '51, 6136 Wayne Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 
lliam C. Davenport '53, 420 Deerfield Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 
orge C. Liddington '54, 78 Center Ave., Chatham. N.J. 07928 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expiring 1972 

Alfred Streamer '26, 422 Kemmerer Rd., State College, Pa. 16801 
bert A. Gabrenya '40, 535 Ash St., Johnstown, Pa. 15902 
irsh C. Bogar '51, 4200 Ridgeview Rd., Harrisburg, Pa. 17112 

Reuben Henry '54, 3 Stanyon Rd., York, Pa. 17403 
illiam H. Kohl '62, 532 S. Market St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 



strict Club Organizations 



ALTOONA 

e., Altoona, 



'. Elwyn Taylor '08, 3600 Beale Ave., Altoona, Pa. 16601 President 

ddison E. Pohle '27, 1108-22nd Ave., Altoona, Pa. 16601 Vice President 

;ttie Winey Moorhead '54 (Mrs. Gerald E.), R.D. #1, Martinsburg, Pa. 16662 

Secretary-Treasurer 

BALTIMORE 

j be elected 

CALIFORNIA 

r. Robert N. Troutman '26, 434 W. 12th St., Claremont, Calif. 91711 President 

CENTRE-UNION 
he Rev. Kenneth R. Anderson '35, Centre Hall, Pa. 16828 President 

oul R. Bingaman '49, 1000 Greenwood Circle, State College, Pa. 16801 

Vice-President 
*ory Moyer Bringman '45 (Mrs. Dale S), 220 Homan Ave., State College, Pa. 

16801 Secretary-Treasurer 

CHAMBERSBURG-HAGERSTOWN 

ynn E. Lerew '63, 324 Carlton Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 President 

oul Lucas '38, 1855 Scotland Ave., Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 Vice President 

tocella Chaya Turnboch '36 (Mrs. Edward), 401 W. King St., Shippensburg, Pa. 

17257 Secretary-Treasurer 

HARRISBURG 

'ichard J. Tietbohl '60, 10 Richland Lane, Apt. 103, American Apts., Camp Hill, Pa. 

17011 President 

"illiam C. Davenport '53, 420 Deerfield Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 Vice President 

'oyce Sheesley Shirey '62, (Mrs. Samuel R.), 1290 Oyster Mill Rd., Camp Hill, Pa. 

17011 Secretary 

Serine Byrod Whitman '44 (Mrs. Clayton K.), 571 Walnut Rd., Steelton, Pa. 

17092 Treasurer 

JOHNSTOWN 

ercy B. Davis x'26, 1088 Tener St., Johnstown, Pa. 15904 President 

1 Vernon Blough '31, 841 Vickroy Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 Vice President 

*"'y Lizzio Govekar '47, (Mrs. Max A.), P.O. Box 14, Elton, Pa. 15934 Secretary 

'homos J. Weible '23, 324 Orchard St., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 Treasurer 

l«fri Williamson Kelly '36 (Mrs. Robert L.), 109 N. Walnut St., Davidsville, Pa. 

15928 
*ory Barnes Topper '37 (Mrs. John A.), Hyndman, Pa. 15545 
■lorry P. Shaffer '29, 526 Vickroy Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15905 

LEHIGH VALLEY 

>'■ Nevin C. T. Shaffer '49, 1632 Walnut St., Allentown, Pa. 18102 
'°nk G. Smith '55, 1838 N. 21st St., Allentown, Pa. 18104 
:°'inne Kahn Kramer '45 (Mrs. Harold R.), 1154 E. Cedar St 



Director 
Director 
Director 



President 
Vice President 
Allentown, Pa. 18103 
Secretary-Treasurer 



LEWISTOWN 

Shawnee Hills, Belleville, Pa 



>loysius V. Derr '48, Seneca Rd 

°n A. Linn '52, 601 Harvard St., Lewistown, Pa. 17044 

'"■yle Troxell Yingling '60, R.D. #3, Box 122A, Lewistown 



17004 President 

Vice President 
Pa. 17044 

Secretary-Treasurer 



MOUNT CARMEl-SHAMOKIN 
Timothy E. Barnes '35, 251 N. Park St., Mt. Carmel, Pa. 
Dr. James C. Gehris '50, 633 W. Chestnut St., Shamokin, 
S. John Price '42, 1435 Arch St., Ashland, Pa. 17921 



17851 President 

Pa. 17872 Vice President 

Secretary -Treasurer 



NEW YORK METROPOLITAN 

The Rev. Dr. John G. Gensel '40, 215 W. 98th St., Apt. 11-B, New York, N.Y. 10025 

Vice President 
Richard G. Westervelt '50, 700 Scarsdale Ave., Scarsdale, N.Y. 10583 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Jack Thorp '50, Thorp Lane, Norwalk, Conn. 06850 Executive Committee 

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA 

Alice Greeger Pfeffer '51 (Mrs. William M.), Trailwood R.D. #1, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

18702 President 
Xavier Abbott '35, 215 Oliver St., Swoyerville, Pa. 18704 Vice President 

Dorothy Turner '36, Rear 68 Division St., Kingston, Pa. 18704 Secretary-Treasurer 

NORTH NEW JERSEY 

George '54 and Lorraine Rarick Liddington '52, 78 Center Ave., Chatham, N.J. 07928 

President 
Robert C. '53 and Margaret Brady Wyllie x'54, 8 Thome Place, Fanwood, N.J. 07023 

Vice President 
John H. '62 and Nancy Davis Raab '61, 386 Forest Ave., Glen Ridge, N.J. 07028 

Secretary-Treasurer 
PHILADELPHIA 
Donald F. Wohlsen '50, Kenilworth lane. Ambler, Pa. 19002 President 

James B. Norton III '64, Box 7, Mt. Airy Rd., Coatesville, Pa. 19320 

1st Vice President 
Park H. Haussler '57, 740 Winchester Rd., Broomall, Pa. 19008 2nd Vice President 

Shirley A. Young '51, 6136 Wayne Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 

Recording Secretary 
Betty Reisch Jones '48 (Mrs. Cynddylan M.) 387 Woodcock Ave., Feasterville, Pa. 

19047 Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer 

Director 

Director 

19004 

Director 

PITTSBURGH 

Eugene H. Gundrum '48, 1182 Sarah St., Bethel Park, Pa. 15102 President 

Harry R. Johnston '49, 284 McClane Farm Rd., Washington, Pa. 15301 Vice President 

Dorothy Eilhardt Gundrum '48 (Mrs. Eugene H.), 1182 Sarah St., Bethel Park, Pa. 

15102 Secretary-Treasurer 

READING 
W. Frank Laudenslayer '39, R.D. #3, Boyertown, Pa. 19512 
Dr. Ralph H. Tietbohl Jr. '49, 3031 Van Reed Rd., Sinking Spring, Pa 



Robert E. Ricedorf '50, 705 S. Penn St., West Chester, Pa. 19380 
Louise E. West '39. Ill S. Church St., West Chester, Pa. 19380 
Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42, 1629 S. Crescent Blvd., Yardley, Pa. 19068 
Paul A. Wagner '50, 25 Old Lancaster Rd., Apt. A-7, Bala Cynwyd, Pa. 



William S. Whiteley '35, 1910 N. 15th St., Reading, Pa. 19604 
Richard Cahn '58, 412 Church Rd., Wernersville, Pa. 19565 



President 

19608 

Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



SOUTH JERSEY 

Leslie R. Butler '62, 51 S. Summit Ave., Pitman, N.J. 08071 
Peter M. Nunn '57, 32 Mercator Lane, Willingboro, N.J. 08046 
George S. Dodge '58, 114 Delaware St., Woodbury, N.J. 08096 
H. Larry Roberts '68, 40 Newton Ave., Woodbury, N.J. 08096 
Richard J. Biedermann '64, 39 Broad St., Woodstown, N.J. 08098 
David J. Schumacher '64, 3103 Sheffield Dr., Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077 
Judith Arnold Mclntyre '62 (Mrs. Ralph P.), 309 Victor Ave., Cherry Hill, N.J. 08034 

Director 
Douglas E. Sports '63, 1305 Columbia Ave., Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077 Director 

Kenneth F. Erdley Jr. '55, 219 Lakeside Dr., Glassboro, N.J. 08028 



President 

Vice President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Director 



Director 



SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY 

Roger A. Holtzapple '59, 228 N. 11th St., Lewisburg, Pa. 17837 President 

Harold E. Bollinger '39, 640 King St., Northumberland, Pa. 17857 Vice President 

Carl L. Campbell '65, 327 Orange St., Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870 Treasurer 

Joan Ortolani Billig '66 (Mrs. Joseph S. Jr.), 36 Upper Market St., Milton, Pa. 17847 

Secretary 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 
Freida Dreese Dunkle '29 (Mrs. Lloyd L. Jr.), 4538 N. 39th St., Arlington, Va. 22207 

President 
Karl H. F. Schoffrath '64, 6666 Hillandale Rd., Apt. 21, Chevy Chose, Md. 20015 

Vice President 
Dr. Glenn L. Musser '41, 457 Argyle Dr., Alexandria, Va. 22305 Vice President 

Lois Renfer '52, 7511 Springlake Dr. C2, Bethesda, Md. 20034 Secretary-Treasurer 

WIlllAMSPORT 

Winifred Myers O'Dell '49 (Mrs. George), 190 N. Railroad St., 



Jill A. Fuller '58, 503 Allegheny St., Jersey Shore, Pa. 17740 

YORK-HANOVER 
Willis B. Van Dyke '49, 3325 Edenbridge Rd., York, Pa 



Hughesville, Pa. 
17737 President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



17402 



President 
Mary Lehman Van Dyke '49, 3325 Edenbridge Rd., York, Pa. 17402 Vice President 

Dorothy Nitchman Bowen '49 (Mrs. Lyle H.), 720 Gunnison Rd., York, Pa. 17404 



E. Jane Stilt '44, 2000 Worth St., York, Pa. 17404 



Secretary 
Treasurer 






FALL 1969 



39 




Dates to remember in 1970 . . . 

JANUARY 24 ALUMNI WORKSHOP, all committees 

MAY 1 - 3 ALUMNI WEEKEND, class reunions and 5 

JUNE 7 BACCALAUREATE and COMMENCEMENT 

OCTOBER 17 HOMECOMING 




The Susquehanna Rlumnus 

SUSQUEHANNA UNIVERSITY 

SELINSGROVE, PENNSYLVANIA 

17870 




POSTMASTER: Please notify if undelivered. En- 
tered at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 17870 Post 
Office as Second Class matter. 




I Susquehanna Alumnus 




m~£ 



nuwnm ouuwdnbm 




Seibert Hall from the King Gate 



Oh, every year hath its winter, 

And every year hath its rain — 

But a day is always coming 

When the birds go north again. 

ELLA HIGGINSON (1862-1940) 



The Susquehanna Alumnus 



Susquehanna's own, Roger M. Blough 
'25, appears on the cover while address- 
ing the November 21 Business-Industry 
Symposium on campus. A high-level 
forum with far-reaching potentialities 
for the University, it was organized by 
Homer W. Wieder Jr., assistant to the 
president for development, and Lawrence 
M. Isaacs '43, chairman of the Board 
of Directors' Development Committee. 
The event is covered in detail beginning 
on the following page. 

Attorney Blough is no doubt Susque- 
hanna's best-known alumnus. For his 
contributions to the business world and 
various other aspects of American life, 
he has been honored many times. He 
holds at least 15 honorary degrees — the 
first of which was conferred by his Alma 
Mater in 1953. He also has received SU's 
Alumni Achievement Award medal and 
such prominent recognitions as the 
Brotherhood Award of the National Con- 
ference of Christians and Jews, and the 
Gold Medal of the National Football 
Foundation and Hall of Fame. He is cur- 
rently first vice president of the Univer- 
sity's Board of Directors. 



Vol. 39 



WINTER 1970 



No. 2 



CONTENTS 



Business-Industry Symposium 



Trends in Admissions 



The '69ers Report 



Alumni Association Standing Committees 



'I Do" 



14 



17 



23 



24 



Born Crusaders 



25 



Susquehanna University 
Alumni Association 



Deaths 



26 



Edward S. Rogers Jr. '42, president; Harry W. 
Butts Jr. '48, Dr. Erie I. Shobert II '35, vice 
presidents; Dorothy Turner '36, recording secre- 
tory; Chester G. Rowe '52, treasurer; Dr. John 
J. Houtz '08, historian; Lawrence M. Isaacs '43, 
Louise Mehring Koontz '35, representatives on 
the University Board of Directors; Simon B. 
Rhoads '30, representative on the Athletic 
Committee. 

Executive Board members-at-large, term expir- 
ing 1970: Timothy E. Barnes '35, The Rev. 
Dale S. Bringman '48, Dr. James C. Gehris '50, 
Dorothy Eilhardt Gundrum '48, Nancy Davis 
Raab '61. Term expiring 1971: George E. Bant- 
ley '41, William C. Davenport '53, George C. 
Liddington '54, Dr. Bryce E. Nicodemus '31, 
Shirley A. Young '51. Term expiring 1972: Marsh 
C. Bogar '51 , Robert A. Gabrenya '40, W. 
Reuben Henry '54, William H. Kahl '62, W. 
Alfred Streamer '26. 



Editor 
GEORGE R. F. TAMKE 

Director of Alumni Relations 
CHARLES H. CARR '52 

Staff Writers 

RONALD E. BERKHEIMER 

MARGARET F. ERNST 



Entered as second-class matter September 26, 1931, at the Post Office 
at Selinsgrove, Pa. 17870, under the Act of August 24, 1912. Pub- 
lished four times a year by Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, Pa. 



WINTER 1970 



BUSINESS- 



Kenneth Fladmark, chairman of 

Susquehanna's Business Division, holder 

of degrees from Augustana College 

(S.D.), Pittsburgh and Penn State, 

author of numerous papers on marketing 

and marketing practices. 





Clifford Jones, 
Pennsylvania's secretary 
of labor and industry, 
product of Westminster 
College, former 
deputy secretary of 
commerce, now heads 
more than 30 
Commonwealth groups 
concerned with 
employment, manpower, 
wages, industrial 
safety, vocational 
rehabilitation, 
apprenticeship 
training, etc. 





David Horlacher, associate professor 
of economics, studied at Dartmouth 
and University of Pennsylvania, 
specialist in application of econometric 
models to measuring benefits of 
population control in India. 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



INDUSTRY SYMPOSIUM 



[ 



Throughout American history, business and in- 
dustry have been the subject of a vociferous debate. 
Defenders of the capitalistic or "free enterprise" 
system tell us that it has created the highest stand- 
ard of living the world has ever known. Critics point 
to the disparity between rich and poor, the destruc- 
tion of natural resources, and the great miscalcula- 
tions in domestic and foreign policy by a government 
allegedly dominated by commercial and industrial 
captains. 

The controversy is as old as the nation itself. 
Alexander Hamilton, reared in the West Indies 
where growers of sugar cane were always in debt to 
the middlemen who purchased their crops, knew 
that the United States would never be completely in- 
dependent if it were economically subservient to an- 
other country. In his Report on Manufactures, he 
called for the establishment of a tariff and other 
steps to promote business and industry, even suggest- 
ing that children might be employed to perform some 
of the lighter tasks in factories. 

Thomas Jefferson, who envisioned a nation of 
sturdy, landowning farmers, took a different view. 
He wrote: "Generally speaking the proportion which 
the aggregate of other classes of citizens bears in 
any State to that of its husbandman, is the propor- 
tion of its unsound to its healthy parts, and is a good 
enough barometer whereby to measure its degree of 
corruption. While we have land to labor then, let us 
never wish to see our citizens occupied at a work- 
bench, or twirling a distaff . . ." 

Receiving tremendous impetus from the demand 
for a variety of products during the Civil War, com- 
merce and industry enjoyed a period of unparalleled 
expansion and development during the latter half of 
the 19th century. But the same years were marred 
by stock watering scandals, the giving away of mil- 
lions of acres of public land and valuable rights-of- 
way to railroad and street car companies, labor riots, 
the formation of monopolistic trusts, and widespread 



corruption in Congress, state legislatures and city 
councils. 

Although most Americans took great pride in 
the accomplishments of industry and ignored the 
problems it had created, a growing number of ar- 
ticulate persons began to protest. Jane Addams, who 
established the social settlement, Hull House, told 
the wife of one of Chicago's leading industrialists 
that she was to blame for prostitution in the city be- 
cause she allowed her husband's firm to pay women 
wages of $6 a week. 

Shortly after the turn of the century Teddy 
Roosevelt applied the term "Muckrakers" to writ- 
ers like Upton Sinclair, who described the filthy con- 
ditions of the meat packing industry; John Spargo, 
author of "The Bitter Cry of the Children;" and Ida 
Tarbell, who exposed the Standard Oil Company's 
efforts to eliminate competition. 

This agitation and the resultant shift in public 
opinion led to the passage of the Pure Food and 
Drug Act, child labor laws, railroad regulation and 
a variety of other legislation during the "Progressive 
Era" before World War I. The doctrine of laissez 
faire was discredited and additional legislation passed 
during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt 
in the 1930s ushered in the new age of "regulated 
capitalism." 

But the debate continues. College students and 
"liberals" still voice fears about the "military-indus- 
trial complex" which they feel is responsible for 
much that has happened in Vietnam and for the 
failure of the government to deal more effectively 
with domestic social problems. 

Stung by this never-ending criticism, business 
and industrial leaders today are quite aware of the 
fact that society expects them to do more than pro- 
vide goods and services for the insatiable demands 
of consumers. President Nixon has indicated that 
business should help government find solutions to 
poverty and unemployment, assist in rebuilding the 



WINTER 1970 



cities, and become a full partner in the effort to deal 
with the ills of modern society. 

In 1968 the National Alliance of Businessmen, 
headed by Stuart J. Saunders, president of the Penn 
Central Company, embarked on an effort to find a 
half-million jobs for the hard-core unemployed by 
June of 1971. — ronald berkheimer 

Recognizing its own responsibilities as an institution 
of higher education, wishing to take a more promi- 
nent role in helping to solve regional problems, and 
to promote "an understanding of contemporary 
business problems and the responsibilities of private 
enterprise in a changing social environment," Sus- 
quehanna University sponsored its first Business-In- 



dustry Symposium on November 21. In creating a 
forum for the discussion of mutual concerns, the 
University hopes to forge a meaningful and effective 
partnership with business and industry. 

Nearly 100 business and industrial leaders from 
Central Pennsylvania attended the Symposium, 
which consisted of three afternoon presentations, a 
dinner in the Campus Center, and an address by 
Dr. Roger M. Blough, former chairman of the Board 
of the U.S. Steel Corporation. Afternoon speakers 
were Clifford L. Jones, secretary of labor and indus- 
try for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and two 
Susquehanna faculty members: Dr. Kenneth O. Flad- 
mark, professor of business administration; David 
E. Horlacher, associate professor of economics. 



. they have to make a profit, because 
there is no way to survive if you're in the red. 



Leading off the sessions related to the social re- 
sponsibility of business in today's society, Clifford 
Jones stated that the free enterprise system in which 
we live is not really the same as that which began 
in the 1800s — "We live today in a controlled free 
enterprise or a controlled capitalistic system where 
the protection of the individual and of our resources 
is really governed, which makes government a re- 
gality in some ways." He prefers to think of govern- 
ment as a person, he said, but nevertheless: 

"I happen to believe that businessmen and 
government people and labor people are all indi- 
viduals with the same ability for good and evil, and 
it depends so much on these individuals and incen- 
tive — we sometimes call it profit, or accomplishment, 
or satisfaction. Whatever you want to call it, the 
individual's incentive comes out in either govern- 
ment, in union leadership or in business enterprise. 
And if it is not present there usually isn't much that 
happens because people become bored and they do 
not become as productive as they must. On the 
other hand, if they are not in some way controlled, 
then you get into the words 'greed' and 'exploita- 
tion.' So I happen to believe that a controlled free 
enterprise system is probably the best system I have 
seen in our society and our world today." 

He cited three questions to be considered when 



talking about business and industry in today's so- 
ciety: (1) What do we require today of business and 
industry?, (2) What do we expect?, (3) What must 
we expect against this background of a controlled 
free enterprise system that must have incentive? 

Under requirements, Jones listed many. We re- 
quire industry and business to pay taxes — federal, 
state and local. Unemployment compensation, for 
example, is a big tax in every state; while thought 
of as an employee benefit, it is still a tax. Then, 
there are federal corporate income taxes, state cor- 
porate income taxes, local and county real estate 
taxes, sales taxes on goods not used in manufacture, 
excise taxes on capital investments, franchise taxes 
on capital stock, corporate loan taxes, etc. We re- 
quire industry to be a tax collector, too. Businesses 
collect sales taxes, certain local wage taxes, occu- 
pational privilege taxes, income taxes for the fed- 
eral government. "And they are tax collectors with- 
out pay, providing their own bookkeeping, and un- 
der a strict censorship by all governmental bodies 
to maintain accurate records. Many of them today 
are going to computers, hiring tax experts and at- 
torneys and technical personnel so they do not run 
afoul of laws and regulations. Controlled capital- 
istic society." 

We require a minimum wage — and in Pennsyl- 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 




vania there is an additional requirement to cover 
other industries that are not covered by a federal 
minimum wage. We require workmen's compensa- 
tion. We require stringent safety regulations for the 
welfare of not only those at work, but also any 
others who might be affected. He said there are 
"over 70 laws affecting requirements that industry 
and business must meet, from panic doors to fire 
escapes to certain health facilities in washrooms and 
powder rooms, and all types of regulations concern- 
ing working conditions. And the federal government 
has some in addition." Regulatory procedures are 
becoming even more stringent in light of the need 
to find solutions to air and water pollution. 

"What do we expect? We expect that industry 
and business provide the jobs and the payroll for 
the base of the community. I say it again because 
this is today's philosophy. We look today at an in- 
dustry as the base jobs and the base payroll in the 
community. While we require it, we expect them 
also to be a major part of the community tax base. 
Now that's locally and statewide — and to a lesser 
degree nationally — but we do think of industry as 
a job producer and a payroll producer. This isn't 
the way it used to be. We also expect, and we would 
be very disappointed if it didn't happen, that indus- 
try must produce particularly large industry divi- 
dends which become income for many of us. There 
are many elderly people that I know and you know, 
too, who depend on the monthly check and the 
quarterly check and the yearly check for their sub- 



sistence today because their retirement incomes are 
not sufficient, and there are many of you who depend 
upon industry for dividends for supplemental in- 
come. 

"We depend on business and industry for some- 
thing else. There isn't a community drive that goes 
on when all of us sit down together to go over po- 
tential givers that someone doesn't say, 'Well, here's 
a Jodo steel company and the plastic company and 
the food company, and we'll mark them down for 
$10,000 each — and the man who is plant manager, 
he ought to be the top giver.' We expect them to be 
the large contributors in our community. We also 
expect — and it's true if our drive is to be a success, 
particularly the United Fund — we expect them to 
be the collector of the payroll deduction fund. This 
is what we expect today." 

He referred back to the era of Adam Smith, point- 
ing out that the "real purpose" of industry is to 
produce the goods and services needed by people, 
and to supply them at a reasonable price and in 
quantity so that people "don't have to stand in 
line." While we may not think about it that much 
today, this expectation is still basic. 

"But if we expect them to do all this we've got 
to expect one other thing . . . that they have to 
make a profit, because there is no way to survive if 
you're in the red." 

Let us not forget, Jones continued, that when 
there is a problem in the community — when there 
is too much smoke, or someone else's taxes are too 



WINTER 1970 



high — business is "the first horse that's kicked." 
Even though in some cases the criticism is justified, 
industry must make a profit and "we also must be 
careful that we in government particularly do not 
harass because it is far worse to have a dozen in- 
spectors call on the same industry on a dozen differ- 
ent regulations . . . this can be more of a nuisance 
seeing them than enforcing the regulation itself." 

What else must we expect? What is the role of 
industry in today's society? 

"We're just in the process of completing an- 
other moon flight in which billions of dollars were 
spent very successfully. The camera alone that didn't 
work because it was exposed to the sun cost be- 
tween $78,000 and $90,000. It was developed by 
an industry — not by government, by an industry. 
The capsule was developed by another industry, and 
there are at least a dozen industries in Pennsylvania 
that have funneled their knowledge into the space- 
craft itself. We expected something." The govern- 
ment spends our money on projects like this, he 
said, thereby providing stimulation — incentive — to 
business so it can stay in business. But there are 
plenty of problems to be solved. 



Discussing specifically social problems, he re- 
ferred to the program of the National Alliance of 
Businessmen and offered that if we expect to make 
productive people of welfare recipients, if we are 
asking industry to employ poor risks or those with 
prison records, government must be willing to set 
the example and hire such persons itself. 

He also touched on the problem of the cities 
and housing for low-income families, stating that the 
investment in new cities (like Reston, Va.; Colum- 
bia, Md.; Coral Springs, Fla.) is so huge that gov- 
ernment will have to cooperate. "There will be no 
more new cities by private companies alone unless 
we do for the new city what we're doing for the old 
city right now, which means expenditures for sewer 
and water . . . and we must expect that there will be 
new forms of housing." Technological problems need 
to be solved, ground transportation must be solved, 
health care must be modernized. In summary: 

"Business, industry are people. They must find 
solutions to the problems because government isn't 
going to. Government must stimulate and provide 
the incentive — it cannot be just a regulator, it must 
be a partner." 



. . even if all businessmen were saints, the academic economist 
ould still oppose the doctrine of social responsibility. 



David Horlacher drew a distinction between two 
rather distinct types of economists: 

"There is the well-groomed, thoroughly-domes- 
ticated house economist. He works for a medium to 
very large corporation, writes speeches for high ex- 
ecutives and articles for company publications, and 
makes occasional presentations of his economic fore- 
casts at meetings of top management. Often such 
men become vice presidents of the corporations they 
serve. They are happy with the business community 
and the business community is happy with them. 

"But there is the older type of economist. He is 
not on the payroll of business. He works for a uni- 
versity. There is no particular reason why he should 
be happy with the business community and generally 
isn't. Likewise, since he does not serve the needs 
and desires of the business community there is no 
particular reason why businessmen should be happy 



with the academic economist. Generally they are not. 

"And so for a long time businessmen listened 
to the flattering appraisals of their own house econo- 
mists and closed their ears to the rather uncompli- 
mentary remarks being made about them by the 
academic economist. But things are changing. 

"Over the last 30 years the academic economist 
developed a new set of mathematical and statistical 
tools for understanding and forecasting the effects 
of alternative economic policies. He scored his first 
successes with government. In 1947 there was the 
creation of a Council of Economic Advisers to the 
President. Now today we see Arthur Burns, an aca- 
demic economist from Columbia and a former chair- 
man of the Council of Economic Advisers, being 
appointed chairman of the Board of Governors of 
the Federal Reserve. That body has constructed and 
now employs a huge econometric model in connec- 



SUSQUEHANNA ALUMNUS 



tion with the economics department of M.I.T. whose 
leading light is Paul Samuelson. Samuelson and Mil- 
ton Friedman of the University of Chicago regularly 
write for Newsweek magazine. Time magazine has 
just created a panel of 20 academic economists to 
advise it. Many large companies are hiring econo- 
mists of the academic variety to do honest research 
on company problems, and are gently easing the 
old faithful but technically obsolete house economist 
upstairs. And last month the first Nobel prize in 
economics was awarded to two mathematically ori- 
ented academic economists. 

"The business community no longer closes its 
ears to the views of the academic economist, espe- 
cially in regard to the social responsibilities of the 
business community — even though these views stand 
in sharp contrast to the position papers of the house 
economist. And for this we are grateful." 

He used several quotations from business lead- 
ers and consultants to illustrate some of the preva- 
lent attitudes of big business: The corporation has 
a responsibility to reshape American higher educa- 
tion so as best to serve the needs of the corporation. 
. . . "Corporate conscience" is management's recog- 
nition of an obligation to the society it serves, not 
only for maximum economic performance but for 
humane and constructive social policies as well. . . . 
The corporations of the future must be those that 
are semi-public servants. . . . We feel our obligation 
to the general public as strongly as to our investing 
public. ... In the light of the present, every thought- 
ful man must conclude that the purpose of industry 
is quite as much the advancement of social well- 
being as the production of wealth. . . . Today's man- 
ager serves as a trustee not only for the owners, but 
for our entire society. Corporations have developed 
a sensitive awareness of their responsibility for main- 
taining an equitable balance among the claims of 
stockholders, employees, customers and the public 
at large. 

Horlacher said that the academic economist 
"looks at the same set of facts and argues that the 
doctrine of social responsibility is essentially a con- 
tinuation and refurbishing of the 19th century doc- 
trine of 'trusteeship' which demands an attitude of 
noblesse oblige on the part of the wealthy and power- 
ful." He questions whether the businessman has 
either the moral right or the obligation to take upon 
himself the righting of social wrongs according to his 
own view. 

"No man should depend on the good will of an- 
other for his protection. The difficulty with any kind 
of paternalism, business or government, is first that 



it depends on the moral sense of the powerful (which 
may be faulty) and second that it degrades the re- 
cipient as well. . . . even if all businessmen were 
saints, the academic economist would still oppose the 
doctrine of social responsibility." 

He went on to quote from the writings of Mil- 
ton Friedman, Ben Lewis of Oberlin College, and 
Theodore Levitt, supporting the contention that 
business has only one social responsibility — to use 
its resources and engage in activities designed to 
increase profits; that self-selected private individuals 
should not decide what the social interest is and are 
not justified in placing the burden on their stock- 
holders to serve the social interest; that if business- 
men are civil servants rather than employees of their 
stockholders, in a democracy they will sooner or 
later be chosen by public techniques of election and 
appointment; that welfare and society are not the 
corporation's business — its business is making 
money, not sweet music; that government should 
take care of the general welfare so that business can 
take care of the more material aspects of welfare. 

Horlacher said that he personally tends to re- 
ject these views of his colleagues and, rather, with 
Adolf Berle, feels that the corporation is far too 
powerful today not to be recognized as a political 
institution on which the flow of events naturally 
forces a degree of public responsibility. 

"Who can deny that businessmen have immense 
social power? To the extent that businessmen or any 
other group have social power they should have 
commensurate social responsibilities. 

"This certainly does not mean that business in- 
tervention is appropriate in all areas of our social 
life. The real question should not be whether busi- 
ness should accept social responsibility, but rather, 
'What is the nature and extent of these responsi- 
bilities?' 

"To reject the doctrine of social responsibility 
is to forget the economic theory of the 'second best.' 
This theory states that if the optimal situation re- 
quires that a number of different conditions be met 
and one or more of these cannot be met, then it 
is not necessarily second best to require that the 
remaining conditions be met. 

"The optimal situation may call for an econo- 
my made up of purely competitive firms devoted 
exclusively to profit maximization. But once we ac- 
cept the desirability of large, imperfectly competitive 
firms, then it no longer follows that requiring strict 
adherence to a single-minded pursuit of profit is 
second best. I would hold on the contrary that a 
carefully thought out doctrine of social responsi- 



WINTER 1970 



bility would come much closer to second best. And 
in this most imperfect of worlds, I think we would 
do quite well to settle for second best." 

He stated, however, that we should be aware 
that it is second best, that it would be better if 
competition were strong enough to keep prices down 
to the point where managers had no economic sur- 
plus to distribute in accord with its own value judg- 
ments; that it would be better if corporate profits 



were paid to the stockholder who could endow the 
colleges of his choice, rather than being forced to 
endow the colleges of management's choice. 

"As citizens, we should continue to seek ways 
to reestablish the forces of competition and the prin- 
ciple of stockholder control over the corporations 
they own so that both the social power and the social 
responsibilities of the business community can be 
kept at an absolute minimum." 



. . it is not a question of the company having either 
economic efficiency or human satisfaction . . . both are necessary. 



Kenneth Fladmark took up the subject of the 
human implications of social responsibility within 
the firm. He said that business is exercising social 
responsibility when it allows non-economic elements 
to influence business decisions, and described two 
"faces" of this responsibility: 

"On the one hand, since businessmen are man- 
aging an economic unit in society, they may have a 
broad obligation to the community with regard to 
economic developments affecting the pub